#1
I've come to the realization today that maybe the reason I've not been up to the level of other bassists abilities (the ones I know personally) is because I've got a really bad left hand habit of freting the neck at an angle rather then straight on parralle. I have average size hands too. I see my freinds pull off some amazing **** on their basses, like RHCP, Claypool solo type playing that I can't even touch. I tend to be a regular "pocket" bassist myself. But one thing i noticed is that their fingers streatch wider then mine and are dead even on the frets, where mine are slanted because it's most comfy for me because I was used to smaller necks on guitars, but I guess this is a horrible way to fret the neck. Doing it dead even is almost like being a begginer again. BTW i never had formal bass lessons before, so I just winged some techniques but Is there a way I can fix this handicap in my left hand?
#2
1. Forget everything you know and reteach yourself with proper technique.
2. Get real hands, not pizza hands. lolseewatididthar
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#4
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
A picture of how you play would be very helpful. It's hard to say otherwise.


or a video if possible (though i'd not be the one to help you much)
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#5
Yeah, some visuals would help. But if I get what I think you're saying, it may be that you don't actually have a problem.
In the first place, remember that being 'in the pocket' is what the majority of bass playing is about, the majority of the time. It's no shame not to pull off a stunning solo!
If that's your aim (and why not? No-one should ever stop learning and striving for better), then it takes time and work.
For a start, make sure your thumb is vertical up the back of the neck, with the pads at the base of your fingers just touching the underside of the neck. Always ensure that your bass is at an appropriate height and angle for you. The last thing you need is to start causing pain and possible long-term harm to yourself.
Regularly do stretching exercises to your hands and wrists. That way, you'll build the foundations of good technique, and avoid carpal tunnel problems. Do opposition and dexterity exercises to build your fine control.
When you do scales, and the speed building exercises in the UG lessons section, watch where your fingertips get to. As long as the tip comes up to the back of the fret, you should be ok. Try seeing how lightly you can fret the string, before it buzzes - saving physical effort might help.
Like I say, I'm not sure you have a problem: it's not relearning, just a bit of behaviour modification!
For what it's worth, I do identify with your case. I'm self taught on bass, with smallish hands, and I did have bad habits. Namely, Using the Grip of Death, and hooking my thumb over the top. I got past them, and so can you. Only once you've got them sorted out, can you decide to go further. Or not!
#6
Your fingers need to be more dexterous to play like that.

There is nothing wrong with how you are playing, though.

Just be concious about it when you play and over time you will straighten up. Dont worry, its no biggie.
#7
Maybe the reason you're not as good as your friends is because you don't practice as much. I've only recently come to the realization that practicing isn't fun for some people. How often do you practice TS?
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So does you
#8
Quote by Applehead
Your fingers need to be more dexterous to play like that.

There is nothing wrong with how you are playing, though.

Just be concious about it when you play and over time you will straighten up. Dont worry, its no biggie.

+1 truth
Gear:
Washburn RB2500 (5 String)
Yamaha BB400 Fretless (1981)
Carlo Giordano 3/4 Upright (White)
Cort Action 4 (Stereo-fied)
Orange Bass Terror 500
Orange 1x15 Cab
Boss GT-6 Bass Multi-effects