#1
Okay so my holy grail of guitar playing, biggest goal is to be able to improv over a nice slow blues progression in the style of mayer or clapton by the end of my 2nd year of playing.

I've finally figured some things out and I want to make sure I'm on the right track.

For the longest time I only knew how to play the first position of the minor pent scale (or blues). Recently, I learned all the positions. I'm still a little rusty on it but I'm getting there.

So lets say for example a progression in the key of C (like if i was playing over a blues backing track).

It'd go:
I (C7) x 4 bars
IV (F7) x 2
I (C7) x 2
V (G7) x 1
IV (F7) x 1
I (C7) x 2

No where I messed up before (I believe) is that when it'd change from C to F, I'd start playing in the minor pentatonic scale for F (1st position), and this sounded wrong.

What I think I figured out is that when it gets to F, I really should be playing some notes centered around F but in the same scale of the minor pentatonic for C. Such that the positions of the scale stay the same throughout the entire song, I just move to the right scale degrees to accentuate the song with my soloing? is this right?

so maybe like during C I'd play


-----
-----
-----
-8/10~-
-----
-----


and then when it gets to F I'd do something like


E|-15---13---11--------------8-------------------|
B|----------------13---11------------------------|
G|---------------------------10------------------|
D|-----------------------------------------------|
A|-----------------------------------------------|
E|-----------------------------------------------|




am I on the right track?
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

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#2
Changing the scale for the right chord isn't wrong (so F pentatonic for F7 and C pentatonic for C7). This approach is called 'playing the changes'. It's a little more difficult and so not many guitarists do it. imo it sounds better if it's done right.

You said something sounded wrong? Maybe it's because you're using the m3rd of the pentatonic scale as a consonance (as a safe note)? Keep in mind the second note of the pentatonic minor scale (a m3rd if you know your theory) is actually a dissonant note over dominant seventh chords.

Well here's a repost of mine you might like:
First off, improve your phrasing.

Try to phrase yourself like a singer. Think of it as if you're singing with your guitar. Listen to some singing melodies and try to copy it on your guitar.

Next learn 2 or 3 shapes from a pentatonic scale. Try to become good at moving between each shape and try to be able to play 4 or 5 notes on the same string. This will help your phrasing majorly.

When you get good, play over some backing tracks. You should be able to hear the chord progression and hear which notes are stressed (first beat of every bar). On these stressed notes, try to play chord tones of the chord playing.

Also, learn your theory.

You shouldnt be afraid to use other guys licks (like when uncreativity hits), but you shouldn't ever overuse licks. It's unoriginal, cheap and improvisation sounds so much better.
#3
^ +1, well i've nothing much to add other than be patient. Playing like Mayer or Clapton over a blues chord progression should be possible after 2 years of play, but improvising like it might take more time. Don't forget guys like Clapton have been playing for a heck of a long time (maybe the guts of 30 years?) and have picked up a lot from other players in that time.

Other advice is improv over anything whenever possible, I improv over themes from tv shows, adverts, songs that come onto the radio. After I do some proper practice I probably spend a good while most nights just noodling along to tv shows music, trying to improve phrasing and thinking on the spot.
#4
Also work on tone control and dynamics. This is even more important then which notes u play.

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#5
Quote by mlfarrell
Okay so my holy grail of guitar playing, biggest goal is to be able to improv over a nice slow blues progression in the style of mayer or clapton by the end of my 2nd year of playing.

I've finally figured some things out and I want to make sure I'm on the right track.

For the longest time I only knew how to play the first position of the minor pent scale (or blues). Recently, I learned all the positions. I'm still a little rusty on it but I'm getting there.

So lets say for example a progression in the key of C (like if i was playing over a blues backing track).

It'd go:
I (C7) x 4 bars
IV (F7) x 2
I (C7) x 2
V (G7) x 1
IV (F7) x 1
I (C7) x 2

No where I messed up before (I believe) is that when it'd change from C to F, I'd start playing in the minor pentatonic scale for F (1st position), and this sounded wrong.

What I think I figured out is that when it gets to F, I really should be playing some notes centered around F but in the same scale of the minor pentatonic for C. Such that the positions of the scale stay the same throughout the entire song, I just move to the right scale degrees to accentuate the song with my soloing? is this right?

so maybe like during C I'd play


-----
-----
-----
-8/10~-
-----
-----


and then when it gets to F I'd do something like


E|-15---13---11--------------8-------------------|
B|----------------13---11------------------------|
G|---------------------------10------------------|
D|-----------------------------------------------|
A|-----------------------------------------------|
E|-----------------------------------------------|




am I on the right track?

Yes you are - "playing the changes" like demon suggests isn't all that common, it tends to crop up more in jazz or complex prog stuff. For blues you're far better off sticking to the scale of your key if you want things to sound "right".

Remember, those chords your following will all have the notes of the scale either in or around them, just try to keep track of your roots, 4th and 5ths as you move around the fretboard so you know what to resolve to.
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#6
Keep improvising thats a great way to practice. But in addition to improvisation try learning some varietys of solos in varied styles from different artists you like. This will help you to learn licks and get your fingers trying things that you might not whislt improvising in your scales. By this i mean new ways of using your scale. This will help you double if you analize the solo that you learn and think about what the orignal artist might have been thinking like what key/scale.

I also recomend you dont play the changes right off (maybe later on.) on 12 bar blues. Its easier to stay in one scale but try learning the notes all over the fretboard to escape the box style playing.