#1
Sup I'm a nub trying to learn guitar and got a couple questions on the stuff I'm gonna buy..

What do you think of...

epiphone les paul standard plus that blue finish(forgot the name...) and for the amp, a line 6 spider III 15w? Don't necessarily have a budget but I don't want to buy a crap guitar and change it pretty soon; I want a decent guitar and a decent amp to start with.

I also plan on learning from the internet and maybe some books...

Could you tell me if this site is accurate and resourceful for a beginner?
www.justinguitar.com

also some recommendations for books would be nice...not those ones with standard w/e u call it, I'd ike books explaining tabs...(if u think i should learn both then say so pls..)

Anyway that's it and I plan on playing as a hobby in my room just to pay songs I like which are anything from classic rock to heavy metal. Thank you if you can post.
#2
if you have interest in learning metal, I would suggest an ibanez for the price range of an epiphone. They have pickups that will get more squeal and better pinch harmonics than an epiphone. i.e. perfect metal guitar. the only reason i wouldn't get an ibanez as a beginner, though, is that some feel that learning to restring one if a string breaks is difficult cus of the whammy/tremelo. But then again, my first gutiar had a whammy, and I just learned to restring it from my teacher, and you could probably just find out how on youtube.
Also, if you want a decent guitar that you aren't going to want to upgrade for a while, you should be aware that epiphones are considered by many ( but not all) to be "fake" les paul gibsons i.e. they are looked down upon as "imitations" of the real thing--a way to affordably get something that looks like a les paul. They are even made by a sub company owned by gibson. I'm not trying to outright bash them, but i just wanted you to know that you will one day want something where people aren't going to ask, "what do you play?" "a les paul" "is it an epiphone or a real one?" "epiphone" "oh...." The more you learn from being around guitar, the more you will get to know brand name reputations. An ibanez would stand alone as a respectable guitar and i would recommend one in my opinion. Or if you wanted a gibson brand guitar, then get a gibson SG which is also respectable. And by respectable, i mean you are less likely to want to upgrade. I play a b.c. rich warlock, a rg2570e ibanez, a gibson les paul standard, and a spanish guitar i picked up while in spain. And yeah, i bought the warlock as a first guitar cus i didn't know anything about guitars in 7th grade and asked my friends at school what to get. not a bad guitar, but it isn't my image. So make sure YOU like it.
Justinguitar is a good site, i checked it out for my sister when she started learning. it's also good to look up tutorials on youtube from the people who actually wrote the songs you are learning or from a lesson that has 5 stars. you can find very reliable tutorials on youtube if you type the name of a song and then "tutorial" or "lesson" after it and look for vids with 5 stars. there are a lot of wrong tabs on this site which is bad for a beginner who can't tell what's wrong so only look at tabs that are 5 stars and even then, read the comments and even then there could still be mistakes. And learning standard notation or music notes isn't that important for guitar. I know it from 12 years of piano and all it helps me with is rhythm during solos or riffs i can't quite make out by ear. so as far as standard notation, just learn what counts the notes get and how to count--note values i.e. quarter note = 1 beat etc.-- with a metronome and use the tabs to find out what to actually play.
other than that, your set. But getting a teacher would be best to learn technique cus they can tell you stuff your doing wrong.
good luck.
#3
I disagree with the above poster... the Epiphone Les Paul is good for classic rock and metal. If you just want to play metal, yeah, go with an Ibanez... but not the cheap ones, the pickups aren't that good and the tremolos are terrible. I wouldn't call an Ibanez a 'perfect metal guitar' either... some of the higher end ones are great, but a guitar is only perfect when it suits the needs of the person playing it.

I have 2 Epiphones, and I love them, would not trade them for anything. Don't buy a guitar because it has a name on the headstock, I'm really trying to refrain from calling the above poster an idiot (I wouldn't do that because I'm nice, and I can see where he is coming from... I just blatantly disagree). It doesn't matter if it's a Gibson or a Fender, or an Epiphone or a Squier. If it plays good and sounds good, it doesn't matter a rats ass, and 85% of your audience aren't even going to notice what kind of guitar you're playing. A high end Epiphone is 9 times out of 10 better than a Gibson Les Paul Studio. So don't worry about the name on the headstock. The Epiphone Les Pauls are a fine guitar, as long as it's not the Special or that other cheap one... apart from that, it should suit you just fine. ^_^

The amp I would review however. A lot of beginners buy Line 6 Spiders and end up regretting it later, they sound very digital, and really bad at high volumes. As a beginner, you might be better off looking at something like a Peavey Vypyr or a Vox.

