#1
for College i have to build a melody around this chord progression:
Am7 / Cmaj7 / Em7 / Bm7b5
Am7 / Cmaj7 / Fmaj7 / G7 which lasts about 40 seconds.

It doesnt need to be too complicated or have overly fast parts, im just stuck to what approach to take, like what scale to use for it or what would sound best. Im not to hot at theory really, just trying to improve my playing as much as i can.

Any pointers or ideas would be amazing, cheers !
#2
If you analyze the progression, you'll notice that every chord is diatonic (the natural chords of the key, which in this case is A minor/C major).

This means that you can use the C major scale and its modes (6th degree aeolian being A minor) pretty much exclusively and it'll work.

I've got other suggestions but I don't know if you know about passing tones and chord tones.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#3
it's definitly in C Major/ a minor. as for writing, record the progression and improvise over it, then keeps whatver parts you like.
#4
play the progression and do it yourself, if it's for college then i cant see how you would do improvising.
#5
The progression is in C major, so just use the modes of the C major scale corresponding to the root note of the chord. You should also try to add in as many chord tones as possible, and make sure that the melody notes you choose aren't going to be too dissonant with the corresponding chords.

Basically, just do everything you would do if you were improvising to that progression.
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#6
Quote by CHOCOmoney
it's definitly in C Major/ a minor. as for writing, record the progression and improvise over it, then keeps whatver parts you like.


So basically i could just stayin the C major scale/ modes that dont clash with certain chords?
#7
Quote by firebreath07
The progression is in C major, so just use the modes of the C major scale corresponding to the root note of the chord. You should also try to add in as many chord tones as possible, and make sure that the melody notes you choose aren't going to be too dissonant with the corresponding chords.

Basically, just do everything you would do if you were improvising to that progression.

Cool man, so basically i could stay in C through but sometimes shift modes depending on the chord below, so for example if one chord has a flattened 2nd id want to use the phrygian mode?