#1
Hello, I have been playing guitar for about 2 years now.

Over the time that I have been playing, I have noticed that I have the ability to easily remember how to play songs shortly after learning them. To me it appears my ability to do this has grown exponentially.

I mean one month I remember how to play all of American Idiot (song not album) and the next month I can remember all of what I have learned of Bloodmeat (so far).

What I am asking is, what do you think allows us to exponentially increase our ability to retain how to play a song once we learn it?
#2
Because if you repeat something often enough it will stay in your memory, think back to how many times you played that riff when you were learning a new song.
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#4
Quote by gpowsang
Hello, I have been playing guitar for about 2 years now.

Over the time that I have been playing, I have noticed that I have the ability to easily remember how to play songs shortly after learning them. To me it appears my ability to do this has grown exponentially.

I mean one month I remember how to play all of American Idiot (song not album) and the next month I can remember all of what I have learned of Bloodmeat (so far).

What I am asking is, what do you think allows us to exponentially increase our ability to retain how to play a song once we learn it?


You're just like really smart N stuff
shred is gaudy music
#5
i personally just remember the key and the movement pieces and it pretty much stays in my memory forever.
#6
^wat i mean to say is what do u think increases our ability to retain more of what we learned than before.

Like When I forst started playing in band class I had trouble retaining where all the notes for "Hit the Road Jack", but now I have no problem where on my guitar to play alot more complex songs after only having played them once.
#7
the mistake you make is by trying to "memorize" it vs learning it.

same principles as from school - if you try to simply memorize, come exam time you will blank - however if you actually learn it, it becomes natural.

repetition is essential, but dont memorize, LEARN

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#8
Quote by z4twenny
i personally just remember the key and the movement pieces and it pretty much stays in my memory forever.



thats what i am talking about, how are we able to remember more and more stuff in a constant amount of time.

For example remembering 10 notes after one hour of trying it, then (1 year later) be able to remember 100 notes in just 5 minutes.
#9
repetition, like multiplaication and adding, you just remember by practising over and over, like i just learnt the intro riff to black dog, played it maybe 20-25 times to get it down just as the tab says, but i got it.

i find it helps to have a peice of paper with all the names of songs and riffs you no, i no 28 riffs and 14 songs (with/out solo's)
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#10
Because when you're playing guitar, you are repeating a pattern which your brain recognizes in MANY different ways.
#13
Quote by gpowsang
thats what i am talking about, how are we able to remember more and more stuff in a constant amount of time.

For example remembering 10 notes after one hour of trying it, then (1 year later) be able to remember 100 notes in just 5 minutes.


everyone thinks differently, my way is pretty simple. i just explained how it is how i learn, but you might be different. i never found remembering how to play songs difficult once i realized what keys were and i could identify intervals by ear.
#14
Really? I thought anyone plays a song and then remembers it. It takes me a while to remember the jazz pieces I've learned, but I can play it without referring to the sheet music, unlike my Alto Sax buddy.

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#15
Quote by gpowsang
thats what i am talking about, how are we able to remember more and more stuff in a constant amount of time.

For example remembering 10 notes after one hour of trying it, then (1 year later) be able to remember 100 notes in just 5 minutes.

it's also a matter of focus and the fact that it's something that you're personally into.

If I learn a song that I've listened to many times because I happen to like it, it will be easy for me to remember it inside and out. But if I learn a song that I've never heard before and I don't particularly care for, chances are it will be a bit more difficult.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Dec 3, 2008,
#16
whats AABA?
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#17
Quote by nowa90
whats AABA?


it's a particular musical form commonly used in jazz standards.

A section
A section ( repeated)
B section ( also referred to as the bridge)
A section
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#18
yea i wish i had the memory i had for guitar in school
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#19
Quote by GuitarMunky
it's a particular musical form commonly used in jazz standards.

