#1
Ummmm, I seem to have lost my notes with modes listed on them , could someone list all the modes and what I need to know about them?

Thanks.
#2
This and more is covered in the theory sticky and the Crusades articles (hosted on this site). The search feature should reveal a few (thousand) threads as well.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Ionian 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
Dorian 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
Phrygian 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7
Mixolydian 1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
Aeolian 1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
Locrian 1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 (i think this is right, im not sure about locrian cause i never use it.)


They are in order, like Ionian starts on the first degree of the major scale, Dorian on the second, all the way to Locrian on the seventh.


EDIT: wow i did that all from memory, im friggin proud of myself =]
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Nov 30, 2008,
#4
Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
EDIT: wow i did that all from memory, im friggin proud of myself =]

Now do the harmonic minor modes and melodic minor modes by memmory
#6
There's a myriad of sources to get your information on modes from. The only thing is, it's rather complicated theory, and every source tries to explain it in layman's terms but in a different way... Every guide focuses on something else. You might wanna read more than one article on the diatonic modes, to completely understand what they exactly are.
#7
here's a few helpful links:

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php - - all the scales you could ever want and a lot more.

http://www.godrex.com/majormodes.htm - a modes chart I've found very useful when wanting to experiment with modes.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZTQolymKmDA
www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCdZwASSKuk - Joe Satriani talking about modes and ways to think about them. These videos really helped me get ideas and better understand what I could do with modes.
#8
Quote by demonofthenight

Now do the harmonic minor modes and melodic minor modes by memmory

i could do the harmonic minor by memory.
but definately not the melodic.
i never use the melodic so i never really bothered to study it
my 6 best friends:
Ibanez Artcore AF75
Schecter C-1 Hellraiser
LTD H-207 7 string
Ibanez Acoustic
#9
Right here we go...Modes de-mystified. NOTE: This deals only with the Modes of the Major Scale.

To begin with try to understand the major scale as a step pattern.
W W H W W W H. I am guessing you have this down already and understand it perfectly.

Now a modes are simply a matter of using the same pattern but a different root from along the pattern (thereby starting at a different place in the step pattern). So the step pattern above is the 1st mode of the Major Scale step pattern and is called Ionian.

If we start at the second place along the same pattern we get the second mode (Dorian) which will look like this:
W H W W W H W Compare this to the original Ionian step pattern and make sure you understand I got this Dorian mode.

Starting at the 3rd place in the pattern you get
H W W W H W W. This is the third mode Phrygian.

Write down the step patterns for all the modes. They are called Ionian Dorian Phrygian Lydian Mixolydian Aeolian Locrian. There are seven in total.

It is common to get caught up on relative modes (i.e. comparing C Ionian A Aeolian we'll get to this soon). But of more importance is to first concentrate on how changing the step pattern affects the intervals in relation to the root note.

If W W H W W W H is our Ionian Mode our notes will be
1 2 3 4 5 6 7. Notice there are no sharps or flats – because all the intervals here are major or perfect it is equivalent to the Major Scale.

If we look at our second mode the Dorian Mode the step pattern starts with the second step so looks like this = W H W W W H W
We can see the half steps are in a different place so this will change the distance between the root and some of the notes making them sharp or flat. What we end up with is
1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7

If you compare this to the Ionian Mode (Major Scale) you will notice the intervals between the scale degrees change.

For example the distance between the 1st and 3rd scale degrees has changed from two Whole Steps in Ionian Mode to one Whole and one Half step in Dorian Mode. The 3rd scale degree is now a minor third interval and this is noted with the b3.

Despite this change in the distance from the root to the 3rd degree, notice that the total distance between root and the fourth is still the same as in our Ionian Mode (Major Scale). The only other difference between Dorian (the second mode) and Ionian apart from the b3 is that the 7th is also minor in the Dorian Mode.

The Phrygian Mode = H W W W H W W
The notes are 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7.
You will see this retains the b7 and b3 of the Dorian Mode but now the 2 and 6 are also flatted creating minor 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th intervals.

