#1
It seems that every time i try to contact a venue, they always either dont return my calss/emails, or say no.

I cant see what im doing wrong...
Im introdcing the band, telling them what were about, giving them i time frame that we'd like to be booked in, giving them links to our music...

Whats wrong?
#3
How old are you?

If you are too young, most places will ignore you regardless of the music because they don't take you seriously.
#7
Venue's often don't control promotion. contact promoters who can put you on.
Epiphone Dot-335
Fender USA Tele
'82 30th anniversary Les Paul goldtop
1965 pre-CBS Fender Jaguar

Crybaby
TS-9
turbo rat
Ge-7
+many more

Fender Twin Reverb
King's Full-tube 100 watt half stack. - £300
#8
Just had a listen to your songs. Seriously consider recording a song or 2 in a studio. They're far too hard to hear, making it seem as though thats how you would be live. I wouldn't book you based on your myspace page. I can't tell if you guys sound like ****, or if you sound great.

And by the way, I skipped through every song once I hit about 10 seconds in because the background noise was unbearable.
#10
OK. From your live recordings, you guys sound good live. However, if you want shows I would invest in studio recording, even if its only one song. Also, I would change your 'About' section slightly.

'So we are currently 5 guys who waste time in the Delamont basement making music. Don't ask us to describe ourselves, cause we can't. As a band, our efficiency is slow, but occasionally we will get a lot done. If you want and/or need us to play somewhere (lulz!) just drop us a line at kdelamont@gmail.com, and we'll get back to you.'

Try something more like

'Hi, we're five guys from Delmont. We hope you enjoy our stuff. If you want and/or need us to play somewhere just drop us a line at kdelamont@gmail.com, and we'll get back to you.'

You can then go on to describe your band members/attitude towards your music after that.
However, don't mention anything about your speed of progress or anything like that. It can look bad in some peoples eyes. I know your trying to be honest, but It just doesn't look good.

Other that that, your myspace is fine.

I agree with Johnny Loves you on talking to event organisers in person and selling yourself, get some advice or read a book, its a good idea. Also, try and read a book about the industry. Some of the ones I have come across generally have some advice on this matter, but the books will give you a lot of info you are going to need as artists.
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
what would that be called? a Fibson with Gender confusion issues?
#11
Quote by Hdap101
Venue's often don't control promotion. contact promoters who can put you on.



Bingo.
Ibanez SZ320
Peavey 6505+
Marshall 1960B
Dunlop Wah
Dano EQ
#12
Basically wh0re yourselves out, with the exception of pay to play gigs. Talk to anyone and everyone who'll listen to you about your band and ask them to check you out, then when (and if) you see them again, ask them if they've checked you guys out until they have. Get someone who knows how to work a myspace page to do yours up real nice. If you have a gig coming up, post flyers on telephone poles at all major intersections near you and in music stores if they let you.

Also, I second the motion about the promoters. They know what they're doing and can vastly help you out.
Question not yourself. Challenge those who would deny you your true self for an independent thinker is the greatest enemy to those who seek to control you
#13
There are so many bands out there right now that you just need to sell yourself by having everything from quality photos to quality recorded music. If you don't take yourself serious then why should the venue. Most of all if you can't get booked then you need to network all over your area and try to meet the club owners or venue owners face to face. Also a lot of clubs if they are not all ages don't like to book talent under 18. There could be many reasons but I have booked larger bands before and it just all depends on your pitch, while some of it also depends on the venue and how relevant the band is to them.
#14
Def go through some promoters, they get paid to book bands like you...def get good recordings, my band just got a $250 digital recorder to at least have good quality demos in which you can hear everything nicely...either do that or get in a studio, anything to show youre serious about how ur music should sound...Some places need bands to fill weekends or a week night, while other places will only book you if you have a large following (my band has a ton of friends in college so we bring the bars lots of money)...lastly under 18 is a prob because it means you have no friends who can legally drink if theyre strict
'I love her, but I love to fish...I'm gonna miss her"
#15
Yes, get in contact with promoters, and make friends with them if you can, they will call you for gigs if your good enough. But for gods sake don't go to booking agents. T

hese people will go to promoters for you and get you gigs. However they WILL ask for a percentage of your earnings as well as asking for a percentage of the total gig profit. You don't need their services at the moment, and they tend to be very arrogant, thinking they deserve a better percentage than they do, and will try and get as much as they can from you. I think 10%-15% is considered a 'fair' deal, but they will typically try and get 20-25% of your earnings, which is a no no.

