#1
I just dropped about $200 on used recording equipment to play around in the bedroom and just record some covers and other crap for no real reason. I have tried both my Peavey Classic 30 and my Crate V18, running through a Shure 57 to a M-Audio interface and recording with audacity. Anyway, I'm not using too much distortion but everything I play sounds thin and digital, like I have about 7 crappy distortion pedals with a solid state amp. Is there a way to get my tube amps full tone out of this equipment? I know I'm a cheapskate.

Thanks. If you need samples of what I'm talking about, let me know and I'll post something.
Last edited by drewfromutah at Dec 4, 2008,
#2
Samples, please.
Wait, are you using all 7 pedals at once? That could do it...
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#3
Quote by pandasxsharpies
Samples, please.
Wait, are you using all 7 pedals at once? That could do it...


No, I have 0 pedals on. It sounds like I'm using 7 pedals, though.
#6
is it just a fizzy, trebly scratchy kinda tone? or is there something else thats distorting? what kind of used equipment did you buy? what sort of mics are you using? or are you going direct in?
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#7
The only way to get a real good sound out of a guitar amp is to mic it up, IMO.
#9
Quote by Kivarenn82
is it just a fizzy, trebly scratchy kinda tone? or is there something else thats distorting? what kind of used equipment did you buy? what sort of mics are you using? or are you going direct in?

Yes, trebly, thin, exactly. As I said above, it is what you get if you run a line of distortion pedals up to a crappy solid state amp. I'm using the M Audio recording interface, and a Shure SM57 mic.
#10
Quote by drewfromutah
I am micing it.



Sounds like you need better ones.
#12
yea, the way your amp is set up will be crucial too. the most obvious solution at the moment is to cut some of your treble.. boost some mids too to sort of cover up some of the scratchier sounds.

SM-57's don't really like to be punished with too many high freq's. they perform best with a good amount of midrange, although they have no trouble picking up the more airy sounding highs either.

but yea, set up your amp a little differently than you would than if you were just jamming or whatever. more mids, less treble, maybe less gain too if its hurting your clarity.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#13
Quote by Kivarenn82
yea, the way your amp is set up will be crucial too. the most obvious solution at the moment is to cut some of your treble.. boost some mids too to sort of cover up some of the scratchier sounds.

SM-57's don't really like to be punished with too many high freq's. they perform best with a good amount of midrange, although they have no trouble picking up the more airy sounding highs either.

but yea, set up your amp a little differently than you would than if you were just jamming or whatever. more mids, less treble, maybe less gain too if its hurting your clarity.


Will do. I'm going to fiddle with settings a bit and if I can't get something to my liking I'll post a sample and see what you guys think.
#14
Couldn't fix it. Here's a sample.

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/drewfromutah/music/all/play479146

Sounds like total garbage. I know I can get a better tone with this mic and interface. I promise my tone is really good when I play... It's just getting lost somewhere.
Last edited by drewfromutah at Dec 4, 2008,
#15
maybe move the mic back an inch or 2 and change the angle of the mic to the front of the amp. Angle the mic a bit and point it at the edge of the speaker cone. Rather than having it straight on to the middle of the speaker cone.

Just experiment with mic angles, mic distance, amp settings and stuff.
Last edited by dylan_r at Dec 5, 2008,
#16
Quote by dylan_r
maybe move the mic back an inch or 2 and change the angle of the mic to the front of the amp. Angle the mic a bit and point it at the edge of the speaker cone. Rather than having it straight on to the middle of the speaker cone.

Just experiment with mic angles, mic distance, amp settings and stuff.


^^ this.

do you have the amp at ear level? try to direct the amp directly at your face so you can hear what your mic is hearing. it'll be easier to correct any tone problems you might not be hearing otherwise.

different distances and angles change the tone up drastically, if the mic is very close with no tilt, then its gonna be picking pretty much all of the treble freq's, if you pull it back then it'll begin to catch the mid and bass freq's. if you tilt the mic a bit, it'll change the way the highs hit the mic diaphragm. it doesn't necessarily attenuate them, but changes it up a bit.

also, miking different spots on the speaker will change it up too. see what you like best when comparing the cone sound to the speaker edge sound.

tl;dr

point the amp at your face so you can really hear what your amp sounds like, and experiment with the mic!
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#17
Thanks guys. The way I have my mic is tilted about 45 degrees up towards the amp, touching the grill. I will try moving it back a bit.
Last edited by drewfromutah at Dec 5, 2008,
#19
Quote by drewfromutah
Should I be using the USB out on my interface or the RCA outs? I've been using the USB.


Couldn't hurt trying the RCAs...thats the way we always record.
#20
It shouldn't matter which outs you use. If anything, try reducing the master volume (if there is one) on your amp...an amp is more quiet recording than live.
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#22
then you'll definitely want to pull the mic back a bit.

you wouldn't stick you ear right on the cloth if you had you amp cranked would ya?

haha no its not quite the same, but pulling back or maybe moving it to a different spot will help.

and for myself, it'd be preferable to use the USB output. simply because by using the RCA you may not be getting the best levels for recording simply because with the RCA out, then you have more levels to fiddle with concerning the sound card and how high you have your mixer.

with USB you just plug it in and voila.. its set.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#24
sweet man! lets hear some new clips!
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#25
Quote by Kivarenn82
sweet man! lets hear some new clips!


Here you go. Please let me know what you think. Sorry the guitar is so quiet. I may turn it up a notch. I think it sounds very good for only spending about $200 max on recording equip.

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/drewfromutah/music/all/play480111n
Last edited by drewfromutah at Dec 5, 2008,
#26
no too shabby at all bud, i agree that the guitar could use a little volume. i like your drum sound too, i'm guessing that its a machine or a plugin, but it sounds very alive and airy. really good mix on that too
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