#1
1) I have a very cheap alder strat body which is 3 pieces glued together. How will this affect the sound of the guitar when it is done?

2) The alder body has something dark brown...heres a picture ...will tihs affect anything?

3) If the measurements of the last fret to the trem is not accurate, what will happen?

4) Is it ok not to seal up the wood grain, but instead just apply lacquer/ primer and sand to make the coats even? *i hope you know what i mean*

5) I had no choice but to use a belt sander to sand the paint off, and this resulted in fairly large shallow depressions on the body...is it possible to repair these?
Last edited by NoobOnZone at Dec 2, 2008,
#2
1. You'd probably never tell the difference between a 3 piece body or solid if you were in a blind test.
2. I guess that could be a knot in the wood. Or filler from a repair. Should have minimal effect.
3.Your measurement should be from the 12th fret to the place where the string will contact the saddle. Or from the nut to the spot where string touches on saddle. Should be 25.5" from nut, or 12.75" from 12th fret. If this is not correct your guitar will not intonate correctly.
4. If you get the body nice and level, use at least 600 grit for final sanding, and you should be able to spray a few coats of primer, then sand with 1000 grit, recoat, etc. to get a smooth finish. I've never filled grain unless working with a very porous wood(mahogany etc.).
5. You can try to use a long sanding block to level the body up. Lightly spray the body with lacquer first. I'm talking about a really thin coat here. Once dry start sanding across the body with the block. All your low spots will show because they will still be shiny from the lacquer. Once you have sanded until you see no more lacquer you should be level.
#3
1) No it won't matter.

2) Probably a defect in the wood, so it doesn't matter.

3) Do some research on scale length. If the distance from the nut to 12th fret and from 12 fret to saddles are the same, then it will intonate properly. If not, you will have to adjust the saddles.

4) No, you do not need sanding sealer. Just make sure you buy a sandable primer. It will say on the can.

5) Use sandpaper wrapped around a hard block, or hard sanding sponge. Use the above mentioned lacquer method.
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#4
And don't sand to 1000 Grit, between primer and base coat, or any other coats.

You only need 100 grit+ for finish sanding of lacquer, or solid top coats.

Why? Well, if you sand to 1000 grit, the surface will be very smooth, probably shiny.
This is not a good surface for the next coat of paint to stick to, so it wont and you will suffer de-lamination (separating of paint layers).
#6
Quote by Skeet UK
And don't sand to 1000 Grit, between primer and base coat, or any other coats.

You only need 100 grit+ for finish sanding of lacquer, or solid top coats.

Why? Well, if you sand to 1000 grit, the surface will be very smooth, probably shiny.
This is not a good surface for the next coat of paint to stick to, so it wont and you will suffer de-lamination (separating of paint layers).
leaving some "tooth" is a good idea when you're building up thickness. it helps the layers intermingle more than just the solvent from the next coat melting into the previous layer. but 100 grit is a bit coarse. i've been happy with the results from 400 wet between colour coats and 600 wet between clearcoats. and i always shoot the first clear without sanding the final colour coat.
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#7
Anything from 600-1000 grit will be fine. The guy talking about 100 grit is wrong. 100 grit would eat through a thin coat of paint in a heartbeat, especially on the corners. For primer I would use at least 600, for clear coats I use 1000-1500. Look at the guitar I painted, I'll leave a link. Its like looking through glass.


My Guitar Painted:

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1012464
Last edited by Matt420740 at Dec 2, 2008,
#9
Quote by Skeet UK
And don't sand to 1000 Grit, between primer and base coat, or any other coats.

You only need 100 grit+ for finish sanding of lacquer, or solid top coats.



His own words. Not trying to argue or anything. Just letting the thread starter know that 100 grit is NOT for finish sanding of paint.
#10
320-400 is ideal for finish sanding for paint to stick. anything higher you're getting into the grits used for smoothing out the paint ripples. 600 is a good grit for cutting down orange peel fast, 1000-1200 is good for wet sanding to a pre-buff state
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#11
Quote by Øttər
^ It may have been a typo for 1000.



Yes your right. A modicum of common sense would suggest that, nice one!

Yeah, I made a typo. It is rare. Having some sticky keys on my keyboard, SHIFT is a major one!

But yes, also right to confirm that 100 grit is too course.

In any other thread on the same topic by me, I recommend P220 ish for the substrate (bare wood) then 320 for the primer and guide coats.

If it is a metallic colour coat, don't sand it.

If it is a solid colour coat, you can wet sand the second or third coats to 400 ish.

Then with the clear coat, 600 wet between every 3rd coat and 1000 - 2000 etc, for final cutting before buffing.
#12
eheh, so its really the pickup that makes up majority of the sound? So...i can have a decent sounding guitar even with that low quality alder?

i got a little bit discouraged when i sanded down the body and found out about the defects...and also the depressions from the belt sanding...

maybe i can find some time to get back into this project...

oh yeah, and all the stuff like lacquer/ paint, all these exist in spray can form yeah?
#13
No, your amp makes up your tone, your pickups colour it, and your wood doesn't matter that much.

Don't worry about the defects, if you have a good amp, decent picups, and you build this with care, it will soound great.
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Otter, you're my new god.
#14
Quote by NoobOnZone
eheh, so its really the pickup that makes up majority of the sound? So...i can have a decent sounding guitar even with that low quality alder?

i got a little bit discouraged when i sanded down the body and found out about the defects...and also the depressions from the belt sanding...

maybe i can find some time to get back into this project...

oh yeah, and all the stuff like lacquer/ paint, all these exist in spray can form yeah?



spray cans? yes it does.
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