#1
Hey guys.
Ive been playing for about two years this xmas.
I play metal just mainly learn songs and thats it.
but its now where learning music theory would be nice so i can write my own songs ect...
I would have learned theory in the past but tbh its allways scared the **** out of me seems really complex.. so how did you guys get started and where can i look to find basic theory?
Thanks
Stew
my gear:
jackson dk2m
ibanez grg170dx.
peavey vyper 15
warwick corvette 5 string
ashdown 5 15
#2
Hey,

Glad you want to look into theory, it's really an important basis of good playing!

I'm writing an all-in-one guide to guitar here on UG, it's called "the Ultimate Guide to Guitar"... It covers theory as well as practice, from the basics to the more advanced concepts.

It's a work in progress though, and only the beginning articles have been written, but if you just started looking into theory you may want to check them out. The newest article comes out today, it's on diatonic scales... This may be a VERY valuable article for you if you're new to theory!

So I suggest you read them all from start to finish.. The link is in my sig! It's very obvious

Cheers!
ZeG
#3
Look in my sig. Basically, my lessons move from the idea that

A) a single note can be moved across strings (eg, 5th fret low E is the same sound, or pitch, as the open A string)

B) notes repeat in "octaves"

to learning the notes across the fretboard, at which stage you should be much more ready to take on the crusade articles which are also linked in my sig.
#6
Quote by stew91
Hey guys.
Ive been playing for about two years this xmas.
I play metal just mainly learn songs and thats it.
but its now where learning music theory would be nice so i can write my own songs ect...
I would have learned theory in the past but tbh its allways scared the **** out of me seems really complex.. so how did you guys get started and where can i look to find basic theory?
Thanks
Stew
Earned my respect

In this order: Learn theory, find a melody writing/analysis book, study songs from bands you like, learn counterpoint.

By far the best free (everything free tastes so much better) is on the column section of this site and it's called "the crusades" by josh urban. You know it's actually good because someone with no affiliation to urban is endorising it.

You can find melody writing books and melody analysis books at your local library. Some libraries suck, so you might have to go to two or three libraries. Or, you could wait a few months for me to finish my free melody writing article (I'm so lazy).

I put counterpoint in that list because it can be usefull. Personally I find it interesting and if you're a commited song writer you'll probably enjoy it too. Counterpoint is amazingly difficult, so don't expect to be able to launch right into it.
#7
+1 to the Crusade, probably the best written articles on UG.
Actually called Mark!

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#10
Quote by SeeEmilyPlay
No joke- Music Theory for Dummies! It's an easy book to follow. There's a lot of information in it and you'll atleast pick up on a few things.


The For Dummies books are actually pretty good, they explain everything in layman's terms and cover a surprisingly big amount of theory! I don't have the Music Theory for Dummies but I do have Guitar for Dummies, which taught me a lot as well when I started out
#11
Give this guy a cookie! He plays metal in todays generation and isnt obsessed with repeating the current sound! hehe I like you :]

I dont know what to do to help you though man. I already knew basic theory when I picked up guitar so I just kinda took it from there.
But I will say this. And listen up, cus thats the key to learning anything. Listen. Take information wherever you can get it. Thats how you learn without being turned into a product of the machine.
#12
hey guys i play for 1 year and im interested in learning theory.....like.....how do you guys know those complikated chords with the complikated names ????
#15
Well, there are names for naming distances between notes.

These are intervals.

If you understand the distances between notes you can describe chords and scales very quickly, and you will know in advance what they sound like.

So, a maj chord has a root note, a major third and a perfect fifth in it. Then if you see "add6" it means add a major 6th to the chord as well, and so on and so forth.
#16
sounds easy to you....but.....im a cmplete beginner when it comes to chords theory
#18
I'd look at Freepower's and ZeGuitarist's lessons, and also look in the theory sticky at the top of this forum, that covers many things also.

I also reccomend "Al Di Meola's guide to Chords, Scales and Arpeggios" it really is a great book when it comes to the sections of theory listed in the title.

EDIT: The book is rubbish if you know no theory at all, I'd only buy it once you know a bit. The book focuses on, for example, expanding your chord 'vocabulary', but assumes that you already understand how the chords are constructed and stuff like that.
Last edited by michal23 at Dec 1, 2008,