#1
Hello all havent been on these forums in a while, but anyways. i was wondering what scales bands like children of bodom, black dahlia murder, bring me the horizon, and parkway drive use to solo in im having trouble finding what scales they use. Please help me. thanks
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#2
a lot of metal/scenecore i listen to uses the chromatic scale but thts just wat i hear
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#5
Children of Bodom use Harmonic Minor scales, which is just a minor scale but with the 7th scale degree raised half a step.
The Black Dahlia Murder uses diminished scales, which is a scale using just all minor third intervals.
Harmonic Minor
E-----------------------------
B----------------------------
G---------------------------
D-----------------------6--7
A------------5--7--8-------
E--5--7--8-----------------

Diminished
E----------------------
B----------------------
G----------------------
D---------------7-----
A--------6--9-------
E-5--8----------------
bring me the horizon and children of bodom also use diminished scales
but these bands dont JUST use these scales. but i was just giving some examples.
hope this helps!
Last edited by BrutalBass92 at Nov 29, 2008,
#6
Quote by BrutalBass92
Children of Bodom use Harmonic Minor scales, which is just a minor scale but with the 7th scale degree raised half a step.
The Black Dahlia Murder uses diminished scales, which is a scale using just all minor third intervals.
E-----------------
B-----------------
G-----------------
D---------------7
A--------6--9---
E-5--8----------
bring me the horizon and children of bodom also use diminished scales
but these bands dont JUST use these scales. but i was just giving some examples.
hope this helps!


That's not a diminished scale, that's a diminished arpeggio; diminished scales follow a whole-half or half-whole pattern.

Those kind of artists tend to stick to any scale with a minor tonality but to be honest just using a certain scale won't give you a sound like any particular artist. You need to get into the mindset of the writers so learn your theory properly and look at the way they write songs, then you'll understand where they come from and you'll be able to write like them.
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#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
That's not a diminished scale, that's a diminished arpeggio; diminished scales follow a whole-half or half-whole pattern.

Those kind of artists tend to stick to any scale with a minor tonality but to be honest just using a certain scale won't give you a sound like any particular artist. You need to get into the mindset of the writers so learn your theory properly and look at the way they write songs, then you'll understand where they come from and you'll be able to write like them.


o my bad on the diminished arpeggio, your right.
but black dahlia do use those quite alot. haha

thanks for the correction though
#9
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
That's not a diminished scale, that's a diminished arpeggio; diminished scales follow a whole-half or half-whole pattern.

Those kind of artists tend to stick to any scale with a minor tonality but to be honest just using a certain scale won't give you a sound like any particular artist. You need to get into the mindset of the writers so learn your theory properly and look at the way they write songs, then you'll understand where they come from and you'll be able to write like them.

You hit the nail on the head. It's all about phrasing, not what scales you use.
#10
locrian modes are pretty common in modern metal, metalcore or whatever as well
^Note: Probably sarcastic
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#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
That's not a diminished scale, that's a diminished arpeggio; diminished scales follow a whole-half or half-whole pattern.

Those kind of artists tend to stick to any scale with a minor tonality but to be honest just using a certain scale won't give you a sound like any particular artist. You need to get into the mindset of the writers so learn your theory properly and look at the way they write songs, then you'll understand where they come from and you'll be able to write like them.

This. Musicians rarely use any scales other than the modes, pentatonic, or harmonic minor.

Bodom for example uses aeolian (minor), harmonic minor, and occasionally pentatonic scales.
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#13
Quote by Deep*Kick
locrian modes are pretty common in modern metal, metalcore or whatever as well

No they aren't, the locrian mode is hardly ever used by anyone.
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#14
Quote by steven seagull
No they aren't, the locrian mode is hardly ever used by anyone.


its more common than you think
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#15
^ Barely...
If it were then all we'd ever hear in metal is dissonance....
It's used occasionally to create a lot of tension. Probably actually more common in (jazz and) classical....

Then again, this is just from what I've heard, and the amount I listen to metal is pretty small, so, seeing as I've never actually heard any of the bands being discussed, I may be wrong I guess....
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#16
i would say dissonance followed by some kind of resolution is what metal is all about
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#17
Don't look into the locrian mode, if you want to make good solo's in Metal or any other music you're best of learning the natural minor scale and the relative modes.

If you learnt the A natural minor scale as a starting point I'd recommend learning it' different shapes across the fret board and try E Phygrian which is a relative mode to the natural minor.
#18
Quote by EatShreddies
Don't look into the locrian mode, if you want to make good solo's in Metal or any other music you're best of learning the natural minor scale and the relative modes.

If you learnt the A natural minor scale as a starting point I'd recommend learning it' different shapes across the fret board and try E Phygrian which is a relative mode to the natural minor.

The natural minor scale is a mode (aeolian) of the major scale anyway. If you know your major scale you should know natural minor scale.
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#19
imo, buckethead is god,
anyways, find a scale that you like, and work around it, dont try and copy other people's music, and idolise them, kinda pathetic, get in a band and make ur n music, you'll learn ALOT faster that way.

just my thought tho.
#20
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Those kind of artists tend to stick to any scale with a minor tonality but to be honest just using a certain scale won't give you a sound like any particular artist. You need to get into the mindset of the writers so learn your theory properly and look at the way they write songs, then you'll understand where they come from and you'll be able to write like them.


I'm just going to go ahead and quote myself here 'cause...y'know...I'm so fucking right it hurts.
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