#1
Which do you use, and why?

I use Sheet Music. It may be because I prefer to be able to have the timing without listening to the song, or because I started on Piano, but I prefer Sheet Music.
#2
Tab. I believe its superior because it shows you not only the notes, but HOW and WHERE to play them. Your mind can more quickly interpret information because you are only making one conversions, numbers to frets on guitar. With sheet music you are going notes to numbers to the guitar. This makes a huge difference when playing complicated chords. Also, many of the techniques which are unique to guitar can be expressed more simply in tab form (partial bends, harmonics, tapping, etc).
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#4
In my opinion, standard notation is superior.

TAB's don't show you the note...They show you a number.

Bends, slides, harmonics, and even tapping can be shown on standard notation.

It's easier to remember notes rather than numbers, because you can make associations between notes, such as grouping them into chords or arpeggios or scale fragments.
#5
Notation. It is superior in every way.

Tabs are for lazy guitarists. (bet this will make me hugely popular)
#7
I agree that learning the notes instead of just a string/number is better.
I can read notation, albeit not quite as quickly as I can TAB.

That being said, I'm a guitarist and TAB is for guitarists. You just need to not look at it blindly and actually understand what it's representing.
#8
I really don't care but as this place is full of numeral tabs, I guess it's easier that way.

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#9
For guitar I definately think tabs.

The same notes are on different places. Although on classical sheet music for guitar, I think there are rules or common forms on where to play.

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#10
if you haven't heard the song before, you CAN'T interpret it. you can tell what scale it is, the chord progressions, whatever, but you just CAN'T play it because there is no rhythm explicit in the TAB.

sheet music is superior in various ways. not only it MAKES you learn the notes on the fretboard perfectly (which, really, is the most important thing you should start learning), and it is possible to interpret the song in different ways. in TAB, if a song wasn't written in a certain tuning you'd desire it to be, you would either probably run away and forget about it, or change to that tuning.
in sheet music, you don't (always) have to do that. sure, in modern songs sheet music you'd have to change tuning, especially in metal, but it's always to your choice.

and come on, if you're really attempting to go pro about music, no other musician is ever going to hand you over a sheet with TAB. it's always going to be standard notation. and if you want to gratuate on music, well, there on be any TAB there either.
now, though, if you want to be an internet guitarist, if there is such thing, there's nothing against TAB at all.
#11
But it depends. On guitar the difficulty of the techniques are so immensely varied. I mean if u got Jason Becker's Serrana on regular sheet only, you won't be able to play it right. Cause you will get hung up at a few sweep switches, because of how the guitar works.

A piano for instance has total freedom. Every note is spaced apart, and can only be played in 1 way. The guitar neck is plain weird, and with sheet only u can get hung up at where to play something. Especially with all the unique playing styles and approaches to guitar.

take for instance open string runs. Some little open string runs are easy to play, but if u play it without an open string it comes near impossible. Sheet doesn't tell u this, and by the time u noticed, you will have ****ed up.

I think it's good for classical guitar, cause they work from a single mind set when they arrange something for guitar.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Dec 2, 2008,
#13
If you can read propperly, it doesn't matter if it's a sweep or open strings, or even a completely different instrument.
#14
Quote by Joe Dalton
If you can read propperly, it doesn't matter if it's a sweep or open strings, or even a completely different instrument.


They all have a different sonic quality.

I live by, if u can hear it, it matters. Or ur being inconsistent.

I believe it depends.

Best would be to know both + a good ear.

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#15
good technique + good reading ability + good hear + endless criativity + ability to get lots of girls with your music

whole lotta imagination xD
#16
... You do realise that you really kinda take yourself down don't you?
"if u can hear it, it matters."
Meaning you can hear it... thus... play it perhaps? Taking away the fact of you being a musician and not a monkey so make your own choices how it should sound, it still completely falls apart.
#17
Quote by Joe Dalton
... You do realise that you really kinda take yourself down don't you?
"if u can hear it, it matters."
Meaning you can hear it... thus... play it perhaps? Taking away the fact of you being a musician and not a monkey so make your own choices how it should sound, it still completely falls apart.


I don't understand what u said.

I said for me if u can hear it, it exists.

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#18
IMHO, how guitar pro does should be the standard. Guitar pro's way (mixture of both) should really become the new standard.
#19
And if you can hear, you can play it.

And no, it shouldn't, there are instruments besides the guitar.
#20
Quote by Joe Dalton
And if you can hear, you can play it.

And no, it shouldn't, there are instruments besides the guitar.


Are Tabs used for piano, violia, or instruments? No, they are most used for the guitar or bass. The subject is clearly about the guitar like instruments not others instruments.


I was talking notation for guitar related instruments.
#22
If you ever want to get a degree involving music you have to read sheet music. Tab is nice because its way easier to read, and thats about it. Learning the fretboard by numbers will not help you at all later on though.
#23
TABS - Easier to process and digest.

