#1
Ok so last night i was jammin and took my avt150 head and plugged it into the PA (dont usually do this but it saved me hauling the 4x12 to rehearsals!). At first it was all good, power light and sound working but had a dodgy guitar cable, changed cable then noticed there was no power to the head, changed power lead but no joy! Didnt hear any pop and it didnt smell of burning/anything strange.......... an internal fuse maybe?
#2
Quote by AnzioFNK
Ok so last night i was jammin and took my avt150 head and plugged it into the PA (dont usually do this but it saved me hauling the 4x12 to rehearsals!). At first it was all good, power light and sound working but had a dodgy guitar cable, changed cable then noticed there was no power to the head, changed power lead but no joy! Didnt hear any pop and it didnt smell of burning/anything strange.......... an internal fuse maybe?

You're an idiot - you probably blew a transformer...although you may be okay seeing as it's a hybrid.

You should NEVER run a head without plugging it into a cab - if you don't there's nothing to take the power, you're lucky you didn't fry your PA as well.
Actually called Mark!

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#3
Quote by steven seagull
You're an idiot - you probably blew a transformer...although you may be okay seeing as it's a hybrid.

You should NEVER run a head without plugging it into a cab - if you don't there's nothing to take the power, you're lucky you didn't fry your PA as well.


I thought that was just with valve heads (ie, the valves will blow if there is nowhere for the power to go!) but ye in that case i guess my bad!

As for the PA, it was a higher wattage that the amp...... take it i got that wrong too?

so........ transformer, big problems or easy fix?
#4
You never plug an amp into a PA, simple as - they're not built to handle that kind of power, only a line level signal at most...the wattage of a PA is how much power they output, they aren't cabs. If an amp has a line out then you can do it, but the head still needs to be connected to a speaker or dummy load, otherwise you mic the cab.

If the transformer goes it's the most expensive part of an amp to fix, but I don't know enough about the AVT's construction to know whether you'd have got away with it or not, it may just have been a fuse.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#5
Quote by steven seagull
You never plug an amp into a PA, simple as - they're not built to handle that kind of power, only a line level signal at most...the wattage of a PA is how much power they output, they aren't cabs. If an amp has a line out then you can do it, but the head still needs to be connected to a speaker or dummy load, otherwise you mic the cab.

If the transformer goes it's the most expensive part of an amp to fix, but I don't know enough about the AVT's construction to know whether you'd have got away with it or not, it may just have been a fuse.



Cheers, ill hand it in locally and keep my fingers crossed!
#6
Check the fuse first.

I'm curious as to how you plugged your amp into the PA. Impedance mismatching in solid state amps is not usually a problem unless you go below the minimum impedance (usually 4 ohms), but I take it that you did not take this into account when hooking your amp up to a PA?
#7
Quote by al112987
Check the fuse first.

I'm curious as to how you plugged your amp into the PA. Impedance mismatching in solid state amps is not usually a problem unless you go below the minimum impedance (usually 4 ohms), but I take it that you did not take this into account when hooking your amp up to a PA?


I plugged the head into the pa as if it was a cab, so from the back of my amp (8Ω to the normal input on the front of the PA.
#8
Eh, AVTs don't have output transformers as far as I know, so that's an expensive problem we can rule out. But still, the power from your amp has to go SOMEWHERE, so you probably fried either the amp or the PA, or both.

Seriously, this is expensive stuff. Didn't you read the manual? They come with amps and PA systems for a reason. And even if you didn't read anything, how f*cking dense do you have to be to make such an obvious mistake?
See, I don't want to be rude and I usually don't call people names, but that was really stupid.

I'd let a tech check the amp and PA as soon as possible. Even if the PA is working now, you can't tell whether some components have been damaged and aren't safe now. A little electronical damage can easily destroy the whole system given enough time, so you need to find out NOW.

EDIT:
One thing that interests me:
How much was the amp cranked? If you have a signal that is a good bit stronger than line level, a PA will distort the signal, so you immediately hear that the signal is too strong. Chances are, if you didn't have the amp's volume higher than 1 your stuff might be still okay.
Well, it MIGHT, best to get it checked anyway.
Last edited by TheQuailman at Dec 8, 2008,