Don't know much about that site, can't help you there.
#4
yeah the guitar is fine but i never have liked line 6 amps, although i havent played that one specifically, there so raspy old man voice sounding. it doesnt give out a clear sound and its all toney. kinda just for metally stuff.
#5
Hey thanks for the responses, I don't mind the brand since Ima be playing in my room for fun and not to rock out in a concert or anything lol...Thanks for all the info, but slickerthnsleek, what amp would you recommend that's cheap but not terrible?
#7
You should go into the shop and try guitars out, is my advice.
Everything's a matter of opinion.
Although, if you have a bad back, Epiphone/Gibson Les Pauls are by far the heaviest guitar I've ever played.
Quote by sheumack111
I allways found that having sex while listening to Tool/Planet X/Dream Theater was hard because every time you tryed o keep the beat they would change time sig, then you would get pissed off and then loose your mojo for the nite.....

I fucking Lol'd
#8
Quote by slickerthnsleek
I disagree with the above poster... the Epiphone Les Paul is good for classic rock and metal. If you just want to play metal, yeah, go with an Ibanez... but not the cheap ones, the pickups aren't that good and the tremolos are terrible. I wouldn't call an Ibanez a 'perfect metal guitar' either... some of the higher end ones are great, but a guitar is only perfect when it suits the needs of the person playing it.

I have 2 Epiphones, and I love them, would not trade them for anything. Don't buy a guitar because it has a name on the headstock, I'm really trying to refrain from calling the above poster an idiot (I wouldn't do that because I'm nice, and I can see where he is coming from... I just blatantly disagree). It doesn't matter if it's a Gibson or a Fender, or an Epiphone or a Squier. If it plays good and sounds good, it doesn't matter a rats ass, and 85% of your audience aren't even going to notice what kind of guitar you're playing. A high end Epiphone is 9 times out of 10 better than a Gibson Les Paul Studio. So don't worry about the name on the headstock. The Epiphone Les Pauls are a fine guitar, as long as it's not the Special or that other cheap one... apart from that, it should suit you just fine. ^_^

The amp I would review however. A lot of beginners buy Line 6 Spiders and end up regretting it later, they sound very digital, and really bad at high volumes. As a beginner, you might be better off looking at something like a Peavey Vypyr or a Vox.

Don't know much about that site, can't help you there.


I disagree on the ibanez point Ive played 3 different RG models and they can all do classic rock as well.
Ibanez RG7321
Jackson Randy Rhoads V with Floyd Rose
Peavey Valveking 112
Digitech RP70 Guitar Processor
#9
I just bought an Epiphone Les Paul Standard last week. I have nothing to compare it to other than my starter Squier Strat. I'm a begginer so I can't say too much here but I will say that the difference in quality between those two guitars is night and day, not just construction but sound quality as well.

I also bought a new Raven 60watt amp to replace the Fender starter amp. Once again, night and day difference.

I've been playing almost 3 months. I outgrew my starter equipment already but feel like I purchased equipment within my budget that will make me happy for a few years.

As far as justinguitar.com goes... he's a great instructor. There is a new site coming out next month at freeandeasyguitar.com. Otherwise, check out YouTube. Look at the instructor's ratings and read their comments because there are some horrible instructors on Youtube!
#10
I can understand there the first poster royalewcheese35 is coming from with the Epiphone vs Gibson thing. In the big music world a guitar is a lot like a car. Some people judge you for it.

Now the thing I have to say about it... Everyone starts somewhere. I don't care if you first started with a Squier. Everyone starts from somewhere. Hopefully you wont call it "The best guitar ever" or "Perfect for anyone" or "Totally pawns your Gibson." Like a car, it gets you from point A to point B for you. Usually for people that means "Finding out if guitar is my thing."

I would recommend something in your price range. Assuming how you describe what you are looking at, and the amp you are recommending, it looks like you are in the $300 guitar and $200 amp or about $500 total for both area.

