#1
Okay well, I have a problem memorizing scales other than the a major, is there a pattern of doing this to improve my guitar skills?
#2
Same way you learn a song :P (everyone learns songs differently)
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#3
A major scale is Root-second(ninth)-third-4th-5th(13th)-6th-7th. All other scales have some notes sharped or flattened (for example, the Natural minor is R-9-b (flat) 3-4-13-b6-b7).
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#4
All scales are done throught the same process: learn the 5 shapes of the scale and use those for every key just start on the right note.
For the major for example, just learn the five different shapes in one key (in your case A) and just move the shapes according to whatever key you want to play, the scale is the same for every key so just do the same thing.
#5
Quote by oneblackened
A major scale is Root-second(ninth)-third-4th-5th(13th)-6th-7th. All other scales have some notes sharped or flattened (for example, the Natural minor is R-9-b (flat) 3-4-13-b6-b7).

I either don't understand what you mean or you are totally wrong. Could you explain better?
#6
It's from a completely theory-based point of view. Major scale is let's just say... 1-2-3-4-5-6-7.
All other scales have some notes from 2-7 changed (either sharpened-up a half step, or flatted-a half step down). For example, the Natural Minor scale is 1-2-Flat 3 (this is also a minor third)-4-5-flat 6-flat 7.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#7
Quote by TrasherFromHell
All scales are done throught the same process: learn the 5 shapes of the scale and use those for every key just start on the right note.
For the major for example, just learn the five different shapes in one key (in your case A) and just move the shapes according to whatever key you want to play, the scale is the same for every key so just do the same thing.



This. Im learning and memorizing all my scale shapes first, and then playing them at different keys.

Im suprised at how quickly I can remember the scale shapes.
#8
sing: do ray mi so fa la tee do. louie armstrong said "if you cant sing it, you cant really play it". if you know scales by ear playing them on an instrument will come naturally. and it will seriously help you become a better musician.
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#9
My advice is to know how a scale 'feels', what sound the intervals create. In knowing that you can learn the intervals easily and be able to construct a scale from any root.
#10
Quote by TrasherFromHell
All scales are done throught the same process: learn the 5 shapes of the scale and use those for every key just start on the right note.
For the major for example, just learn the five different shapes in one key (in your case A) and just move the shapes according to whatever key you want to play, the scale is the same for every key so just do the same thing.

Not really - technically that's not learning scales at all, that's just learning scale patterns. If you try to learn them just from patterns then yes, you're going to struggle, because you're trying to learn a massive, seemingly arbitrary pattern. Also there's the added complication of, as you learn more scales, finding yourself learning the exact same thing several times over.

TS, if you want to learn scales then you need to do just that, learn scales, not just patterns. Learn the notes of the fretboard, learn about intervals then learn about scale formulae and how to construct scales. Have a read of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns section. It's also vital to spend time familiarising yourself with the sound of a scale so you can recognise it and know when it's going to fit.

The problem is that because guitarists are so reliant on tabs and tend to shy away from standard notation, and even worse simply listening to our istrument, there tends to be a topsy-turvy view of scales.

A guitarist will often think of scales like this...

The shape...the notes it contains....how it sounds

When really they should be approaching them like this...

How it sounds...the notes it contains....the shape
Actually called Mark!

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#12
Practice a few scales at a time. Say them as you're playing them- do the same with chords. I'll sing the chord names as I play them. Once you have mastered a few at a time, add another group and repeat the cycle. Repitition usually helps. practice practice practice.
#13
Quote by steven seagull
Not really - technically that's not learning scales at all, that's just learning scale patterns. If you try to learn them just from patterns then yes, you're going to struggle, because you're trying to learn a massive, seemingly arbitrary pattern. Also there's the added complication of, as you learn more scales, finding yourself learning the exact same thing several times over.

TS, if you want to learn scales then you need to do just that, learn scales, not just patterns. Learn the notes of the fretboard, learn about intervals then learn about scale formulae and how to construct scales. Have a read of Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the columns section. It's also vital to spend time familiarising yourself with the sound of a scale so you can recognise it and know when it's going to fit.

The problem is that because guitarists are so reliant on tabs and tend to shy away from standard notation, and even worse simply listening to our istrument, there tends to be a topsy-turvy view of scales.

A guitarist will often think of scales like this...

The shape...the notes it contains....how it sounds

When really they should be approaching them like this...

How it sounds...the notes it contains....the shape



This is where Im confused.

Isnt that the same thing?

I think learning the notes on the fretboard is important, of course, but since you can start a scale in any Key, wouldnt learning the shape *first* be more important?
#14
No, the shape is the least important thing, it's just where the notes of a scale happen to be...the scale is a musical entity, it exists independently of your instrument, C major is C major whether it's on a guitar, oboe, violin or kazoo.

you should approach it this way

What key am I in and what chords do I have, what notes do I have within those chords and what scales do they suggest, out of those scales what kind of sound do I want here....right, where can I play this.

too often it's

Right I have this shape, I'll play it.

If you want to use scales effectively you have to think about how they sound and also take into account the context.
Actually called Mark!

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#15
Quote by steven seagull
No, the shape is the least important thing, it's just where the notes of a scale happen to be...the scale is a musical entity, it exists independently of your instrument, C major is C major whether it's on a guitar, oboe, violin or kazoo.

you should approach it this way

What key am I in and what chords do I have, what notes do I have within those chords and what scales do they suggest, out of those scales what kind of sound do I want here....right, where can I play this.

too often it's

Right I have this shape, I'll play it.

If you want to use scales effectively you have to think about how they sound and also take into account the context.



I will have to take your advice then.

Right now, at my stage of learning it sounds confusing as anything, but Im sure it will all make sense soon =)