#1
Alright hey guys,
I've noticed that every time I replace my strings on my acoustic, the action gets worse every time (at first it didn't bother me, but the last time i did it, the action was so high I just wanted to stop playing it all together)
Now, I'm not sure if I'm just changing my strings weird or it's something else.
Any suggestions on what's wrong, or if I can fix this myself?
#2
Are you using thicker strings? If you are you may need to adjust your truss rod to compensate.
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ESP Eclipse
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#3
It sounds like your putting on higher gauge strings each time. What type of guitar do you have?? Strings and whatnot?
Quote by ravioli123
James, a type of sandwich:

A sandwich that consists of ham, turkey, roast beef, shredded cheese, nacho cheese doritos, and ranch on a toasted bun.
"Hey man lets go get a couple James's for lunch"
#4
Maybe the neck is slowly curving.
Check that it's still straight, and straighten it if it isn't
Quote by Retro Rocker


....


haha

*wipes tear from eye*
Oh you're good.
#5
Quote by ravioli123
It sounds like your putting on higher gauge strings each time. What type of guitar do you have?? Strings and whatnot?

Well I play an Ibanez AW30 and I've been using .13 gauge strings. (I switched from 11's to 13's but I didn't notice the action getting worse when I made the switch, and that was a long time ago)

^And how can I straighten out the guitar properly? (I'm kinda scared I'll hurt and or break the guitar haha)
#6
Mabye your string replacemant technique is lacking in the gentility an acoustic guitar craves. When you replace the strings, are you doing it one at a times, or are you slwoly loosening each string? Here is a step by step method of how you should be replacing them:
1. turn the low E string loose, eight times. Then turn high E, then A, then B, then D, and finally G. Do this until all string are completely loose. It is important that the string are loosened at the same time so that the neck, doesn't bend.
2. Once all strings are loose, get your new strings. Putting the new strings on should start in the middle. This is both for conveniance and neck sustainabality. put the G on first, then the D, then B, then A, then high E, then low E. Make sure each string is not too tight as you put it on. Tighten them up along the way, and when you eventually tune it for the first time, start in the middle. Then you can tune as normal.

You probably already do this, but this is for the newbies that aren't so sure about it yet. Also, now that your neck is kinda ****ed, you should really take your whole guitar into a shop and get it set up. (hopefully they don't say you need a new truss rod, 'cause that can be expensive) You should really be getting it set up every six months if its a guitar you really care about
#7
Quote by Scumbag1792

^And how can I straighten out the guitar properly? (I'm kinda scared I'll hurt and or break the guitar haha)


if you're scared, dont do it. Chances are you WILL break it. Just ask to sit in while they do it at a shop
#8
Quote by mdwallin
Mabye your string replacemant technique is lacking in the gentility an acoustic guitar craves.


Though I hate to be a grammar stickler, I chuckled at this. "Gentility" refers to "being of a noble class." I'd like to think my guitar was born to the gentry. I think the word you're after is "gentleness."

Nevertheless... For the poster, I suspect that the wood of the guitar has been changing (probably because of the weather) and altering the bow of the neck. A number of my acoustics need seasonal tweaks to adjust for the climate changes. I suspect your guitar may need the same. Take it to a guitar shop if you're not comfortable working on it yourself.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Dec 1, 2008,
#9
Quote by mdwallin
Mabye your string replacemant technique is lacking in the gentility an acoustic guitar craves. When you replace the strings, are you doing it one at a times, or are you slwoly loosening each string? Here is a step by step method of how you should be replacing them:
1. turn the low E string loose, eight times. Then turn high E, then A, then B, then D, and finally G. Do this until all string are completely loose. It is important that the string are loosened at the same time so that the neck, doesn't bend.
2. Once all strings are loose, get your new strings. Putting the new strings on should start in the middle. This is both for conveniance and neck sustainabality. put the G on first, then the D, then B, then A, then high E, then low E. Make sure each string is not too tight as you put it on. Tighten them up along the way, and when you eventually tune it for the first time, start in the middle. Then you can tune as normal.


Taking off all the strings at once does not pose any sort of problem for an acoustic guitar(they're tougher and more fragile than you would expect in some aspects). The neck will not warp that fast. You need a few years without any strings before that can even occur. It also does not matter what order you take them off. I always take off all my strings at once because my fretboard needs a good thorough cleaning and it's never posed a problem for me.


I suspect that changing from 11's to 13's might be the problem. Even though it may not have reacted instantly at the time, the amount of string tension from 11's to 13's are roughly 30lbs(I used this as reference). That, matched with the fact that guitars tend to contract in the winter, leading to higher action, is what I suspect to be the problem.

Exactly how long ago did you change from 11's to 13's?
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#10
Quote by GC Shred Off
Though I hate to be a grammar stickler, I chuckled at this. "Gentility" refers to "being of a noble class." I'd like to think my guitar was born to the gentry. I think the word you're after is "gentleness."


HAHA, thanks
I thought it looked a little strange :P