#1
I'm curious, do any of you have experience/know about if you record with a not-so-great quality microphone, but your playing is solid...do you think that if you sent in a tape to a record company with a "eh" quality recording would it make them ignore it?
#2
Update: Check my music for a test to see the quality, and tell me what you think of the quality.
#3
I'm almost certain a record company would ignore it, there are two reasons:
1. Most record companies don't take demo tapes from unsolicited sources anyway.
2. They look for people who are willing to put as much work into their product, which means they look for people who pay out for good recording usually.

If the playing is exceptionally awesome/catchy, something that will sell CDs for the record label, because that's really all it comes down to, they might take a look at it. Or if they've already heard that you're an awesome act live or something. But again most labels don't just take demos sent in the mail, they have to be given by a trusted manager or music laywer, stuff like that. I hope that helped.

Btw, the quality wasn't really that bad.
#4
If you are sending in a demo as a songwriter, just a piano and vocal on a ghetto blaster is sufficient. The more their imaginations can run wild with the production, the better.

If you are sending it in as a band hoping to get signed, you need to present your band to them the way they will ultimately present you to the marketplace. That means that everything has to be in place... the look, the production, the live attendance track record, evidence of solid sales as an independent artist, etc.

EDIT: Just listened. Nice playing, and okay sound quality, but with a demo like that, what are you realistically hoping to achieve? I don't think there is a record company in existence anywhere that cares one lick about one guy who can shred by himself in his room. That's just a hard sell. And it is certainly not a songwriter demo.

IMHO, this would be a good demo for a person/band who is advertising that they are looking for a guitar player. When we were looking for a guitarist, it was our expectation that the person would have a demo of some sort. Any half-way serious player should. This demo does succeed in showing someone that you can play. If I was looking for a guitar player, though, I would still want a demo that also highlighted the person's ability to play with other musicians, in the context of a song. Too many players can play like crazy, but have no concept of playing for the song. Just because you can shred doesn't mean you can play with an ear for taste, texture and appropriateness. Look what Vai did when he killed that one Whitesnake album. (mind you, maybe he thought that if he could over-play enough, people would be less likely to notice that the songs actually sucked @ss too....)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
Last edited by axemanchris at Dec 3, 2008,
#5
Well, I'm not certain, but I think that recording was just an example of what the quality would be like if he actually recorded a demo.

If that's true, TS, then don't forget, even if that sounded good, if you record a song in full, it could sound rubbish. It isn't all about the recording quality (although that is a big part). It's also about how you mix a song you record. If you mix it badly, the song could sound a lot worse than it is.
There is poetry in despair.
#6
It was just a test at the quality. I'm not going to shred for 2-5 minutes, put power chords behind it, and call it a "song."

Thanks for the help though.
#7
Yeah, a few more questions did pop up too:
1. How old do you have to be as a musician before you could be taken seriously for a live act, what are some popular environments, etc.? (I'm 14, and I really doubt that there's much room for it past school environment things, and that's a load of bull****. Although I do partake in them...I really doubt a bunch of moms and dads compare to a real audience.)

2. Do you think starting off by giving away my music for free and using means of advertisement such as Youtube to show off my playing would help more then actually expecting to sell anything?
#8
Quote by Brian 1.0
Yeah, a few more questions did pop up too:
1. How old do you have to be as a musician before you could be taken seriously for a live act, what are some popular environments, etc.? (I'm 14, and I really doubt that there's much room for it past school environment things, and that's a load of bull****. Although I do partake in them...I really doubt a bunch of moms and dads compare to a real audience.)

2. Do you think starting off by giving away my music for free and using means of advertisement such as Youtube to show off my playing would help more then actually expecting to sell anything?


1. Age is not important.
You'd be surprised of WHO those moms and dads ARE or who they know.
ANY gig is great gig!

2. Never give away your music for free. Always ask for "something". After all, its something you created and put work into.
Youtube is a great "showcase" and advertising tool. Great place to let people know where your next gig is. Give then samples with the option to buy or come see you.