#1
what is the difference between a head and cab combo and a combo amp? other than one being a head. like wat is the tonal differences.
#2
The head/cab combo makes it easier to swap out for different cabs (thus different) speakers. Though you can do this with a combo, the dimensions will still be the same, so if you don't like the flabbiness of the bass in the combo, it's probably because of the design of the speaker "cabinet" in the combo.
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I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
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#3
Because you have the option of using different cabs with a head, you give yourself a lot more versatility when it comes to speaker choice, number of speakers, and cab construction. With a combo, you limit yourself to one cab design, one speaker arrangement, and you have to physically change the speakers to get different speakers.

It should be noted that you can usually use a combo as a head by plugging it's speaker output into a different cab, but that kind of defeats the point of buying a combo in the first place.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#4
Well a head and a cab has more speakers and a more roomy sound, and heads often have higher wattage than combos. But if you're a gigging musician, you learn that such minor differences play little role on the live stage (you'll see crappy soundguys, bad rooms, bad PA's etc from show to show), so the portability of a combo would really be much more appreciated and necessary once the "rock n roll" factor of getting a stack wears off. I got my halfstack just because of a massive discount making it cheaper than the combo, but I'm thinking of selling it and getting the combo anyway.

And just to be clear, there's NO WAY IN HELL that there's gonna be volume issues if you get a combo. 50w tube is enough for any place, trust me.
#5
The portability issue is something that goes both ways. A combo is pretty much "all inclusive" and is a single piece you have to move around. But with a head and a 2x12, you can break it down into two much lighter pieces which is easier for some to move around.
ESP LTD EC-256 and a Fender Deluxe VM
#6
Quote by Kendall
The portability issue is something that goes both ways. A combo is pretty much "all inclusive" and is a single piece you have to move around. But with a head and a 2x12, you can break it down into two much lighter pieces which is easier for some to move around.


It's less heavy, but takes more space... a combo is always smaller, and that's what I was getting at. You lug a 4x12 in your trunk and it's full, and you don't want to place the head on top of the grillclotch cause you'd damage it.

And I find cabinets to be harder to handle by being so broad, it's harder to get a good grip on them for extended lifting.
#7
something else to consider is a 2x12 cab. it's smaller than a 4x12 (duh) and is just as switchable as its larger counterpart. avatar makes great 2x12s if you want to check em out.
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#8
Quote by Aziraphale
a combo is always smaller

Very false.

My Road King and 5150 combo were as big as my 4x12, were much more awkwardt o carry and weighed more. Most 2x12 combos are huge.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#9
Both have their good and bad points but the sound from the output is the same. I prefer the combo because it is easier to gig.
#11
so what would you guys suggest for someone who does some small gigs and home practice. a head and 2 by 12. or a combo?
#12
they are pretty much the same thing...it's the wattage you want to watch. And i do suggest you read the read i gave a link to
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