Judging by the amp you were looking at, you know what you think sounds good. I would have to say however, you should really look into other amps too. Its true a lot of people after getting into guitar more think Line 6 Spider III are horrible. To, as you put it, a noob, you wont be able to tell the difference between some amps. Your ears just aren't used to it. That's not a big deal. Everyone starts somewhere. Try looking at the Peavey Vypyr 15 and Roland Microcube. Those are powerful enough for your bedroom. If at a later time you feel like joining a band, you can look into bigger amps. But for what you are doing, and the experience you have, one of those two should be fine.

As for guitars, you might look into some Ibanez guitars also. They have nice necks and sound good vs some other guitars in your price range. The Epiphone you are looking at too is a good choice, but like I said, at least look at the other ones too. Also don't worry about the color/finish/look of the guitar until you decide which you like, then look at what it has. Sound > looks. For a school kid, a car that looks awesome but only gets 10MPG isnt a good idea. A car that looks a little worse but gets 40MPG is what you want for your circumstances.

Justinguitar is a great site and I learned a bunch of stuff from there. You can learn tabs from google. "How to read tabs" works. Also when looking on youtube for lessons use the keywords "Lesson" "how to" and even "tutorial". Also look around at "Related Videos" from some of the lessons, you find gems sometimes.

Hope this answers a lot?
#11
Thanks again I think I will go with the peavy one that some of you mentioned. As for playing to figure out what I want, I literally don't know how to play anything and I don't know how to mess with the tone and volume and all that jazz to see what sounds good. <_< Also for the ibanez, I did look at some but there are so many models and confusing names like blahblah2394394 so I don't know which one is good around the quality of a epiphone les paul standard. Maybe some recommendations would be nice for an ibanez around 350-400.
#12
Frankly, the best method for choosing a guitar is to hit as many shops as possible and try them out yourself. Find somthing that feels good in your hands, looks good to you, and sounds good unplugged (if it sounds dull and lifeless and buzzes a lot unplugged, it'll sound about the same plugged in. Look for somthing that has a lively, clean tone acousticly).

As far as the amp, get somthing dirt cheap. Starting out you won't notice much as quality is concerned, and you'd be best served putting more money into your starter guitar, getting a dirt cheap amp, learning your basics, then upgrading once you have an idea of what tones you like and generally what to look for. Trust me, you'll just be upgrading your first amp anyways, but if you buy right, your first guitar could be the guitar you play for years.

For books, get Hal Leonard or Mel Bay book 1. Great beginner books and you can go right through the series, plus you get to keep em around as a reference/refresher.
-Guitar Gear-
1995 American Fender Strat, EMG 85 pup
Randall RH200 Head
Marshall 1960a Cab
Woods Acoustic
-Bass Gear-
Spector Legend 4 bass
Washburn Bantam bass
Hartke HA2500
Fender Bassman 410H
Play what you love, love what you play
#13
Since you said yourself you cant really tell the difference between amps... then you might need to take a slight leap of faith with it and go with the "Everyone recommends" it approach here and go with the Peavey Vypyr 15 or Roland Microcube. Those are the two "Most recommended" amps here to starters and people who need a small amp for their room. Go ahead and search the forums with that and you will see how much they come up.

Not to say the Line 6 Spider III is bad, but there are a lot of people that say its bad, and that the Peavey is just plain better, and others that say its "Not as bad as they say it is" sorta thing and that you can get decent tones out of it with the correct setting. So in the end, you decide (of course).

That amp will last you a while and is better than starting with someone horrible. A lot of the quality of sound comes from an amp if you didn't know.
#14
I would suggest getting a practice amp first, but it doesn't really matter, but I would suggest it.

A good book to get (I recommend) is "Progressive Guitar Method for Beginners" or any in the series of all the books. There's one on metal, rock, blues and all different ones. The books tell you about bad habits you can pick up and tells you ways to get rid of them. Also there's a book on tablatures () with some songs in it and stuff.

Seriously check out that book^^. Or any in the series. Their good. Also try and get a teacher to learn basic guitar knowledge. It is good having a teacher. It's easier then learning yourself.

hope I helped.
Last edited by Omg A Triangle at Dec 1, 2008,