#1
I played a gig last night, and for the first time we had less than 150 people, in fact only had about 50 or 60 because everyone thought it was tonight like it usually is. Well, we played absolutely horrible because of it. People still said they were impressed, but our drummer forgot to end songs, my solos were just lifeless, and our singer forgot a few lyrics...we just seemed disorganized and out of focus...so how do you guys keep the focus and energy when a gig just sucks? cause I know once we venture out of our mainstay crowd, we could have some bad gigs.
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#2
I know that for some people this is easier said than done, but honestly you just have to play each show like it's your last one and you're in front of thousands of people.
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#3
You cant play for 50-60 people? Your first gig had 150+ people? Yo sucked because you didnt focus and play with energy. Have fun with your band mates and forget the crowd if its not feeding you good energy. Maybe then things would turn around. You should be able to play your songs with or without a crowd thats no excuse. What do you do at practice suck becuase its just you?
#4
Try new stuff! Improvise something, extend an ending. Do something insane, and make sure your audience knows what you're doing.

At my last show on Saturday, a mic stand fell on my head while I was playing drums... I grabbed it quick and held it in my teeth while I kept playing, and finally someone came over and picked it up for me. Take things like that that could be awful and make them into something funny or good. I only missed a few beats, but the mistakes were worth it when the audience congratulated me after the show for one of the most amusing moments they'd ever seen in concert.

But yeah, definitely try new things. Maybe throw in some sick fills on guitar.... YOU need to be the ones to breathe life into a performance. Your drummer forgot to end songs? So just keep playing! In a live setting, you can do whatever you want. Add an extra solo.... if your singer forgets the words, have him go crowd surfing. Stuff like that. You can make a performance far more exciting if you are willing to be exciting, even when you have a small crowd.
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#5
Quote by therudycometh


YOU need to be the ones to breathe life into a performance.
You can make a performance far more exciting if you are willing to be exciting, even when you have a small crowd.

This and this is what I was getting at. You cant blame the crowd. The poor carpenter blames his tools the boring band blames the crowd.
#6
Quote by Teh1337Hax0rz
I know that for some people this is easier said than done, but honestly you just have to play each show like it's your last one and you're in front of thousands of people.


+1

If this happens again, you should use it as an opportunity to make the show more special for those who did show up...make it more personal. I remember seeing Breaking Benjamin at a sold out show...with about 50 people there. There was a terrible winter storm and very few people got out in it to see the show. Hands down the best concert I've been to, it was like a private show for me and my friends. We made up about 1/5 of the audience!
#7
Its all about being consistant. Every gig should be treated the same, all gigs are equal (except ones that pay well are more equal). If your a young band (i assume you are) its something you will have to get used to as it happens a fair bit early on.
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#9
Look at it this way, if you need 150 people to play enthusiasticaly, how do you manage to rehearse?
Because at rehearsals you are playing for one another rather than a crowd.

When there is little or no crowd at a gig, look at it as an opportunity to get paid for a rehearsal and play to try and impress each other, (but don't forget to include the crowd)
Just feel the music and run with it and give it your best performance simply for your own enjoyment rather than for the crowd.
#10
Thanks, all of this helps, just cause I wanna talk with the guys about it...and yeah we had 150+ at our last few gigs...our band consists of baseball and football players from my school (Sacred Heart Division 1), so we get a good turnout from knowing so many people...I was just kind of pissed cause I felt like our drummer (whose very good) had no interest in playing the songs correctly, and ****ed around a lot (we are a jam band, but random drumming can be very annoying at times) and our bass player and singer had to talk before every song to remember the chords, im sittin there like wtf lets go...thanks for the input though, and we all need a good kick in the ass sometimes
'I love her, but I love to fish...I'm gonna miss her"