#1
i don't consider myself a beginner at guitar

but in theory probably a step lower from beginner...

so tell me, where should i start?
#2
if your in college... id suggest taking a class there... otherwise you could go out and buy a book on music theory and read anything in there that interests you.
#3
well first you should start by searching this website.
Deacon of Zeppelinism PM TheHeartbreaker to join
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#4
look up Freepower!! and read his sticky

if you go to MT at the bottom you'll see people with green names..
he's one of them.

after that.. check out the MT sticky, then the AT sticky

and UG is filled with lessons on theory
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#6
Quote by PhillyHendrix
i don't consider myself a beginner at guitar

but in theory probably a step lower from beginner...

so tell me, where should i start?



I reccomend getting the book The Guitar Grimoire - Scales & Modes

it has done me very well, it has all kinda of interesting stuff, such as numeric formulas poly chords (very hard) and goes through all the modes of every scale (which is simple once you know what they are)
#7
I find it makes it much easier it you first research what intervals are (the distance on the fretboard between 2 notes) and how they work together to make chords and different sounding scales, sad/happy etc...

They are the basic building block of music, without knowing about them i think it is more difficult.
#10
Major and minor scales and chords, very basic music reading skills, and notes on the piano are all fine places to start.

The first is essential and the other two will be extremely helpful in making learning easier, faster, and more comprehensive
#12
And don't forget you can always ask questions here too...

Crusades, FP lessons, and anything else that was suggested are a good place to start.

To add, it's a good idea to start learning the notes on the fretboard. It will be a slow journey, so you should make the best of it and start now. It will help you take the theory that you learn and apply it to the guitar, or at least make that process easier.

#14
Learn the Major Scale. How to construct it. The patterns on the guitar. The interval structures. Then how to harmonize it (Diatonic Chords). And how it forms the cornerstone of western music theory. Then you will have a good reference point to relate everything back to as you advance in your aquisition of more music theory. - Everything is compared back to the major scale.
Si
#15
Learn the modes. And by that I don't mean play them a few times, and forget about them. I also don't mean memorize the fretboard positions of every mode in every key (although that can be helpful later on). What I mean is learn the modes. Learn what they sound like, what feelings you want to evoke with them, and how to switch between them. After that, basic harmony should be next.
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#17
Quote by SG Man Forever
Learn the modes. And by that I don't mean play them a few times, and forget about them. I also don't mean memorize the fretboard positions of every mode in every key (although that can be helpful later on). What I mean is learn the modes. Learn what they sound like, what feelings you want to evoke with them, and how to switch between them. After that, basic harmony should be next.

To be honest I wouldn't even go near modes for the time being - best to pretty much forget they even exist.

You can cover them later down the line when you have a grasp of the basics.
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#18
don't go near modes.
You won't understand the visualisation and the link between sounds and theory of modes, if u don't get the basics.

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#19
Quote by steven seagull
To be honest I wouldn't even go near modes for the time being - best to pretty much forget they even exist.

You can cover them later down the line when you have a grasp of the basics.

They were the first bit of theory I learned, and my learning them, it allowed me to very quickly expand my musical vocabulary and improv skills
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#20
Quote by SG Man Forever
They were the first bit of theory I learned, and my learning them, it allowed me to very quickly expand my musical vocabulary and improv skills

It's not actually possible to learn modes if you haven't first learned all the theory groundwork that puts them in context - so whatever it was you think you learned you didn't learn it properly.
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#21
Quote by steven seagull
It's not actually possible to learn modes if you haven't first learned all the theory groundwork that puts them in context - so whatever it was you think you learned you didn't learn it properly.

Explain to me how it's not possible to understand "half step = 1 fret, whole step = 2," and then to learn the intervals of the modes.

I suppose if you want to get technical, the first "theory" I learned was the names of the notes, and where they were on the fretboard, and then the scale shape for C major (which I never used at that point) I knew the minor scale long before I knew what it was called. I learned it by playing System of a Down songs, and noticing that nearly every riff they wrote used the following notes: C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, and Bb. Thus, without knowing any theory, I thus I knew two modes, and didn't even know what modes were. Then, I saw a lesson in guitar world magazine that said the modes could be thought of as scales, so I said "cool, I'll give this a look." I memorized the intervals of the modes, and then about a week later, read how they related to the major scale, which I at the time viewed as, "oh cool. They can all be part of the same scale." That basically was me sort of figuring out the concept of relative majors and minors.

Assuming you know the major scale, and where the notes are on the guitar, there is no reason on Earth that the modes would be impossible to learn with only that knowledge.
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#22
Then they weren't "the first theory you learned", were they?

Actually called Mark!

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#23
Quote by steven seagull
Then they weren't "the first theory you learned", were they?


I guess not, but in my defense, the guy did say he wasn't a beginner at guitar, so it's probably a safe assumption he knows the notes on the guitar.
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