#1
So I am watching a video for Jazz is Dead, performing an instrumental version of The Grateful Dead's "Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodleloo", and Jimmy Herring pulls this stunt that I have heard before, but haven't, until recently, wondered how it's done.

At about forty-three seconds into the video, Jimmy begins to bend a note, and as he peaks the bend what sounds much like some form of feedback begins to resonate, but he controls it, ending his bend before it sounds as though chaos erupts.

Anyone know what he does, and how it can be replicated?

Thanks.

Edit: Posting a link helps.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kXozVen2bBo
Last edited by TheHeartbreaker at Dec 4, 2008,
#2
i think it's just a pinch harmonic that has the same tone as feedback
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#3
That would seem like a possibility, but the feedback sound doesn't immediately follow him picking for the bend, it comes after he's basically bent fully and starts to hold it, and I don't see him pick again to produce the harmonic.

You may be right, though.
#4
I'm pretty sure he just bends it and holds it till it starts feeding back, and then kills it.
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#5
Quote by ninjafingers
I'm pretty sure he just bends it and holds it till it starts feeding back, and then kills it.


This or I was also thinking maybe artificial harmonics, but I don't see him do it...
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#6
Quote by Yerjam
This or I was also thinking maybe artificial harmonics, but I don't see him do it...


I'm 99% dure it feedback from the fretted note, that's how come he can kill it just by de-fretting.
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#8
Quote by TheHeartbreaker
The question, though, is how did he get the feedback?


A loud amp and standing in the right place basically, there is probably an exact science to it but crank your amp and experiment works for most people
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#10
^ to relate this to the King Crimson thread on the MT page. Robert Fripp actually provided the guitar track to the David Bowie song "Heroes" using this technique. Apparently he flew in from England, went into the recording studio, put strips of tape on the floor marking different notes and then recorded his track in about an hour.


pretty badass. i live in a flat and don't have a massive amp, so i can't try this until i go to rehearsal this coming week
#11
It's also easier to get feedback with a hollow body or semi-hollow than with a solid body. And distortion/fuzz can help as well.

So - if you have one or both, you can probably find a way to replicate the sound without cranking your amp.
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#12
Quote by Freepower
^ you can actually get different notes by standing different places relative to your amp. I don't know the math behind it but I've heard of it being used in interesting ways.


The sound vibrations that hit the string are at a different frequency. What happens when you get feedback is basically the string is vibrating at the frequency it would if it were a different length, so when it coincides with a 'strong' length such as an octave, a fifth, third etc you can get a strong note out of it.
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#13
Or he could be using some sort of sustainer with an octave mode.
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#14
Quote by public property
The sound vibrations that hit the string are at a different frequency. What happens when you get feedback is basically the string is vibrating at the frequency it would if it were a different length, so when it coincides with a 'strong' length such as an octave, a fifth, third etc you can get a strong note out of it.


I know that much math behind it. What I don't know is how to figure out where to stand.