I don't know if you notice a pattern here but there is one.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7
1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7
the next item in this pattern is b1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7. However what we call our root note is not important since the point of writing scales in this way is to measure the distance between the root and each scale degree. Hence we can keep the same interval structure between the notes b1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 by writing it as 1 2 3 #4 5 6 7. This is actually easier to understand since if our root note is C it is C and not Cb. I only wrote it the first way to show how the pattern works...and if we carry on...

Now lets see the last thing we flatted was the 5 and the 1. So for the next mode we will have to flat the 4 and the 7.
1 2 3 4 5 6 b7
Then we flat the 6 and the 3
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 (look familiar??)
and then we flat the 5 and 2
1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 (Locrian)
and then we flat the 4 and 1
b1 b2 b3 b4 b5 b6 b7 - hey wait there's a b1 lets rewrite this keeping the same interval structure between the notes = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We are back to the start.

So here they are again without all the writing:
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Ionian
1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 Dorian
1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 Phrygian
1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 Lydian
1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 Mixolydian
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 Aeolian
1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 Locrian

If you look at the intervals you will notice some important similarities which we turn to now.
Three of them have perfect fifth and major third intervals (This results in the tonic triad being major in quality). These are considered Major Modes.

Three of them have perfect fifth and minor third intervals (This results in the tonic triad being minor in quality. These are considered the minor Modes.

The Locrian has a diminished fifth and minor third intervals. (This results in the tonic triad being diminished in quality). This is the diminished mode.

There is no Augmented Mode.

However if we group these off into Major Minor and Diminished groups you will notice there is only a slight difference between modes of the same quality:
Major Modes
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 = Ionian
1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 = Lydian
1 2 3 4 5 6 b7 = Mixolydian
You can see the difference between Lydian and Ionian is the #4 in the Lydian. This differentiating note is often referred to as the Modal Note.
The Modal note of the Mixolydian is the b7 since it is this note that makes it different than the Ionian mode.
Changing just one note in this way will retain the core "Major" sound with the flat third and perfect fifth but will bring a slightly different flavour to the scale.


Minor Modes
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 = Aeolian
1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 = Dorian
1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 = Phrygian
The Aeolian is the minor mode to which the other minor modes are compared. See if you can work out the modal note of the Dorian and Phrygian Modes. (Hint: fill in the blank “The (Dorian/Phrygian) mode is like the Aeolian mode with a ________.)

Diminished Mode
1 b2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7 = Locrian modal note of the Locrian mode is the b5 since it is the only mode to have a b5 and consequently is a either a bit of a lone wolf or just a big ol' reject!

The best way to get to know modes is to learn the relationship between Parallel Modes.
Parallel Modes are modes that use the same root.
So C Ionian, C Dorian, C Phrygian, C Lydian, C Mixolydian, C Aeolian, and C Locrian are all parallel modes. Learning how to construct each of these and how each of them sound is important.

A Relative Modal relationship is when two modes use the same notes. Hence C Ionian, D Dorian, and A Aeolian are all Relative Modes. We can see this if we write them out.

Let’s start with C Ionian. Well this is just our major scale so C Ionian = 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 = C D E F G A B.
D Dorian is the Aeolian Mode with a restored natural sixth.
1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7 = D E F G A B C.
A Aeolian is the A natural Minor Scale
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 = A B C D E F G

As we can see D Dorian is a D rooted mode/scale that uses the same notes as the C major scale (which is a C rooted scale). The C Major scale is said to be the parent scale since it is the Major Scale that contains the same notes as all the “relative” modes. This is an important relationship to be aware of and understand. Knowing how to find the "Parent Scale" of a given mode is crucial. It makes it a lot simpler to know when you are learning the patterns on your fretboard.

The problem with relative modes is that people think it is a shortcut to learning modes. They think if they learn the Relative Modes for each major scale they will know modes. Unfortunately all they really end up knowing is the major scale. You really need to take the time to understand how the modes are constructed and the similarities and differences between the parallel modes (modes with the same root). Then you will be better set to really use modes well.

There are three basic ways to use Modes.
1. As a source of melodic ideas over specific chords in a progression. For this to work you need the chord to last long enough to fully develop a melodic idea. You will also need to have a good knowledge of chord construction and which modes will work over what chords.

