#1
Hey,

I am looking for some advice on fixing a problem of some deadfrets. On my fender acoustic, the frets between like 8-14 are dead on the 1rst, and 2nd strings, but you can hear the buzzing and effects on the other strings aswell. The action looks okay, but I assuming I need to adjust the trust rod. I need to know what way to turn it,and what way would I be looking at it when turn it, to ensure I turn it the right way. I am currently stationed in Korea in the USAF, so I don't exactly have a guitar shop right near me. Any help would be appreciated.
- Find your path, find your road, expand your horizons beyond your home.
#3
Less bow in neck, 1/4 turn (at a time) tighter (clockwise) More bow, Loosen 1/4 turn at a time. You will want to have just a little bow.
#4
Well, to be honest with you restless_thrash won't justify it, since it looks fine, just doesn't sound so. Also, I don't have a mic so I can't upload some sound, but if you've played guitar for a while I am sure you've ran ino this. It sounds similar holding the string down on the fret bar itself sort of. So adjusting the trust rod should straighten this out?
- Find your path, find your road, expand your horizons beyond your home.
#5
Also, what is the typical size of the nut?
- Find your path, find your road, expand your horizons beyond your home.
#6
Did they all of a sudden go dead? Did you do anything like change the strings beforehand? Do you live in a cold winter climate? Is your guitar getting enough humidity? Are the frets actually dead? Or just buzzing really badly?

Before you turn the truss rod, make sure everything else is normal.

Like Tempoe said, you only want a very slight bow.

As for nuts, there are standardized widths such as 1 3/4, or 1 11/16, but im not sure how that's relevant to dead frets.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#7
They went dead with the strings on there, I am going to assume it is from temperature change. Sometime the heat in this building works, sometimes it doesn't. I changed the strings and they still sound the same, as far as the nut goes, I meant where you use the allen key to adjust the rod, sorry lol..
- Find your path, find your road, expand your horizons beyond your home.
#8
What guitar do you have? Are you keeping your guitar humidified? Heaters during the winter can severely damage guitars.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#9
I'm guessing you're either stationed at Osan or Kunsan. Either way the weather there now isn't so bad. Mid 40's to low 50's with humidity levels about 65%. (MSN searched the data).
What I'd be concerned about here is the amount of change the guitar went through where you were last stationed vs. where you currently are. Say you were last at Lackland, where it's a lot dryer than Korea, the move could have caused the changes, warranting a setup, even if it's a limited one. Current temp swings aren't going to help either.
So, if you've got a hard case to keep the guitar in do so. See if you can store it somewhere with a bit more constant temperature(under lock and key of course).
Check your neck. Sight down the length of it from the headstock and look for twisting or bowing. It should look pretty straight and true.
Check the fretboard relief. Fret the first string at the first fret and at the same time at the 14th fret and have a look under the string at the 7th fret area. There should be a sliver of clearance there, about a credit cards thickness worth. Do the same test to the 6th string. Should have a tad more clearance than the 1st.
Check the area of the soundboard just behind the bridge, between the bridge and base of the guitar. It should not be raised or buldged up. Also look at the back of the guitar. It should have a nice gradual curve to it. Not sunken or depressed, nor should it have a larger than normal hump to it.
Feel along the sides of your fretboard for sharp frets. This would indicate a dried out neck, needing some prompt moisture.
All of this should only take you a few minutes to do. Probably take longer to read all this than do it, lol.
Get back to us with the results and we'll take it from there.
BTW, I'm prior USAF too. Nice to mee you.
Last edited by LeftyDave at Dec 3, 2008,