Also, get in with a couple of the local bands, try and become friendly with them, they will also be able to help you get gigs, and will be able to advise you who is good to work with and who will **** you around.
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
what would that be called? a Fibson with Gender confusion issues?
#16
Get better recordings
Get more friends on your myspace page (10 friends=who's gonna come to this gig? They want to get people to come to you need some sort of a fan base) and get more plays of your songs so people know that you guys actually are listened too.
Get in tight with a few other bands so that way you guys are like a packaged deal and they expect to see you play with them.
Find all ages or under 18 venues since you probably wont get shows at bars and the sorts
Gibson Les Paul Studio Deluxe/Ibanez RGA42/LTD EC401vf
Into:
Whammy IV>Pitchblack>Dunlop 536Q>Fulltone Fulldrive 2>Hardwire TL-2>MXR 10 Band>Line 6 M13
Into:
80s Carvin x100b w/ cab
#17
if I looekd at your myspace I would see your friend total and that would scare me away. Think about it, a venue is there to make money, if you only have a couple of friends on the myspace the venue will think you won't be bringing anyone and will just scrap the idea of having you play.
My Gear
Guitars:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio
-Ibanez "lawsuit" Les Paul
-Ibanez S470
-PRS SE Custom

Amp:
Marshall TSL100
Marshall 1960a cab

Effects:
Dunlop 535q wah
Visual Sound Liquid Chorus

Pickups:
Guitarforce
MHD
#18
Lots of good suggestions. I don't think having a live recording is a bad thing.... it lets them know what you *really* sound like, as opposed to what you can be made to sound like. However... I think a better live recording would present you better.

Agreed, too, on the lack of myspace friends. If you just signed up a couple of days ago, that would be one thing, but after six months, you've really not promoted your site. That would make venues wary of how well you would promote your show.

It's hard to get gigs when you don't have any experience to speak of. With no track record, you don't have anything to sell yourself on. Once you have some achievements under your belt, things will get easier.

Seeing as you want to appear as legit as possible, maybe consider getting a 'proper' website. That takes the pressure off having to have a certain number of friends, profile views, total plays, etc. It also makes things look like you are taking it much more seriously. You have a bit of an investment of yourself in yourself. Any joker can get a myspace with 10 friends inside of a few days.

Jumping on with other bands that you know is always a good approach.

Also, how you communicate with these venues is key. Roughly here are the steps:
-first contact - get a name of the person who books bands, and if you don't know already, what kinds of bands they book. If you're a metal band trying to get a gig at a bar that generally books top-40 cover bands, it's no wonder they're not calling you back.

-second contact - contact that specific person who books the bands. It may be an in-house guy or a promoter. Whichever. At least you know who makes the decisions now. Address him/her by name, and direct your inquiry to him/her specifically.

In both cases, make sure you come off as professionally as possible. Spell things properly, use complete sentences, and proper English. Think of it as a business letter.... because that's what it is.

-After contacting the person who does the booking, find out what they want from you in order to be considered for a show. Give them exactly what they want. Don't ask for a commitment from them right then and there. Ask them when you can contact them back to follow up on today's conversation.

-Follow up. Call him/her back when you said you would. At this time, start trying to get a commitment from them. If they can't commit, ask when you can follow up. Lather, rinse, repeat.

In any case, remember that it isn't how good a band you are. It helps, but what is more important is that the venue has confidence that you're going to bring in enough people to make the bar make some money. It also helps if the bar has some reassurance that you're not going to scare away any of the few regulars who might be there.

Focus on what YOU have to offer THEM in terms of dollars and cents - not what THEY are going to offer YOU. That part comes next... after you get the commitment that they'll be interested in booking you.

As an original band, don't expect much in terms of payment.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#19
Hey,

You can get my free monthly newsletter re. How to Get Gigs here:

http://www.gig-getter.co.uk


Hope it helps you

Rgds,

Gareth
Author of Gig-Getter: How to Get More Gigs than you can play

"Top gig-getting tips...you'll be playing more shows in no time" - Total Guitar
"Excellent" - Bass Guitar Magazine
#20
Quote by |Heretic|
OK. From your live recordings, you guys sound good live. However, if you want shows I would invest in studio recording, even if its only one song. Also, I would change your 'About' section slightly.

'So we are currently 5 guys who waste time in the Delamont basement making music. Don't ask us to describe ourselves, cause we can't. As a band, our efficiency is slow, but occasionally we will get a lot done. If you want and/or need us to play somewhere (lulz!) just drop us a line at kdelamont@gmail.com, and we'll get back to you.'

