#1
So heres the deal...I'm in a music class and I need some opinons for the discussion tonight...

is the long-standing structure of the music business doomed...?

please help?
#3
As Joshrocker48 said, it'll adapt, music will be sold as mp3s/similar in a near future.
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#5
You can download albums from online sellers now (iTunes Store et al). It's already adapting.

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#7
I saw these things in Best Buy the other day, they're like CDs on cards. You buy the card, type in the code or something on our computer, and BAM! CD is on your hardrive. I thought it was doomed....

I think that live music with still be fine, but it might be tough for recording companies to get much business.
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#8
Quote by SoWrongItsMatt

I think that live music with still be fine, but it might be tough for recording companies to get much business.

Interesting corollary to this and mine: You think online music stores might become the next record companies? Not literally, obviously, but in essence?

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#11
Quote by SteveHouse
Interesting corollary to this and mine: You think online music stores might become the next record companies? Not literally, obviously, but in essence?


I think iTunes and the like almost ARE record companies. They effectively distribute records, and get a share of the profit. They seem to do everything but fund the artist's recording, which not all record companies even do. Getting signed by a record company has always been the dream of many average artists. If you asked me whether I'd want to be signed to a minor label or put onto iTunes, I'd pick iTunes.

So what I'm saying is, online music stores are already more influencial than MOST record companies.
RAZZLEFRAZZLE
#12
Quote by SoWrongItsMatt
I think iTunes and the like almost ARE record companies. They effectively distribute records, and get a share of the profit. They seem to do everything but fund the artist's recording, which not all record companies even do. Getting signed by a record company has always been the dream of many average artists. If you asked me whether I'd want to be signed to a minor label or put onto iTunes, I'd pick iTunes.

So what I'm saying is, online music stores are already more influencial than MOST record companies.

There ya go, TS. You've got your discussion points right there.

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#13
The thing is, back in the older generation of bands, then band would release a record/album, then tour to promote the record, with the main source of money coming from people buying the record. Nowadays there has been a shift and bands release albums to promote themselves, then get a lot of their money from touring and playing live. So it has sort of switched to the other way. That's what we got told in music tech class a couple of years ago anyway, i don't have any statistics to prove it.
#14
Quote by SoWrongItsMatt
I think iTunes and the like almost ARE record companies. They effectively distribute records, and get a share of the profit. They seem to do everything but fund the artist's recording, which not all record companies even do. Getting signed by a record company has always been the dream of many average artists. If you asked me whether I'd want to be signed to a minor label or put onto iTunes, I'd pick iTunes.

So what I'm saying is, online music stores are already more influencial than MOST record companies.



perfect thanks man
#16
Holy hell, Joshrocker i havent seen you in a long time

and Yeah, as he said its not doomed. It changed when vinyl transitioned into CD's, and it will be able to deal with pretty much any changes that will occur in the coming years i think.
#18
Record companies are screwed. Its too easy for artists to release their stuff independently, and just look, more and more artists are opting for indy labels rather than the big 5 record companies (if they are signing at all). So big record deals and huge bands are soon to be a thing of the past, but the industry will adapt and it'll be just as strong as ever. Humans cant live without music.
#20
well maybe if they didn't make cds $36437256782.34 I'd buy them,but I just can't afford em
#21
There's also the whole aspect of youtube and myspace, and the fame that comes with some of the bands that rocket into stardom off there.

The only thing that's really doomed here is that whole copyright ordeal. Who owns what and who can have it and how they get it.

You should definitely mention Radioheads "In Rainbows" and how it supposedly "shook up" the music industry and how it's definitely going to change thing, and how it already has.

(As evidence you know)
#22
Well, record companies are screwed, but music will ALWAYS be here. As for the business, it's looking grim. Britney Spears is supposedly making a comeback! That should be all the info you need. And the fact that The Answer isnt signed by a major label yet.

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#23
It may not be doomed but it will most certainly have to adapt. Regardless it's going to change, whether the people in the industry like it or not.
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#24
During the 1960s in Britain the BBC controlled everything we saw and heard on TV and Radio. With the exception of several pirate radio stations operating wherever they could. The BBC tried to stop them but failed, so they did the next best thing and took control of them by employing the Pirate DJs to work on new BBC radio shows and stations.

If the record industry doesn't do something similar to combat the increase in the availability of pirated music it will be doomed
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#25
Quote by Joshrocker48
No. The music industry will adapt. Online may be the future but CDs still sell

The music industry itself will adapt. It is my belief however that the industry moguls (Time-Warner and Atlantic (?)) have already failed, and will never catch up again, much like MTV.
#26
Quote by skater dan0
During the 1960s in Britain the BBC controlled everything we saw and heard on TV and Radio. With the exception of several pirate radio stations operating wherever they could. The BBC tried to stop them but failed, so they did the next best thing and took control of them by employing the Pirate DJs to work on new BBC radio shows and stations.

If the record industry doesn't do something similar to combat the increase in the availability of pirated music it will be doomed

It already tries this. People tend to call it "selling out" because such a sound change is usually involved.

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#27
No, because music will always exist as long as I am alive, and I know lots of other people that will continue to make it happen.
#29


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