#1
I seriously cannot strum anything from any songs (apart from major and minor chords) and I can't learn anything all the way through. The only song I can play all the way through is Snow (Hey Oh) because its only picking. Is getting the technique of mixing strumming and picking as simple as just forcing yourself to do it. I can play the Dani California Solo but really want to be able to play the whole song but the strumming and position changes seem impossible to me and I just give up
#2
Try and be a bit more specific. Is there an anatomical problem, or you just "don't get it"?
My gear:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio
-Fender DG-11E Black (Acoustic)
-Marshall AVT50
-Cry Baby "Wylde Wah"
-Roland RE-20 Space Echo
#3
I think he cant get the struming patterns down.. like the different ways songs are strum. I am curious on this either cause I have a hard time explaining strumming to someone I am teaching aside from saying "it goes boom chacka chacka boom chacka chacka"
#4
Ah, I see.

Well in that case, just work on it. Songs have really complex rhythmic patterns at times, and RHCP tend to have a funky feel, with burst strumming etc. You got to practice rhythms too, in the same fashion you practice scales and picking patterns.

So you can't strum cause you haven't worked enough on it. Just listen to the song, get the feel, play along, or even slow it down to get it right. I'm pretty positive that if you use Windows Media Player, right-clicking on the play button lets you slow down the piece. So.. practice changes and you will get it down
My gear:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio
-Fender DG-11E Black (Acoustic)
-Marshall AVT50
-Cry Baby "Wylde Wah"
-Roland RE-20 Space Echo
#5
A lot of playing comes from intuitively feeling the song. You can overcome that with technical training. But it might be wise to take another tact as well.

Creativity is a muscle that can be built and worked on. One way to do that with strumming is simply to unplug the guitar and put some music on. Play along listening only to the music incorporating whatever technical skill you are working on. Don't worry about any aspect of playing except what you're working on, in this case your strumming. With the guitar unplugged you won't hear it but will feel it.

Practice different techniques you run across. Use the pick, use the fingers, use both. As you build this creative (intuitive) muscle you'll improve in many areas.

This is a great technique for breaking out of any rut you're in by the way.
#6
Quote by Bluemilk
I seriously cannot strum anything from any songs (apart from major and minor chords) and I can't learn anything all the way through. The only song I can play all the way through is Snow (Hey Oh) because its only picking. Is getting the technique of mixing strumming and picking as simple as just forcing yourself to do it. I can play the Dani California Solo but really want to be able to play the whole song but the strumming and position changes seem impossible to me and I just give up


I think I've spotted your problem.

If you're having trouble with something, like a chord change, keep practicing it. Don't move on to something else or try to learn other songs just because they're easier. There is no magic pill to make you a guitar god, you have to work for it.

Also - don't just try to learn songs.

Actually spend time practicing. Spend time practicing chords, chord transistions and strumming. Start with the basic chords (A, C, D, E, G) and once you've mastered those - including transitioning between them - start adding more (starting with F and B, then the minor and dominant 7th versions of all the chords you've already practiced)- save barre chords for last.
Gear

Gibson '57 Les Paul Reissue
Marshall TSL 601
EHX: Big Muff, Metal Muff, Small Stone, POG, 2880
Ibanez TS808
Voodoo Labs Microvibe
Analogman Chorus
Morley Bad Horsie II
Keeley Compressor (C4)
Nova Delay
MXR 10-band EQ
Last edited by Guitartist at Dec 1, 2008,
#7
One suggestion I would have would be to start out on simpler songs. A good song for strumming beginners would be Knocking On Heaven's Door (The Dylan Version).

Best of luck!
#8
When I was starting I was amazed at how hard just strumming a guitar was. How discouraging is that? But I pushed through it, I played along with songs, I looked up youtube lessons for strumming, I tried making my own rthyms or strumming patterns. You have to work for everything, but the good news is with work you can reach all of your guitar goals.
Quote by Gabel
You are EXTREMELY WRONG! I have played it. I own an 18W and it would be an awful stereo amp, it's way too bright, breaks up too easily and so on. Secondly, why would a guitar store sell an hifi amp.
#9
I think ya'll are a little confused, It's not like I cannot anatomically strum or don't know how to do it proerly. I can play Dylan songs and any other basic chord progression songs. But for example Dani California or Purple Haze past the intro, I can't make the correct fingerings and changes in time along with the picking that it goes with. It seems really cramped to me on the fingerboard and only hitting like DGB or whatever strings in the middle of the guitar is hard for me to do.
#11
I am 6 foot 4, big fingers and i manage to play purple haze decently, it really is practice. your fingers will feel weird cause they are new movements they arent use to just keep working at it.
#12
Yeah, literally just play the song, and other chord changes you consider hard really really slow so that you can do them with your eyes closed. Soon, you'll be able to play it much faster. I remember when I was learning the Fade to Black main solo about a year ago; it was the hardest thing ever. I played it super slow for aaaagges, now I can play it at 1.5 times the speed.
#13
Ya I had this problem a few years back when I first started,I just spent 5 hours struming untill my wrist was numb....it works LOL!
#15
Please don't promote your blog like that - this thread is so old that it's unlikely that anyone here still needs help with this issue. Point it out to users with relevant questions at the relevant time.