#1
I'm transposing some chords to play with another guitarist on a rendition of Silent Night. How would I transpose the chords up a few frets on my guitar using the capo? I'm pretty sure you use the circle of fifths for this to figure which numbered chords in a progression to use, but I really am not sure. Help? Please?
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#2
Let's say that you want to place a capo at the 3rd fret and play a C chord. As long as you understand how whole and half steps work, this is pretty easy. Since we're using the capo at the 3rd fret, that translates into a step and a half. If I play a chord using the A fingering, it's now a C. If I play a chord using the D fingering, it's now an F. How about a chord using the open G fingering? You've got an A#. One more example: How about an E fingering? If you guessed G, you're correct. Let's go back to our A fingering. Let's add a step and a half to it. A, B, C. Make sense? How about our D fingering? D, E, F. How about our E fingering? E, F#, G. If you're familiar with standard major scale intervals - do not get this confused with them. We're only concerned with steps along the neck of the guitar - nothing else. Let's do one more to make sure you have it down. How about a standard C fingering with the capo at fret 3? Let's count up a step and a half and see if we match notes. C, D, D# or Eb. Agree?
#4
Quote by KG6_Steven
Let's say that you want to place a capo at the 3rd fret and play a C chord. As long as you understand how whole and half steps work, this is pretty easy. Since we're using the capo at the 3rd fret, that translates into a step and a half. If I play a chord using the A fingering, it's now a C. If I play a chord using the D fingering, it's now an F. How about a chord using the open G fingering? You've got an A#. One more example: How about an E fingering? If you guessed G, you're correct. Let's go back to our A fingering. Let's add a step and a half to it. A, B, C. Make sense? How about our D fingering? D, E, F. How about our E fingering? E, F#, G. If you're familiar with standard major scale intervals - do not get this confused with them. We're only concerned with steps along the neck of the guitar - nothing else. Let's do one more to make sure you have it down. How about a standard C fingering with the capo at fret 3? Let's count up a step and a half and see if we match notes. C, D, D# or Eb. Agree?

Hey thanks! This was really helpful! So how would that work if I'm needing suspended or minor chords?

EDIT: The progression is G, Cadd9, Am, Em7. Very nice sounding progression if you ask me
Quote by necrosis1193
As usual Natrone's mouth spouts general win.

Quote by Silverstein14
man, Natrone you're some kind of ninja I swear


Quote by gregs1020
plexi


i realize the longshot that is. little giant to humongous one.


Rest In Peace Stevie Ray
#5
Not too difficult, all you have to do is be familiar with the chords within various keys.
Your example is in G Major, and the progression is I IV ii vi
You can play that progression in any key at all as long as you are familiar with the chords that that key's scale makes up. For example, that progression in B major would be as follows:
B Eadd9 C#min g#min7
I IV ii vi
Last edited by Paquijón at Dec 5, 2008,