#1
what are the phrasings for "I want to leave her" and "I want her to leave"?
if i'm correct i think I want her to leave would be yo le quiero salir or am i wrong? tell me how to say each pleaseee
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#2
Yo quiero salirle, and Yo quiero salir.

EDIT: Err actually I missed a word, the second is really something else...
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Last edited by BillieJoeFreak: at Dec 4, 2008,
#3
I don't know what the word for leave is, but it'd be.

Yo quiero ella a (leave)

Idk, I'm only in spanish 1, and your avatar makes it hard to think
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#6
yo le quiero salir = I want to leave her.
yo quiero que (ella) salga = I want her to leave.

I'm not really sure though, get a native Spanish speaker to confirm. There are usually a few roaming through the pit. I'm an American Senior in college that took 4 years of Spanish in high school. I remember a lot considering, but still...
#7
If "leave" is as in a relationship, "Quiero dejarla" would be I want to leave her, and "Quiero que me deje" would be I want her to leave me. If you mean leave as in leave a place it would be "Quiero que se vaya"-I want her to leave.
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#9
its not so much the exact phrase its just i'm trying to get a beter understanding of direct/indirect objects

and no not as in a relationship. just leaving (salir) haha
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#10
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Entity said the correct way, all the the others are fail :P


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#12
You guys, you don't need the yo as quiero is "I want" because of the verb ending.
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#13
I am not all that fluent in spanish but I believe it's this:

I want to leave her = Yo quiero dejar la
I want her to leave = Yo quiero que ella se vaya

Salir or Salga = outside
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Last edited by Bertallica at Dec 4, 2008,
#14
"I want to leave her", out of the relationship context would be quite strange. At least we Spanish don't use leave on that sentence with the meaning of "salir", but as "dejar".

So, I want to leave her -> Quiero dejarla
and I want her to leave -> Quiero que salga, or quiero que se vaya (depending on the context)
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#15
Quote by I.O.T.M
You guys, you don't need the yo as quiero is "I want" because of the verb ending.


You don't NEED it, but there's nothing wrong with having it.
#16
It would be 1.- "Yo quiero dejarla" because "salir" as you guys said is exit or leave WHEN you're talking about yourself number 2 would be "Yo quiero que se vaya" you can also say this sentences without saying "Yo" (I) and it sounds better, trust me i'm Venezuelan.
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#17
Quote by Mahoru
"I want to leave her", out of the relationship context would be quite strange. At least we Spanish don't use leave on that sentence with the meaning of "salir", but as "dejar".

So, I want to leave her -> Quiero dejarla
and I want her to leave -> Quiero que salga, or quiero que se vaya (depending on the context)

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#18
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You don't NEED it, but there's nothing wrong with having it.

I didn't say anything was wrong with it, all I said was you don't need it.
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#19
holy freakin crap you all fail. ok TS spanish is my first language, when you say "leave" do you mean leave the room, or leave the relationship?

EDIT: oh wait i just saw your post.

I want to leave her: "Yo quiero dejarla" (Yoh kye-ro de-har-la)

I want her to leave: "Yo la deseo que salga" (Yoh la des-eyo keh sahl-gah)

some rough phonetic pronunciations for you too
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#20
Quote by gun4hire
holy freakin crap you all fail. ok TS spanish is my first language, when you say "leave" do you mean leave the room, or leave the relationship?

Too bad you missed both REAL LIVE ACTUAL Spanish people in this thread...
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^somebody get this man 30 million dollars.
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#21
or this

I want to leave her = Deseo dejarla

I want her to leave = Quisiera que ella se fuera
Imagination is more important than knowledge...
It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.
- Albert Einstein -
#22
Quote by Bertallica
or this

I want to leave her = Deseo dejarla

I want her to leave = Quisiera que ella se fuera


Are you a native speaker? It could very well be that I'm not fluent, but that second sentence seems very wrong.
#23
another question

could you explain to me the word "salga", what tense or use is that of? i've also heard someone say "digame" as a command for tell me why isnt it just "dime"?

i lold at how you typed out the phonetic spelling for me... i'm not completely spanish retarded lol
<Raven> I got so baked last night
<Raven> that I WOKE UP high o_o
<Raven> Do you have any idea how euphoric that is?
<Raven> I felt like I was being born.
#24
salga is like politely saying "get out" and "digame" and "dime" are essentially the same thing. In Spanish there are two variations of the second person(you): "tu" which is casual, normal spanish, and "usted" which is a more polite way, normally directed to unknown people. You would say "tu, dime" or "usted, digame".
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#25
I'm from México but I suck so bad at explaining grammar questions about my own language... But yes, listen to the real spanish guys who previously answered your first question.

I want to leave her = Quiero dejarla

I want her to leave = Quiero que ella ("Ella" is not necessary, really. Only if you want to be specific about "Her") se vaya.
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#26
Quote by madbasslover
Are you a native speaker? It could very well be that I'm not fluent, but that second sentence seems very wrong.

Nope. I am not fluent, but I've been around spanish my whole life, I understand it and I know that there are several ways to say the same thing, just like in english.

Quisiera is the same as quero which is the same as I want.

Fuera is the same as vaya which is the same as to leave.

Some people here have been saying to or "salga" but that means to exit. You'd use it more as "I want you to leave the room"
Imagination is more important than knowledge...
It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.
- Albert Einstein -
#27
If you're trying to say I want to break up with you it would be "Querio que nos rompamos'. And if you're saying the other phrase as 'I would like her to leave (place)" its: 'Querio que ella me de ja'
#28
proper way i was born in mexico btw

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#29
Quote by Bertallica
Nope. I am not fluent, but I've been around spanish my whole life, I understand it and I know that there are several ways to say the same thing, just like in english.

Quisiera is the same as quero which is the same as I want.

Fuera is the same as vaya which is the same as to leave.

Some people here have been saying to or "salga" but that means to exit. You'd use it more as "I want you to leave the room"


I know what quisiera and fuera mean, they're past tenses in the subjunctive. That's why what you said has me confused. To me, the way it read couldn't even be translated into English because it used two past tenses in the subjunctive.

EDIT:
proper way i was born in mexico btw

quitate de mi vista pinche bieja



This man speaks the truth.
#30
Quote by Rockoz
proper way i was born in mexico btw

quitate de mi vista pinche bieja


You're hilarious haha
#31
I want to leave her = Quiero dejarla. generally, use la/lo instead of le in this context

I want her to leave = Quiero que ella salga. if you don't yet know the subjunctive, then this is wrong.

i'm sure this has been answered by now, but i just wanted to show off
#33
"I want to leave her": Quiero dejarla.
""I want her to leave": Quiero que se vaya.
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