#1
I dont understand them! I understand you can create them by taking the first degree off, and adding it to the end.

Wait, nevermind. pretty sure i dont understand them at all.
What are they (in simple, american terms)
How are they used (how to make them)


And. I know you can just learn the modes to a scale, i think it changes depending on if its minor or major, but would you just tack that onto the key your playing... or play off the scale...


thanks
Frusciante

zzeazz -

Im coming for you
#2
As for what they are the diatonic modes are simply the same as playing the major scale, just from a different point within the scale therefore affecting the tonality of the scale itself. Like playing C major, but if you play from the starting point of E you have shifted the major scale steps as follows, 1-b2-b3-4-5-b6-b7. . . . it is a minor mode and has certain characteriestics that would not be found in the natural minor scale, which in comparison to C Major would be A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A or in formulaic evaluation, 1-2-b3-4-5-b6-b7. . . . notice the difference of one formulaic change creates another minor mode which is the phrygian mode. . . .

That's as far as I'm going in, I've kinda explained this to people too many times, learn basic classical theory and one of the first studies will be Modes, and you'll get the understanding you really need there.
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#4
Well, it's just starting from a different degree, and something you should memorize. I'll go out on a limb and just repost this. . .

I-Ionian- 1-2-3-4-5-6-7(C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C)
ii-Dorian- 1-2-b3-4-5-6-b7(D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D) (it's just natural minor with an natural 6th)
iii- Phrygian- 1-b2-b3-4-5-b6-b7(E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E) (natural minor, lowered 2nd)
IV-Lydian- 1-2-3-#4-5-6-7(F-G-A-B-C-D-E-F) (natural major, raised 4th)
V- Mixolydian- 1-2-3-4-5-6-b7(G-A-B-C-D-E-F-G) (natural major with minor 7th, dominant)
vi- Aeolian- 1-2-b3-4-5-b6-b7(A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A) (natural minor)
vii- Locrian- 1-b2-b3-4-b5-b6-b7(B-C-D-E-F-G-A-B) (half-diminished)

I haven't went to bed obviously. . . but, that should cover the most basic explanation, but for example when you switch to key of F major, that is why you have to lower the 4th tone, which happens to be a B, so in the key of F major, you have one flat and it's B. .. like in the key signature when actually writing music. . . . . And FTW, Diminished scales, W-H-W-H like that symmetrical one that just lines up, sound awesome, and Harmonic and jazz minor sound awesome too. . . .

harmonic minor has a fully diminished mode so of course I love it. but for the formule it's 1-2-b3-4-5-b6-7. . . so in A minor it would be A B C D E F G# A. . . .

Jazz melodic minor's formula is 1-2-b3-4-5-6-7 or in A minor A B C D E F# G# A. . . .

Have fun with it, it's only music after all.

As for the roman numerals above, I gave you the minor and major scale harmony along with the formula for the modes. . . . they fall the same in every scale, but just whatever key you are in will alter the order of the modes, naturally. . . .
Quote by paranoid joker

Metal, should kick you in the nuts, after you catch it messing around with your girlfriend.
and then make a sandwhich in your house and walk out.


Http://www.myspace.com/drowningiris