#1
Well I know the most appropriate thing to do would be to talk to my teacher, but I don't feel like it. So if there are any people who speak German, please help. I'm in my third year and I don't understand the genitive case at all. Like when do you use it? The teacher has gone over it countless times but I still don't get it. I know if it's two syllables you add an s at the end or some shit but other than that.....
Quote by NGD1313
Well I don't know about solos but how about that Smoke on the Water riff. It's like...impossible.


THE TRUTH IS OUT THERE

I'm Jake. I'm a musician, philosopher, and exhibitionist.
#4
Well, if it's anything like Latin, the genitive case is used for ownership and can generally be translated "of _____" or "_______'s" or in rare cases "from ________."

This is what I've learned about latin, however, and as far as I know (which in the field of grammar ain't much) may not apply to German.
#5
ok, i'll try to explain

the genitive case is used to denote possession, for example, if you wanted to say "the baby's toy" you would write

das Spielzeug des Babys (object first, then the possessor, so this translates to the toy of the baby essentially)

for the thing that is doing the possessing, you change the article as follows
der, das -> des (then add an 's' if 2+ syllables, 'es' if one)
die - > der (don't add 's' or 'es')

hope this helps
Between the velvet lies, there's a truth as hard as steel.
The vision never dies, life's a neverending wheel.
#6
Generally means "of ...". Is also taken by some prepositions.

Masculine and neuter nouns: take des/eines/meines etc. and add -s or -es to end of noun (generally whichever sounds better). Feminine and plural nouns: take der/einer/meiner etc. and don't change noun.
#7
Quote by Skierinanutshel
it shows ownership

like,

"des auto der mann"

the man's car.

(its been two years since i've taken a german class, so i may be a bit off)


You nailed it. Just remember, masculine and neuter -es or -s, fem and plural -r or -er.
#8
Its to show ownership of something.

the articles are des, der, des, der for masculine, feminine, neuter, and plural respectively

You usually have to add an "s" or sometimes an "es" to the end of the noun that is doing the "owning" if it is masculine.


the correct example that Skierinanutshel used would be (at least I'm pretty sure its correct)

Der Auto des Mannes - The man's car, or the car of the man
Originally Posted by NAME GOES HERE
Dude, with a name like Cannibal Corpse, what were you expecting? Ponies and rainbows?

#9
Quote by lpguitarplayer3


the correct example that Skierinanutshel used would be (at least I'm pretty sure its correct)

Der Auto des Mannes - The man's car, or the car of the man


hey-oh! i was close

thats what i get for not continuing the language in the presence of science.
#10
Quote by Skierinanutshel
hey-oh! i was close

thats what i get for not continuing the language in the presence of science.


its all good lol

I almost believed you for a bit haha

I took 4 years so I kinda know what I'm talking about...but I'm pretty sure I died trying to learn subjunctive I...and barely remember subjunctive II so if I use it I usually just make it up hahaha
Originally Posted by NAME GOES HERE
Dude, with a name like Cannibal Corpse, what were you expecting? Ponies and rainbows?

#11
du hast mich ?
Cette nuit j'ai rêvé que je mâchais ses yeux
Après avoir crevé par accès de furie
Ta replète panse d'helminthes blancs nourrie,
Trop prompte à déféquer le fruit d'un vit sanieux.
#12
Hallo!, Mein name ist Hayden..

That's all I know, I did a full year of German and failed EVERY part