The modes that work over a certain chord will be the modes that naturally spell out that chord. So over a Xmaj7 chord you will be looking for a mode with a 1 3 5 7 which would be a major mode. Of the three Mixolydian will NOT naturally spell out this chord because it has a b7. Either the Lydian or Ionian will work over that chord.

A chord such as Xm9 would need a mode that has 1 2(9) b3 5 b7 The flat third makes it a minor mode we are looking for, and it has to have a natural 2 so either Aeolian or Dorian will work but Phrygian will not since it contains a b2.

This way of playing is ideal when there are a lot of “out of key” or non-diatonic chords in a progression.

2. As a source of melodic ideas over modal chord progressions. This is where a mode is used to create melodies over a harmony built from the same mode. Most or all of our chords here will be built by harmonizing a specific mode and the progression will be constructed so as to highlight the right root note. We then use the mode as a melodic tool over the entire chord progression.

3. As altered scales. Certain chord progressions will create an expectation for certain modes or scales to be used. Flavour can be added by using a different mode than the one expected. This has to be done with care though as if done wrong it will bomb.

The idea here is that you will start introducing new notes from outside the key of scale that the chord or progression might imply in order to achieve a specific effect. This is where knowing your major and minor mode groups is good. This is the most difficult since you are more likely to have clashes and when such clashes are not played with confidence they can cause a wreck.
Si
Last edited by 20Tigers at Dec 12, 2008,
#10
Alright, cool, more help that I asked for.
Thanks a lot guys
I'm copying and pasting 20Tigers's reply in a word document and printing so I'll always have it for reference!
#11
I would also quote that whole thing in future threads asking about modes, because that is a very comprehensive lesson he typed up there. Thank you 20! Amazing post.
Got Death Magnetic a day early!

The Low-Cardinal of Zeppelinism - If you're a diehard fan of Zeppelin, join Zeppelinism here


Winner of the "Biggest Led Zeppelin Fuck" award in the CR forum (2 years running!)
#14
Um...you're welcome - glad to help. Those are just my notes on modes that I already had on word processor and written mostly for myself. I made a few changes here and there and then just did the old copy and paste. Some of it has been posted in other threads. It's what some might call a "living document" - which if you haven't heard that term before means that it is continuously changing and evolving.

So you may want to read lot's of other views on modes and make your own notes so you are sure you understand it. Cheers

Happy to share though good luck
Si
#15
Quote by :-D
What's that?
I think he meant "mammory"


Nice post 20... even though TS could look at the sticky like Archeo said.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
#16
Quote by demonofthenight

Now do the harmonic minor modes and melodic minor modes by memmory


Harmonic minor modes:
Ionian augmented something-1 2 3 4 #5 6 7
Dorian something-1 2 b3 #4 5 6 b7
Phrigian Dominant- 1 b2 3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian something-1 #2 3 #4 5 6 7
Mixolydian something-1 b2 b3 b4 b5 b6 bb7
Harmonic minor-1 2 b3 4 5 b6 7
Locrian something-1 b2 b3 4 b5 6 b7

Melodic minor modes-
Ionian something-1 2 3 #4 #5 6 7
Dorian something-1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7
Phrigian Dominant- 1 2 3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian something-1 2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7
Mixolydian something-1 b2 b3 b4 b5 b6 b7
Melodic minor-1 2 b3 4 5 6 7
Locrian something-1 b2 b3 4 5 6 b7


I don't remember the names though (probably they are silly anyways, like superlocrian against the Abomin-or-ation or something)
#17
Ionian something-1 2 3 #4 #5 6 7
Dorian something-1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7
Phrigian Dominant- 1 2 3 4 5 b6 b7
Lydian something-1 2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7
Mixolydian something-1 b2 b3 b4 b5 b6 b7
Melodic minor-1 2 b3 4 5 6 7
Locrian something-1 b2 b3 4 5 6 b7


Lydian augmented-1 2 3 #4 #5 6 7
Lydian dominant-1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7
Mixolydian b6 (or melodic major, or aeolian dominant)- 1 2 3 4 5 b6 b7
Locrian nat. 2-1 2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7
Altered-1 b2 b3 b4 b5 b6 b7
Melodic minor-1 2 b3 4 5 6 7
Phrygian nat. 6-1 b2 b3 4 5 6 b7
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#18
20tigers, that is one of the best lessons on modes I've read.


