#1
So I just started recording, and I have the guitar and bass tracks. Now I want to add drum tracks. Are there any free drum tracks online that I can simply add to my songs, or do I have to spend money on a drum program like this one.

http://pro-audio.musiciansfriend.com/product/Toontrack-EZdrummer-Multi-Layer-Drum-Sampler?sku=703056

I heard its really complicated (midi, sound cards, etc.) but if I do get a drum software, which one would be a good and cheap one to get.

but hopefully there are some free ones online?

thanks
#2
I said this in another thread, but there is a great program called DrumStation. It comes with samples, but they're probably not going to be what you want. But there are thousands on the internet. Or you could spend a little bit of money on some professional samples. Its literally only going to be peanuts, if you shop around that is.

Anyway, hope that helps!
I love you long time.
Last edited by NO.WAY at Dec 5, 2008,
#3
the program i use is free, but you need to snag your own samples. you can pop ANY kind of sample into it like pianos, synths, strings, etc.

i have 2 songs in my profile if you want to hear a demonstration of it.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#4
www.looperman.com
or any similar site

should have loops and such that are at least useable. might take some digging and what not maybe a bit of editing too, but its free ya know?

-Ryan
#5
Quote by Kivarenn82
the program i use is free, but you need to snag your own samples. you can pop ANY kind of sample into it like pianos, synths, strings, etc.

i have 2 songs in my profile if you want to hear a demonstration of it.


they sound pretty nice. which program is it?
#6
whoops late reply.

the program is called modplug. its downloadable for free but like i said it doesn't come with any samples. so its not exactly functional out of the box. if you can make your own drums samples or know where to find good ones, then this program can hook you up
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#8
for non pro stuff.....nah.

If your not selling your stuff, then its not worth it.
granted you arn't prolly gonna get as good of quality, but your stuff will sound decent if you work with it.

-Ryan
#10
Quote by Jared R. Boyd
for non pro stuff.....nah.

If your not selling your stuff, then its not worth it.
granted you arn't prolly gonna get as good of quality, but your stuff will sound decent if you work with it.

-Ryan


even for pro stuff its not unheard of to use drum machines.

one of Necrophagists albums was done with a machine, as well as Devin townsends "ziltoid the omniscient" album

these are the only two i can think of off the top of my head that are outstanding albums done with machines.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#11
Quote by Kivarenn82
even for pro stuff its not unheard of to use drum machines.

one of Necrophagists albums was done with a machine, as well as Devin townsends "ziltoid the omniscient" album

these are the only two i can think of off the top of my head that are outstanding albums done with machines.


There was one song on a Meshuggah album that was done using Drumkit From Hell (perhaps not surprising since Tomas Haake had a finger in that pie).

There are plenty of decent drum samples on the net, I posted a set in the Drum Programs thread, so if you find a program you're comfortable with then use any samples you see fit. However, to get a convincing result you need laboriously sampled drums in order to simulate the variation that a real drummer actually has (strike zone, how hard he strikes etc.). And if you're after that kind of realism then something like EZ Drummer, Addictive Drums, BFD or DFH is probably the way to go. Unfortunately really well-programmed drum tracks using great and varied samples don't stand out as much as poorly programmed, single sample beats do so even though a lot of people might not compliment you on your work if you choose the more expensive route it is worth it for what it does to your music.
#12
Quote by ebon00
There was one song on a Meshuggah album that was done using Drumkit From Hell (perhaps not surprising since Tomas Haake had a finger in that pie).

There are plenty of decent drum samples on the net, I posted a set in the Drum Programs thread, so if you find a program you're comfortable with then use any samples you see fit. However, to get a convincing result you need laboriously sampled drums in order to simulate the variation that a real drummer actually has (strike zone, how hard he strikes etc.). And if you're after that kind of realism then something like EZ Drummer, Addictive Drums, BFD or DFH is probably the way to go. Unfortunately really well-programmed drum tracks using great and varied samples don't stand out as much as poorly programmed, single sample beats do so even though a lot of people might not compliment you on your work if you choose the more expensive route it is worth it for what it does to your music.


for sure, its difficult to program rolls without it sounding too robotic. even people like gene hoglan who's been nicked 'the atomic clock' will have timing variables. computers are just always perfect and will sound.. fake

although there some ways to make a computer sound more human such as volume variables and using different forces of samples to simulate a slightly weaker hand (like making every 2nd hit slightly lighter to simulate a less powerful left hand).

but even programming human variables into drum programs is time consuming and a painstaking process. time that could be spent writing more songs

with everything, there's advantages and disadvantages.. but IMO, definitely no wrong way to go about it.
Grammar and spelling omitted as an exercise for the reader.
#13
It is time consuming, but it is worth it for the improvement it gives to your tracks.

Take my advice and make songs with electronic feeling beats. Then you won't have to worry about that, and that's the hardest bit
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