A section
A section ( repeated)
B section ( also referred to as the bridge)
A section



isnt this similar to the structure of most songs?:

(Intro-verse-chorus) = A
(Verse-Chorus) = A
(Bridge) = B
(Chorus) = A
#20
Songs that are not complex take me like 3 plays to learn them but in order to retain them you have to play them over periods of time. Like 1 week. But complex songs beyond my level of playing take at least a month before it stays there for good. Sometimes these things come with experience, you subconsciously pick up tips for remembering.
#21
Because when you first start learning, you have so many things to learn that it clutters your mind.

For instance, alternate picking and string skipping. Those were two things that really were hard for me, but as I learned more songs that used them then I started to do it easier. Now it just comes natural to me, so learning a song is easier because it is technically easier to play.

A majority of the songs that I have a hard time learning are the ones that have a lot of timing issues. Santeria is an example of that, I cannot get that damn solo down but I can sure as hell remember the notes.
#22
When you start out learning, you have to remember how to play the chords itself and how to pick and stuff. After that you only have to remember the "order" in what to play something, and ur brain begins recognizing connections.

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#23
As you play more, melody and movement become more easily engrained in your mind.
I found since I picked up studying theory, my memory for music has increased greatly.
#24
As many have said before, it is repetition that allows you to remember stuff. Repetition creates muscle memory, and soon you will be playing stuff without even thinking about it!
#25
Learn 100 more songs and then re-evaluate your opinion. It's not exponential. You can't just keep learning more and more songs without ever forgetting any - unless you make a concious effort to play every song you've ever learned on a regular basis.

Memorization is ok in the beginning - but in the long run, you're going to have to learn how to fill in the blanks on your own. (improv)

I'd be impressed by anyone who could memorize 50 decent solos note for note.
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#26
I think one of the most important things is that you heared the song a lot. I can like play songs I heard a lot in one go with the guitar pro tab, and then like already remember it (If there are vocals/drum backing me up so I don't play the parts in the wrong order) And I just improvise the solo's, as guitarist stated it's impossible to remember a lot of solo's, and there's no use for it anyway.

But I have the same thing you talk about, you memorize stuff faster and faster. You also learn faster and faster, I for example took 3 years of good practice getting my fingerpickingskills to what they are today, but I learned playing the same speed with pick in like 2 months.
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#27
Quote by Tyler Durden
the mistake you make is by trying to "memorize" it vs learning it.

same principles as from school - if you try to simply memorize, come exam time you will blank - however if you actually learn it, it becomes natural.

repetition is essential, but dont memorize, LEARN


Bravo, good post
#28
Ha! No-one really specifically answered the original question, which as i saw it, was why do we memorize songs faster over time.

Ahem, here my psychology studies come to use.

There is no straight answer because our brain is so complex, but it is studied that people (For example Cab drivers) who have to memorize a lot in their daily life, eventually in few years develop a more advanced memory system than normal people. There are literally physical changes in the brain which are seeable through fMRI. They are then capable of recalling from and saving things in their LTM faster.
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#29
Quote by Birchall17
Because if you repeat something often enough it will stay in your memory, think back to how many times you played that riff when you were learning a new song.


That is correct, but don't assume that it will be the right thing that stays in your memory. The teachers here will know of many cases where students have memorised things incorrectly . . . .

Memorisation is like anything else in that it needs to be practised. People who say they can't memorise should devote some time everyday to improving it and they will soon find the problem goes away.

There are things you can do to help in your memorisation attempts:
1. Try to remember in great detail everything about the music, notes, chords, dynamics, melody - everything.
2. Associate the music with feelings - music that provokes strong feelings is more easily memorised.
3. Use mnemonics. A lot of people do this when they first learn to read music (Every Good Boy Deserves Fun, for the notes on the stave). But if your melody is AACDF you could use All Alan Could Do For . . . .
4. Associate music with objects and pictures

That's just a few but there are others. Just practising it in the right way will help
#31
Sold my soul to the devil for uber memorization skills. I think that was a bad decision...