And gonzaw thanks for posting the intervals of the harmonic and melodic minor modes. I can never seem to remember those.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#19
Quote by metal4all
I think he meant "mammory"
Yep, I wanted him to grow tits, start lactating and squirt out the modes of the melodic minor scale.

Lydian augmented-1 2 3 #4 #5 6 7
Lydian dominant-1 2 3 #4 5 6 b7
Mixolydian b6 (or melodic major, or aeolian dominant)- 1 2 3 4 5 b6 b7
Locrian nat. 2-1 2 b3 4 b5 b6 b7
Altered-1 b2 b3 b4 b5 b6 b7
Melodic minor-1 2 b3 4 5 6 7
Phrygian nat. 6-1 b2 b3 4 5 6 b7
It's mixolydian b6, not aeolian dominant. That modes based of the mixolydian mode.

The next ones aeolian diminished. This mode is based of the aeolian mode.

The one after melodic minor is more like dorian flat second.

If you haven't noticed, the mode which each melodic minor mode is based of is in the same order as the major modes. So if I was to chart it, it would look like this.

Major Ionian->Ionian flat third (melodic minor mode)
Dorian->Dorian flat second
Phrygian->Phrygian flat root (probably better known as Lydian augmented though)
Lydian->Lydian flat seventh
Mixolydian->Mixolydian flat sixth
Aeolian->Aeolian flat fifth
Locrian->Locrian flat fourth (aka superlocrian, altered dominant and so on)

Notice any other patterns (as in, which intervals are flattened for a mode to become a melodic minor mode)? I'll leave that question to you. Hopefully this is all coming together in some peoples heads.

And really nice article 20tigers. It's great that you wrote a bit at the end of how to actually use modes, this is where alot of articles fall short imo. I might copy it and spam it in mode threads (with your name at the bottom of course).
#20
It's mixolydian b6, not aeolian dominant. That modes based of the mixolydian mode.

The next ones aeolian diminished. This mode is based of the aeolian mode.

The one after melodic minor is more like dorian flat second.

If you haven't noticed, the mode which each melodic minor mode is based of is in the same order as the major modes. So if I was to chart it, it would look like this.

Major Ionian->Ionian flat third (melodic minor mode)
Dorian->Dorian flat second
Phrygian->Phrygian flat root (probably better known as Lydian augmented though)
Lydian->Lydian flat seventh
Mixolydian->Mixolydian flat sixth
Aeolian->Aeolian flat fifth
Locrian->Locrian flat fourth (aka superlocrian, altered dominant and so on)


No, they are not based off of the diatonic modes. They are entirely different. If you start talking about things like "phrygian flat root", no one is going to know what you're talking about. Naming them based on their intervalic structure not only makes far more sense, it's how just about everyone refers to them.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#21
Quote by demonofthenight
Yep, I wanted him to grow tits, start lactating and squirt out the modes of the melodic minor scale.

It's mixolydian b6, not aeolian dominant. That modes based of the mixolydian mode.

The next ones aeolian diminished. This mode is based of the aeolian mode.

The one after melodic minor is more like dorian flat second.

If you haven't noticed, the mode which each melodic minor mode is based of is in the same order as the major modes. So if I was to chart it, it would look like this.

Major Ionian->Ionian flat third (melodic minor mode)
Dorian->Dorian flat second
Phrygian->Phrygian flat root (probably better known as Lydian augmented though)
Lydian->Lydian flat seventh
Mixolydian->Mixolydian flat sixth
Aeolian->Aeolian flat fifth
Locrian->Locrian flat fourth (aka superlocrian, altered dominant and so on)

Notice any other patterns (as in, which intervals are flattened for a mode to become a melodic minor mode)? I'll leave that question to you. Hopefully this is all coming together in some peoples heads.

And really nice article 20tigers. It's great that you wrote a bit at the end of how to actually use modes, this is where alot of articles fall short imo. I might copy it and spam it in mode threads (with your name at the bottom of course).



Patterns?
But in which way? You just made melodic minor an ionian mode, instead of an aeolian one. YOu mean by doing that?