Try something more like

'Hi, we're five guys from Delmont. We hope you enjoy our stuff. If you want and/or need us to play somewhere just drop us a line at kdelamont@gmail.com, and we'll get back to you.'

You can then go on to describe your band members/attitude towards your music after that.
However, don't mention anything about your speed of progress or anything like that. It can look bad in some peoples eyes. I know your trying to be honest, but It just doesn't look good.

^This....

Quote by axemanchris
Lots of good suggestions. I don't think having a live recording is a bad thing.... it lets them know what you *really* sound like, as opposed to what you can be made to sound like. However... I think a better live recording would present you better.

Agreed, too, on the lack of myspace friends. If you just signed up a couple of days ago, that would be one thing, but after six months, you've really not promoted your site. That would make venues wary of how well you would promote your show.

It's hard to get gigs when you don't have any experience to speak of. With no track record, you don't have anything to sell yourself on. Once you have some achievements under your belt, things will get easier.

Seeing as you want to appear as legit as possible, maybe consider getting a 'proper' website. That takes the pressure off having to have a certain number of friends, profile views, total plays, etc. It also makes things look like you are taking it much more seriously. You have a bit of an investment of yourself in yourself. Any joker can get a myspace with 10 friends inside of a few days.

Jumping on with other bands that you know is always a good approach.

Also, how you communicate with these venues is key. Roughly here are the steps:
-first contact - get a name of the person who books bands, and if you don't know already, what kinds of bands they book. If you're a metal band trying to get a gig at a bar that generally books top-40 cover bands, it's no wonder they're not calling you back.

-second contact - contact that specific person who books the bands. It may be an in-house guy or a promoter. Whichever. At least you know who makes the decisions now. Address him/her by name, and direct your inquiry to him/her specifically.

In both cases, make sure you come off as professionally as possible. Spell things properly, use complete sentences, and proper English. Think of it as a business letter.... because that's what it is.

-After contacting the person who does the booking, find out what they want from you in order to be considered for a show. Give them exactly what they want. Don't ask for a commitment from them right then and there. Ask them when you can contact them back to follow up on today's conversation.

-Follow up. Call him/her back when you said you would. At this time, start trying to get a commitment from them. If they can't commit, ask when you can follow up. Lather, rinse, repeat.

In any case, remember that it isn't how good a band you are. It helps, but what is more important is that the venue has confidence that you're going to bring in enough people to make the bar make some money. It also helps if the bar has some reassurance that you're not going to scare away any of the few regulars who might be there.

Focus on what YOU have to offer THEM in terms of dollars and cents - not what THEY are going to offer YOU. That part comes next... after you get the commitment that they'll be interested in booking you.

As an original band, don't expect much in terms of payment.

CT

...and this ^ are both exellent posts and I can't really add anything apart from to tell you to persevere. I've been in loads of different acts and I generaly end up being the guy who gets the gigs. Each new band I've joined has struggled to get gigs at first, I've regularly spent literaly 5 days constantly on the phone ringing venue after venue trying to hussle some gigs and only come up with 2 bookings, but it's when you've played a couple of shows that successfuly held an audience, entertained them and left 'em wanting more that word gets around other local venues and bookings start coming in, you'll still have to be ringing around contacting venues, but people who previously wouldn't book you will probably now be more likely to book you because you're now a proven act and they are not taking as much of a risk in booking you.
Once you have a good local reputation, start contacting out of town venues. The venues in surrounding areas to your local town will now start to hear about you and will be wanting a piece of the action.
Before you know it, you'll have a list of venues that will all happily re-book you, don't play any of them more than twice a year (play one venue too often and people get bored of you) and remember that even if you only have 26 venues on your list, that still equates to a gig every week for a whole year.

Good posters are important too, you want something eye-catching (generaly full colour) and at least A3 sized (preferably A2 or A1)
This makes you look more professional, which attracts a bigger audience even if no one's heard of you. Promoters and venue owners know this, so if you send an example of a really good poster for your band along with a demo to venues, it helps a lot.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jan 14, 2009,
#21
Lots of good responses here, and they can justify why you don't get the gigs. If places aren't even returning your calls and emails though (not even to tell you know) that's probably because you come off as completely unprofessional. Even a terrible band will get the courtesy of a call-back/write-back saying "no," unless the solicitation that band send out was just absolutely terrible.

Why don't you share with us one of the emails you sent to a venue, and we can see if there's something terrible wrong with it (other than the fact that you just sent an email and didn't keep hastling the venue on the phone or in person as you should )