#1
is it true that a guitar with cutaway will have less projection compared to a fullbodied acoustic.
also tell me if a guitar with all solid woods will have more volume than a laminated woods guitar.
#2
Having a cutaway on an acoustic guitar will change the sound, but not much. I prefer cutaways. Even if you dont use those frets you might wanna use them for octave playing.
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#3
yes it will have less projection.. that's only because the amount of mass you're going to resound, producing the sound.

so, less mass = less ressonance = less projection

---

laminated wood is made of several sheets of laminated wood! LOL

so, they're glued together, forming something like a sandwich of wood. those connections aren't perfect, so part of the initial energy will be lost.

solid pieces of wood are more efficient in transfering the energy of the strings to the whole body, however laminated sides are acceptable

so, solid wood = more efficiency = more ressonance = more projection
#4
Cutaways will take a tiny bit away from the tone, but not enough for you to even notice. This is because the bracing at the top of the guitar is very stiff and doesn't vibrate as much as the rest of the guitar anyway. It really depends on how well made the guitars are as well.

As for solid vs. laminate. There's no point in comparing all solid vs. all laminate. Laminate just loses like no tomorrow. Solid top vs all solid though... the solid top can keep up with all solid depending on how well built it is up to a certain point. Generally, under the $1000USD range, makers like Seagull who pay a lot of attention to quality can keep up if not beat most all solid body guitars. Solid wood isn't necessarily any louder than laminate.It really depends on how good the maker is. Of course, im comparing solid top vs. all solid.

EDIT: To above poster. It's not always true that a cutaway will have less volume/projection. When I was buying my Martin, there was also a cutaway version in the store. It was significantly louder and had more projection. These things really depends on the wood itself sometimes as well.
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#5
Quote by toriicelli
yes it will have less projection.. that's only because the amount of mass you're going to resound, producing the sound.

so, less mass = less ressonance = less projection

---

laminated wood is made of several sheets of laminated wood! LOL

so, they're glued together, forming something like a sandwich of wood. those connections aren't perfect, so part of the initial energy will be lost.

solid pieces of wood are more efficient in transfering the energy of the strings to the whole body, however laminated sides are acceptable

so, solid wood = more efficiency = more ressonance = more projection


Unfortunately your vibrational theory is pretty poor. You may lose some projection, but only very marginally. Personally, I'm more concerned with the quality of the sound rather than outright volume. It comes down to build quality and choice of wood. A well built guitar with a cutaway will always sound better (and most likely be louder) than a dumpy full body acoustic.