#3
yes and no
they are useful for ideas within your own writing
but they arent a subsitute for theory work on scales

as for technique, not really
like i said before scales are a better way to learn good technique
most people find them boring
personally i enjoy it
#4
Well what would you want to use your "technique" for if not to play solos? Yes learning solos is helpful for improving technique and showing how to use the technique in practice.

Technique specific training exercises are useful for ironing out kinks and rounding out your skills.
Si
#5
well..i know a good bit of music theory and have an excellent ear, but my technique is ****. i can play scales fast, but all i'm doing is playing scales fast.

if i wanted to learn how to shred, wouldn't learning shred songs and solos teach me more than blazing through random exercises?
#6
Quote by takeitback90
well..i know a good bit of music theory and have an excellent ear, but my technique is ****. i can play scales fast, but all i'm doing is playing scales fast.

if i wanted to learn how to shred, wouldn't learning shred songs and solos teach me more than blazing through random exercises?


there is a difference between just practising scales
and putting it to use
you should be doing double strokes, triplets, arpeggio's within the scales. there is a hundred different ways to practice scales.

from there you play around with the scale by getting a backing track or a song thats within the same key and you learn to improvise

im not saying dont learn solo's
because it will help you
but scale work will help you a lot more than learning solos
you will learn more about the solo's you're playing

people who shread dont learn by practicing others solo's
shreading comes from your knowledge of scales

another tip i can give and i know its on a couple posts
but dont practice slow
always push yourself to go faster
thats the only way you'll learn to shred
#7
Quote by takeitback90
well..i know a good bit of music theory and have an excellent ear, but my technique is ****. i can play scales fast, but all i'm doing is playing scales fast.

if i wanted to learn how to shred, wouldn't learning shred songs and solos teach me more than blazing through random exercises?


i had the same problem. just learn a lot of solos. some good ones to learn are children of bodom. alexi laiho has a lot of shifting, string skipping, arpegiating, and other usefull little licks that have given me a lot of ideas.

shred=more usage in shifting and moderate string skipping
classic rock (25 or 6 to 4 by chicago is EXELLENT!)= swift string skipping and fast little licks here and there that really zazz up your playing

i could be slightly wrong about some of that, but hell, i just have fun with it. solos are way better than scales Imo, with scales, you cant zazz it up

haha zazz
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#8
Learning anything is going to improve your knowledge and by default your technique - even if its how to get a good sound by rubbing your big toe up and down the 6th string

Personally, I have got through the last 17 yrs or so doing whatever I felt like doing at the time. Sometimes I would learn scales, sometimes I would learn solos.

When I would come to write or improv - scales arpeggios, chords etc would give me the framework, other peoples riffs, the melodies/ harmonies etc would provide ideas.

Unless you are hell bent on becoming a session muso shred head, I would take a bit more of a relaxed approach. If you want to try something - try it, if you get bored and want to do something else - then go for it.

instictivley, you will lean towards wanting to learn the things you want to learn - sounds to me like you wanna learn some solos..., and i know what i'd be doing right now I were in your shoes...
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#9
learn some scales ;D
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#11
Learning solos is useful so that you can apply techniques in practice, can analyse them to see what gives them a certain sound you like, will give you a better idea of what makes solos sound good or bad, will give you new ideas for you own solos, and gives you a chance to show off to your friends
#12
Thanks you guys, some really great answers.

I figure at this point I'll just learn and practice a bit of both.
#13
Quote by AJ18
yes and no
they are useful for ideas within your own writing
but they arent a subsitute for theory work on scales

as for technique, not really
like i said before scales are a better way to learn good technique

most people find them boring
personally i enjoy it


Absolutely not true. Playing scales all day teaches you how to play a scale all day. Solos will (hopefully) improve technique and "musical" ability.

Now, learning scales and learning to recognize them on the neck is an entirely different matter. That will help you understand the song that you're playing from a theoretical and playing point of view.
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#14
Quote by DaddyTwoFoot
Absolutely not true. Playing scales all day teaches you how to play a scale all day.


Absolutely not true. Or, absolutely true. The dependency is on how you actually go
about practicing scales. They can open up a lot of new ground, or leave you stuck on
covering the same ground over and over. But that's a property of the practicER and
not scale practice.
#15
Quote by edg
Absolutely not true. Or, absolutely true. The dependency is on how you actually go
about practicing scales. They can open up a lot of new ground, or leave you stuck on
covering the same ground over and over. But that's a property of the practicER and
not scale practice.


In my second paragraph, I made sure to note the importance of learning scales. What I meant by practicing scales was running up and down a 3 note-per-string box, which I assumed the person I quoted to also mean.
Quote by dudetheman
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#16
IMO, learning other people's solos is very useful. Every guitarist has his own comfort zone. When you learn someone else's comfort zone, not your own, and wind up expanding your comfort zone to include new stuff. For the same reason, learning solos is great for uncovering where the weakness in your playing are and addressing them. Most of the exercises I play these days come from learning solos and having difficulties and needing some exercise that focuses in isolation on the problem.

But don't learn only the solos, learn the whole song. The goal really is to get 4-5 minutes of music (whether your own or a cover) sounding really badass, not 15 secs of lead (ok, 1.5 minutes if covering anything from the 80s!).
#17
I'm just going over technique, if that makes any sense.

I know most of the scales, the theory behind them, and what they sound good over. I'm just talking about different things found in solos that I can apply to my playing. I guess it could help with phrasing as long as I'm not totally ripping somebody off.

Edit: btw if i'm learning a piece would upping it 10 bpm a week be too much?
Last edited by takeitback90 at Dec 2, 2008,