#1
Ok so I didnt really know what this should go under so basics seemed appropriate. Also just so you know Ive been playing for about 6 years so Im not a beginner. Well Im working on my speed and I have been for quite a while and I will be shreding up a scale and flub a couple notes and I dont know if its my fret hand or my pick hand. How do I know which it is or is there a way at all?
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#3
Get a metronome out and practice very slowly at first. Gradually increase your speed until you begin making mistakes, and then analyze your technique at that speed; you should be able to then determine what you're doing incorrectly.
#4
Quote by :-D
Get a metronome out and practice very slowly at first. Gradually increase your speed until you begin making mistakes, and then analyze your technique at that speed; you should be able to then determine what you're doing incorrectly.

I do this all the time for new riffs. Start out slow till you get the hang of it, then speed it up by a little. And then try playing it without a metronome. Trial and error.
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#5
Often its not one of the hands that causes dead notes, but both hands not synchronizing with each other. Are you playing 3-per-string scales (or 2, or 4 per string scales)? These scales are usually easier to get faster because the right hand is playing a constant picking pattern (DUD, UDU etc). The CAGED scales are often where most guys get dead notes because the picking pattern is always changing (DU, UDU, DUD, UD). Sometimes its three notes on a string, and then two and then three - and it screws up the synchronizing of the hands.

At least thats what happens to me.
#6
Quote by Ty Quinn
Often its not one of the hands that causes dead notes, but both hands not synchronizing with each other. Are you playing 3-per-string scales (or 2, or 4 per string scales)? These scales are usually easier to get faster because the right hand is playing a constant picking pattern (DUD, UDU etc). The CAGED scales are often where most guys get dead notes because the picking pattern is always changing (DU, UDU, DUD, UD). Sometimes its three notes on a string, and then two and then three - and it screws up the synchronizing of the hands.

At least thats what happens to me.

+1

one of the biggest traps you can fall into is the old "my x hand is not as fast as my y hand" myth. The sooner you start concentrating on how well both hands work together the sooner you'll start to improve.

Also "speed" isn't something you can work on - it's a reflection of your skills, not a skill in itself. That means "practicing speed" is always doomed to failure because it's not actually something you can do. What you can do is practice things that affect how fast you can play, like accuracy, finger independence and dexterity, economy of movement and fretboard knowledge.
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