#1



carribbean blue.


how would I accomplish the burst? (I'm going to build a guitar in a couple months)
I already know I'm gonna use quilted maple.
#4
How good are you at painting? haha.

It's not incredibly hard if you follow the tutorial.
Gear
Fender Thinline Telecaster Deluxe

1983 Aria Pro II XX Deluxe Flying V

2007 S101 EGU34

1963 Kay Vanguard

1964 Kay Vanguard

AXL Badwater SRO

Hondo Strat

1974 Acoustic(brand) 134 4x10 combo

Epiphone Valve Jr.
#5
haha I'm decent as long as I don't have to paint figures
oh, which type of burst should I use (tutorial)
#6
I like this one. http://www.projectguitar.com/tut/burst.htm

Cut the paper to your liking. And if you have trouble with that one, use the strat tutorial, or whichever would correspond wit the guitar youre making.
Gear
Fender Thinline Telecaster Deluxe

1983 Aria Pro II XX Deluxe Flying V

2007 S101 EGU34

1963 Kay Vanguard

1964 Kay Vanguard

AXL Badwater SRO

Hondo Strat

1974 Acoustic(brand) 134 4x10 combo

Epiphone Valve Jr.
#7
Will he still be able to get a transparent finish with spray cans, though? Thats my only concern with the PG tutorial method.

And also, whats with the 11 pole pieces on those pups?
#8
verrry carefurry young grasshopper....

I think there's 12 smaller pole pieces, but I could be way off... we'll have to ask one of the experts on here...
------

Shwiggity.
#10
Oh good Lord, there's way more to the process than that. First you need very nicely quilted maple like you see on that Carvin, which will run you at least $85+ in a thickness that can be carved. That Carvin looks like it's got a 4-5/8" cap, maybe a smidge deeper. That stuff also looks like it's at least AAA or AAAA grade figuring ( depending on what scale you're using, hahaaa ), which apparently just can't be bought cheaply in substantial thicknesses, unless you're a wholesaler or something.

Then, stain it black or extremely dark green, and sand that off until the stain is just left in the "valleys", with your "ridges" all the way back to natural. That's why the figuring looks so dramatic and has such extreme contrast, it's dark in the "valleys", and the "ridges" are lighter. Then, once you've got the valleys black/dark, you can do a few different things, but the easiest would probably be to stain it that middle green color. Then clear coat the whole thing, and then hit the edges with your blue candy coat, or translucent lacquer, whichever you can get your hands on. However, if you use the translucent lacquer, you might have to put that straight on top of your green dye instead of waiting to put it on top of your first few clear coats.

You can definitely use those tutorials to get a good burst with the blue color, but as you can see, getting a figured maple top to look so good doesn't just happen from blasting translucent lacquers on there. If you did that the figure would look like this:



Which is still cool, because quilted maple is cool in general, but without darkening the deeper portion of the figure to increase the contrast, it's not nearly as dramatic or "deep" looking. Some companies do more than just a two color darkening process, and I believe Carvin is one of them. I think they do 3 steps. In that case, you would start with something dark like black or super dark green, sand that off until just a bit is left, move to a medium dark shade and sand THAT off so it protrudes some from the original dark color, then head for the pure green color, and proceed from there with the clear + blue, or blue + clear if you're using the translucent lacquer. That multi-color step process gives you the very gradual shift in color you see from dark to light green/blue in the figuring.

Sounds like a pain in the booty, but the results are clearly worth it, just look at the figuring on that Carvin! Looks deep enough to dive in for a swim
#11
And that is why we have lumberjack.
Gear
Fender Thinline Telecaster Deluxe

1983 Aria Pro II XX Deluxe Flying V

2007 S101 EGU34

1963 Kay Vanguard

1964 Kay Vanguard

AXL Badwater SRO

Hondo Strat

1974 Acoustic(brand) 134 4x10 combo

Epiphone Valve Jr.
#12
Quote by guitarcam123
theres 12, there 12 string pickups



Heehee, nah, all Carvin open-faced humbuckers look like that yo! Check out their site, I forget why, but all their pickups look just like that with a bazillion pieces in there.

#13
Quote by chuckflan333
And that is why we have lumberjack.



Why thank you, good sir! I must defer all compliments to the other luthiers on here though, as I'm a peewee noob compared to the people I learned that stuff from. Troll around in build threads by LP Addict, jscustomguitars, and especially ormsbyguitars, and that's where you'll do some real learning! Ormsby does tons of staining, check out his thread on the TIGER, which shows pictures of what I'm actually talking about.

Here it is!
#14
I thought I knew a lot already. Then i read what you said about the curly maple. And now i know that. You learn something new every single day.
Gear
Fender Thinline Telecaster Deluxe

1983 Aria Pro II XX Deluxe Flying V

2007 S101 EGU34

1963 Kay Vanguard

1964 Kay Vanguard

AXL Badwater SRO

Hondo Strat

1974 Acoustic(brand) 134 4x10 combo

Epiphone Valve Jr.
#15
Quote by lumberjack
Oh good Lord, there's way more to the process than that. First you need very nicely quilted maple like you see on that Carvin, which will run you at least $85+ in a thickness that can be carved. That Carvin looks like it's got a 4-5/8" cap, maybe a smidge deeper. That stuff also looks like it's at least AAA or AAAA grade figuring ( depending on what scale you're using, hahaaa ), which apparently just can't be bought cheaply in substantial thicknesses, unless you're a wholesaler or something.

