#1
ok, so I am trying to figure out the key of this chord progression. Bm7 - A7 - E - E. Can't be E because the B chord would be a major I think. Key of D fits except for the Ab in the E chord. Thoughts? Thanks in advance for any help.
#3
Quote by Kentris.5
It's probably Bm, which makes sense because it's the relative minor of D major, so the key signature would be the same. Also, more often than not a chord progression starts on the root position.


Not really. The key of a piece of music has no inherent relationship to the first chord in a progression.

TS: Did you write that progression yourself? It's a strange one. The A7 suggests D major (but there is no D major chord to resolve to) or Bm, the latter being unlikely because there is nothing to create a resolution to B. The progression is not diatonic to any key, and really doesn't seem to resolve anywhere.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#4
Quote by Archeo Avis
Not really. The key of a piece of music has no inherent relationship to the first chord in a progression.



it doesn't necessarily but with rock or pop based music, more often than not, the key will be the first chord used. It just seems to work out that way. Obviously not 100% correct, but it is usually a good place to start from if you have no idea.
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#5
Quote by jetpelkey41
it doesn't necessarily but with rock or pop based music, more often than not, the key will be the first chord used. It just seems to work out that way. Obviously not 100% correct, but it is usually a good place to start from if you have no idea.


It's not nearly common enough to be even remotely useful in determining the key of a piece of music.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
vm7 IV7 I I in E
im7 bVII7 IV IV or Bm

Some ambiguity around the tonality. I would go for E as the tonic. But I can play the same chords and get Bm feeling like the root. You could view the Bm7 as "borrowed" from the parallel Em scale and the IV7 as a non functioning secondary dominant.

It's not a big deal if it's not "in key" as long as it sounds good.
Si
#8
i think you should change the last chord to a F#, just so that it resolves to a perfect fifth and then the perfect fifth resolves to the root. that would make this a lot easier =P
#9
Nah if everyone changed all their chords to be diatonic and end with a V-I resolution it might make things "easier" but we wouldn't have any very interesting music.
Si
#10
Quote by 20Tigers
Nah if everyone changed all their chords to be diatonic and end with a V-I resolution it might make things "easier" but we wouldn't have any very interesting music.
I disagree. A good composer who can write awesome melodies with awesome note choice and phrasing can make a V-I progression sound great.

it doesn't necessarily but with rock or pop based music, more often than not, the key will be the first chord used. It just seems to work out that way. Obviously not 100% correct, but it is usually a good place to start from if you have no idea.
Saying things like this, although right just over half the time, is misleading. Take this very popular pop progression: ii, V7, I. Some people would say that's in whatever minor chord ii would happen to be.

To T/S
It doesn't seem like it's a diatonic progression, perhaps you shouldn't write diatonically with it? What are you trying to do with the progression? Like are you going to sing over it or improvise over it? If you're improvising, maybe you should slow the progression down and play the changes?
#11
Quote by demonofthenight
I disagree. A good composer who can write awesome melodies with awesome note choice and phrasing can make a V-I progression sound great.

Yeah you are right. V-I is an awesome progression that always sounds good. And no doubt is the core of many great, varied, interesting works.

What I was trying to say is that we shouldn't feel a need to rewrite a piece or a passage we are happy with just to include that chord change. Investigating, exploring, and experimenting with other ideas is the kind of mindset that brings fresh ideas to the table whether it be V-I or not.
Si
#12
Quote by 20Tigers
Yeah you are right. V-I is an awesome progression that always sounds good. And no doubt is the core of many great, varied, interesting works.

What I was trying to say is that we shouldn't feel a need to rewrite a piece or a passage we are happy with just to include that chord change. Investigating, exploring, and experimenting with other ideas is the kind of mindset that brings fresh ideas to the table whether it be V-I or not.


If I'm not mistaken, you're trying to say that we should not change something we're happy with just to make it diatonic? In which case I totally agree, just trying to clarify
#15
Quote by gt4068
Could the key of A major work as a ii I V V?
I guess, but ii doesn't really resolve that well to I.
#16
I've been playing the lick for a few minutes, and I gotta say, it sounds pretty good, so props for that. As for key, I'd have to agree with gt4068 that it is in Amaj. The I - IV - V progression would go A - D - E, and since Bm is the relative minor of D, it fits as well.
#17
Seems to resolve to a Dmajor chord fairly well.
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