#1
so if i have a em pentatonic i have worked out how to go up and down the neck on the high e but could i also play the same frets on the b string without killing everything?

also would it also kill everything if i shifted from the aeolian-phygrian-dorian in mid solo (like use the notes)?
Quote by Vauxite
Lots of lulz were produced, thankyou good sir
#2
so if i have a em pentatonic i have worked out how to go up and down the neck on the high e but could i also play the same frets on the b string without killing everything?


You would be playing completely different notes, and would very likely be out of key. I strongly suggest learning the notes on the fretboard and getting yourself a good theory teacher.

also would it also kill everything if i shifted from the aeolian-phygrian-dorian in mid solo (like use the notes)?


Modes don't work that way. You aren't ready to be worrying about things like this. Focus on learning the major scale all over the neck, in every key, as well as the theory behind it.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#3
Quote by Archeo Avis
Focus on learning the major scale all over the neck, in every key, as well as the theory behind it.


erm i know it.
Quote by Vauxite
Lots of lulz were produced, thankyou good sir
#4
well obviously not very well, if you're asking why you can't figure out how to spread the notes of a scale across the fretboard.


Learn the NOTES/Chords of the scale. Then you wont be confused anymore

for example, Eminor Penatonic.

Eminor, Gmajor, Aminor, Bminor, D major.
#5
so if i have a em pentatonic i have worked out how to go up and down the neck on the high e but could i also play the same frets on the b string without killing everything?

also would it also kill everything if i shifted from the aeolian-phygrian-dorian in mid solo (like use the notes)?


The same frets on the B string whilst in the key of E minor? Not all of them.

The modal shift you are attempting, what is it you are playing over a static E bass note and no chord or what? There is more information as to what you are playing over before the choices can be analysed.
#6
Quote by wigzwamz
erm i know it.


Your thread says otherwise.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#7
Learn how the major scale works. Not just the pattern. Learn how chords are formed from scales. Then go on to do the same for minor scale(s) because they work slightly different and there are different harmonic conventions. Then go on to modes.
#8
Quote by Arch
Modes don't work that way.
They could if you're using a playing the changes approach to improvising.
But you wouldn't use them in the same phrase. You wouldn't want to use m6's with M6's or m2's with M2's in the same phrase, unless you're doing a chromatic run. Otherwise, I don't see why not.

T/S, please learn your theory before you attempt modes. Theory isn't learning shapes. Keep in mind you are playing notes and intervals, not frets.
#9
They could if you're using a playing the changes approach to improvising.


In which case you're not playing modally. The use of modal terms is just useful in that contexts to communicate the use of specific notes over specific chords.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#10
^ specific notes or intervals Archeo?

I think what Demon was saying (what I understood it to be anyway) was say taking an A7 chord and playing what would be called by most people A mixolydian over it, major scale with a b7. Then taking a new chord say Dm7 and playing D Dorian over it, b3 & b7. This is what I perceived it as, and I know strictly speaking people wouldn't call this modal playing, but how else would you describe the scales being played? Would you actually just say "play major but flatten the seventh" or "play major and flatten the 3rd and 7th" and avoid the modal name for such an intervallic sequence? I'm not stirring the pot here but rather trying to get it clear in my own head, as I would say "play mixolydian over that" (talking dominant 7 chords). This is just an example, to allow you to use each 'mode' (or altered scales if you prefer) you would need to play each chord long enough to develop your scale over it.

To Ts I recommend getting to know the relationship between the notes on different strings. You sound like where I was at 3 months into starting to play guitar. Where I would follow an Iron maiden melody on 1 string and be lost when I had to play a note lower than the string would go.
Last edited by Helpy Helperton at Dec 2, 2008,