#1
I'm looking for some feedback as far as studying "The Caged System" verses traditional music theory.Any advice?Thanks.
All the worlds indeed a stage and we are merely players
#2
I would say its better learning the 'traditional' way inside out and then if you want apply the caged system. i find the caged system to be limited on its own. However some people swear by it so I am sure other people will have different views.
Andy
#3
If I'm remembering right, is the caged system the one where the open chord form correspond to the major scale patterns? If so it is pretty useful for navigating the fretboard. When I'm improvising, I have always called my major scale patterns with how they stack in a modal situation.

ex pattern 2 (d pattern i think in caged) i would call the dorian pattern
pattern 5 (g in caged) i would call aeolian pattern

It's pretty much a whatever works for you topic. I know guys that think of it how I do, some that use the caged, and some that just look at it from traditional theory.
#4
CAGED and traditional theory don't really go against each other, so you could learn both.
#5
Definately michal. What I was saying is that its beneficial to learn the fretboard the traditional way and then if you want apply caged on top of what you already know. It will allow you to be thinking in 2 different ways and will be much easier for you to navigate the fretboard...in my humble opinion of course. Personally I never use the CAGED method since I am comfortable using scale shapes although I hate referring to them as shapes.
Andy
#7
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
Definately michal. What I was saying is that its beneficial to learn the fretboard the traditional way and then if you want apply caged on top of what you already know. It will allow you to be thinking in 2 different ways and will be much easier for you to navigate the fretboard...in my humble opinion of course. Personally I never use the CAGED method since I am comfortable using scale shapes although I hate referring to them as shapes.
Andy


I agree, I wasn't trying to disagree with you. I personally dislike the CAGED system and don't use it at all
#8
edg I was reffering to the traditional method of learning the fretboard not theory. Traditional method being learning scale positions/'boxes' and learning the fretboard that way as opposed to CAGED.Maybe its not exactly traditional but in my eyes its the standard method when not using caged.
Andy
#11
Quote by Andy_Mclaughlan
edg I was reffering to the traditional method of learning the fretboard not theory. Traditional method being learning scale positions/'boxes' and learning the fretboard that way as opposed to CAGED.Maybe its not exactly traditional but in my eyes its the standard method when not using caged.
Andy

If the "traditional method" is learning scale positions/boxes to learn the fretboard - that is exactly what the CAGED system does.

I have seen 2 different methods of breaking the fretboard into smaller box/pattern shapes.
1 is the CAGED system which breaks the fretboard into five patterns based on overlapping root shapes, chord shapes, and extending them to full scale patterns.
2 is the 3nps system, three notes per string. It breaks the fretboard down into seven overlapping box/pattern shapes. These are basically made up of 3 notes per string and each one starts on the next note in the scale. If you do learn this way be careful not to name each position as a seperate "mode". It's not helpful. Anyone that teaches patterns different patterns as different modes is setting you up for confusion. You should learn them all as different shapes of the same major scale.

There are some variations on these two systems. But they are all pretty much the same idea - breaking the fretboard into smaller chunks to assist learning.

You might also benefit from learning the scale pattern along each string and moving from pattern to pattern.

Some will advise you just to learn all the notes on the fretboard, or to learn the scale step pattern W W H W W W H and the scale degrees. Then learn how to move in W or H steps from string to string as well as along strings. That way if you know what degree you're on you know where you can move to and never be lost.

There's a lot to learn. Just pick a method and get into it. Personally I am a fan of the CAGED system because it relates root shapes to chord shapes and extends these into full scale shapes. To me it seems a logical approach. Each chord has five basic triad shapes along the fretboard and building a scale off each of those appeals to my way of learning.

It may be different for you.
Si