Then, stain it black or extremely dark green, and sand that off until the stain is just left in the "valleys", with your "ridges" all the way back to natural. That's why the figuring looks so dramatic and has such extreme contrast, it's dark in the "valleys", and the "ridges" are lighter. Then, once you've got the valleys black/dark, you can do a few different things, but the easiest would probably be to stain it that middle green color. Then clear coat the whole thing, and then hit the edges with your blue candy coat, or translucent lacquer, whichever you can get your hands on. However, if you use the translucent lacquer, you might have to put that straight on top of your green dye instead of waiting to put it on top of your first few clear coats.

You can definitely use those tutorials to get a good burst with the blue color, but as you can see, getting a figured maple top to look so good doesn't just happen from blasting translucent lacquers on there. If you did that the figure would look like this:



Which is still cool, because quilted maple is cool in general, but without darkening the deeper portion of the figure to increase the contrast, it's not nearly as dramatic or "deep" looking. Some companies do more than just a two color darkening process, and I believe Carvin is one of them. I think they do 3 steps. In that case, you would start with something dark like black or super dark green, sand that off until just a bit is left, move to a medium dark shade and sand THAT off so it protrudes some from the original dark color, then head for the pure green color, and proceed from there with the clear + blue, or blue + clear if you're using the translucent lacquer. That multi-color step process gives you the very gradual shift in color you see from dark to light green/blue in the figuring.

Sounds like a pain in the booty, but the results are clearly worth it, just look at the figuring on that Carvin! Looks deep enough to dive in for a swim


What he said...

Get a 1/2 inch thick, bookmatched quilted top.

For the finish, I am afraid to say, this is a spray gun and compressor job.
If you have access to these, cool, if not I can advise.

Ideally, you want a small, gravity fed (paint container on the top) mini jet spray gun, with a 0.8-1.2mm tip.

These are smaller than regular spray guns, consume less air, enable you to use all of the paint and are able to provide a suitable sized spray pattern, which for a guitar, should be 4 inches wide, when 4 inches from the surface. Adjust the paint delivery, until you get a nice pattern/coverage, at that distance and width.

The nozzle should be adjusted to give a vertical spray pattern (narrow and tall).

Do as suggested above. Get some black stain and stain the top.

Sand back, to see the contrast. Do it again if you feel it needs it.

Now you want to seal the grain with a grain sealer, shellac etc.

Let this set up fully for a few days and give it a quick sand with about P400 grit paper (always on a block where possible).

Now you want to get yourself a kit of House of Kolor UC35 or UFC35 clear coat.
UFC35 allegedly gives an even higher gloss, but the gloss on UC35 is ridiculous anyway, it is also much more resistant to chemicals etc that could damage the finish.

This stuff is professional use and is the best money can buy. I suspect it is what Perry Ormsby uses.

The kit would be 1 Pint of "Kosmic Klear" Clear coat (UC35-PT), 1/2 Pint of Hardner (KU150-HP) and some reducer (thinners) RU310/311 depending on the temperature of where you will paint, seek advice from where you purchase it.

The other thing you want, is some KK Kandy Koncentrate. This comes in small 2oz bottles (part of their Airbrush Series) an dis a concentrated colour, that can be added to the UC35 Lacquer to tint it's colour.

This lacquer, is part of the Urethane Enamel System. Keep to the same system (ie. not Acryllic)

I would say probably KK09 Organic Green and KK05 Cobalt Blue. You may also want to look at Oriental Blue, but I forget the colour code for that.

You can get all of that from TCP Global on Ebay, if you are in the USA.

TCP Global on Ebay (Clicky)

That will link you to the UC35 Clear and if you look down the left, you will see links to all of the other stuff.

When ordering, you want the original KK Koncentrates in 2oz, NOT their premixed ones.

Once you have applied the tinted areas, you can then clear the whole guitar with the un-tinted lacquer.

Buy a gallon of cheap "Gunwash", for cleaning up and running through the spray gun. YOU MUST, clean the spray gun as soon as you have finished using it and between Tints/un-tinted. If you leave it for 4 hours, job done, your gun is screwed

The good thing about this system, is that the lacquer will set HARD AS ROCK on 24 hours at 70 degrees F. So it can be cut and buffed the next day.

The fumes the paint gives off, is hazardous, so make sure you use good ventilation, while maintaining dust control and use a GOOD respirator designed for Organic Compounds and Isocyanates (can be bought on ebay).

If you have access to an air fed spray helmet, even better.

Any questions, just ask.
#16
thanks for your help :]
I'll probably be coming to one of you (lumberjack or skeet uk) when I start the project.... which will be around march

I'm gonna do it over spring break so I'll have a whole week to do it, which I'm hoping will be more than sufficient time.
#17
dude if you can pull off that finishing job, carvin may have to hire you as a guitar finishing tech or something.
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