#1
Well lately ive been learning some scales and I think im a little confused. Is there such thing as "the" major scale thats like not in a key or something. Cause I need to learn some scales and im not sure what it is.

If anyone can answer that thx.

sry if its confusing
#2
no all Major Scales are in a certain key such as:

A major

G Major

they really aren't that hard to learn, just takes practice
#3
Quote by SLCdragons102
Well lately ive been learning some scales and I think im a little confused. Is there such thing as "the" major scale thats like not in a key or something. Cause I need to learn some scales and im not sure what it is.

If anyone can answer that thx.

sry if its confusing

Yes there is..."the major scale" just refers to the pattern of intervals specific to that scale which is

WWHWWWH

where W is a single tone or whole step which equates to 2 frets on the guitar and H is a semitone or half step which equates to one fret. If you pick any root note and follow that pattern you'll have the major scale of that particular note. It's important to remember that the steps in the scale are MUSICAL steps, they refer to the difference in pitch between the notes, not the physical position on the guitar....the same note will appear in multiple positions on the fretboard.
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#4
so if say I wanted to play the E major scale it would be...


-----------------1-2--------------------
----------0-2-4-------------------------
---0-2-4--------------------------------

then do u go another octave?
#5
Yes, then you can just continue the pattern, so you're essentially starting from an E one octave up and going on from there through another E Major scale. A scale is just a pattern of whole and half steps. If you take the pattern that you tabbed out there, and shift it up one fret, you're playing an F major scale (because the first note you play, the "tonic," is now an F, and you continue from there).

Shift it up again, and you're playing an F-sharp (or G-flat) Major scale. Shift it again and you're playing a G Major scale. And so on...