If some people find musical notation easier then good for them, but when i see a note I have to sit and think about where the note is on my guitar starting with the note my strings tuned in and going upXD I do have most of the notes memorized though, i just have to think for a second.
#24
Quote by Joe Dalton
Notation. It is superior in every way.

Tabs are for lazy guitarists. (bet this will make me hugely popular)


Definately. Tabs is the lazy way to learen music, notation/listening is the more correct way of doing it, as I hope anyone studying music seriously would say.
#25
Quote by handlerb
Tab. I believe its superior because it shows you not only the notes, but HOW and WHERE to play them. Your mind can more quickly interpret information because you are only making one conversions, numbers to frets on guitar. With sheet music you are going notes to numbers to the guitar. This makes a huge difference when playing complicated chords. Also, many of the techniques which are unique to guitar can be expressed more simply in tab form (partial bends, harmonics, tapping, etc).



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#26
I prefer tabs because while sheet music is more professional in a sense, it doesnt always show you best ways to play the notes and with the tab you can visualize the whole neck as you play it because each line is a string and not a bar. Only hindering factor of tab is its rhythm but at the same time if your learning a song you know or love it is pretty easy to figure out than trying to pick up the feeling and melody by just the writing in standard notation.
#27
Quote by xxdarrenxx
But it depends. On guitar the difficulty of the techniques are so immensely varied. I mean if u got Jason Becker's Serrana on regular sheet only, you won't be able to play it right. Cause you will get hung up at a few sweep switches, because of how the guitar works.

A piano for instance has total freedom. Every note is spaced apart, and can only be played in 1 way. The guitar neck is plain weird, and with sheet only u can get hung up at where to play something. Especially with all the unique playing styles and approaches to guitar.

take for instance open string runs. Some little open string runs are easy to play, but if u play it without an open string it comes near impossible. Sheet doesn't tell u this, and by the time u noticed, you will have ****ed up.

I think it's good for classical guitar, cause they work from a single mind set when they arrange something for guitar.

Firstly, there are ways of specifying where exactly to play a note in standard notation. One way is to put the string the note is to be played on in a circle above the note, which instantly leaves only one possible place to play the note. Another is to put a Roman numeral above, which siganls the fret number.

Also, if you have standard notation it is all you need to play a piece. You could sit in a room with just the notation and, if you can read notation properly, come out being able to play the piece regardless of what the piece was.

With just tab, however, you would never be able to say you could play a piece accurately because there is no rythm notated so you would have no idea how to play it.

And for any technique possible on guitar, you can bet someone has found a simple way to notate it in standard notation.
#29
They are both useful types of notation. one is not better or "superior" than the other. there is no reason for any kind of notation snobbery. I find it amazing that people argue over this kind of ridiculous crap.


For learning music, I use my ear, but if I'm writing something out for somebody, or studying a piece of music, I use the one that is most appropriate for the situation.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 2, 2008,
#30
I've said this before, but TAB is great if you do not expect to communicate with another musician ever. Try giving a sax player a line of TAB you just wrote out for him. yeah right.
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#31
Quote by aetherspear
I've said this before, but TAB is great if you do not expect to communicate with another musician ever. Try giving a sax player a line of TAB you just wrote out for him. yeah right.

Well, that would be inappropriate and stupid. why would you want to do that?

Really guys, this kind of notation snobbery is very immature. TAB has its place, so does standard notation. Use common sense to know which is appropriate for the situation.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 2, 2008,
#32
Okay, I heard some pretty good arguments.

I think i'm gonna give std. notation a try, cause I have a strong feeling i'm gonna need it later on. So does anyone have a good method or practices which I can learn from.

I'm total beginner. I know how the theory behind the notation works, but I need some exercizes.

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#33
^ just learn several classical works you enjoy.
if you're starting out and have no idea how to read, go to musictheory.net
if you already have an idea about how it works and just need to get quicker at it, (copy-paste ftw) just learn several classical works you enjoy.
#34
Quote by RCalisto
^ just learn several classical works you enjoy.
if you're starting out and have no idea how to read, go to musictheory.net
if you already have an idea about how it works and just need to get quicker at it, (copy-paste ftw) just learn several classical works you enjoy.


Yes I will check it out.

But are there also like rhythmic exercises (reading rhythms from the sheet). I was thinking of making my own, but the problem is my brain is good. If I hear something I can immediately play it. So once I make exercizes I already know em, kinda annoying, if I wanna learn to read rhythms.

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#36
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well, that would be inappropriate and stupid. why would you want to do that?


That was his point.

Obviously, useful in different situations for different reasons - more useful in general? Sheet music. More instruments.
#37
Quote by The ZenOfShred
IMHO, how guitar pro does should be the standard. Guitar pro's way (mixture of both) should really become the new standard.


it would be useful for guitarists/bassists, but other than that, its pretty useless. I almost entirely forget standard notation, i wish i could still use it. But REAL tabs (ones with rhythm) give you basically everything you need for guitar. Understanding the theory and learning the actual notes can be applied the same way as notation, because you'll recognize patterns just the same way. both useful, but i prefer tabs.


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