#1
Stupid question - If I were to play chords over a C scale, does that mean I can only play natural notes?
#2
well it yes and no because G goes well with C and E goes well with G.

and mostly people play in Em so it all correspond with each other.
#4
Quote by HeavyMetalDrama
well it yes and no because G goes well with C and E goes well with G.

and mostly people play in Em so it all correspond with each other.


no.

people dont mostly play in em.
#5
So, if I heard a song and I wanted to know the notes being played instead of trying to figure out where the notes are, how do you know what key it's in and if whatever key it's in, what notes should I be looking at? (if anyone could give me an example that would be great).
#6
Finding a key is tough by ear, if you just poke around until you find the tonic, youll be set.

I dont really know what your asking though.
#7
I guess I'm trying to say is what notes go right with whatever scale you're in. To be honest, I'm confusing myself even more :P
Anyway, thanks for the replies
#8
Well, each note has its own major scale. We'll just focus on that for now.
Every major scale follows the same pattern of intervals
W= whole step (2 frets)
H= Half step (1 fret)

Every major scale goes

WWHWWWH
which makes it
CDEFGAB(C)

SO if we move that to G, we get:
GABCDEF#(G)

See what im saying?
#9
Got it, One other quick thing. With chord spelling, this is going to sound stupid but does it up to 14? As major=1,3,5. Can the numbers just keep going?
#10
Well, theoretically, yes.

For instance if you took the d a whole tone above C, that would be a Major 2nd. Butf you moved that D up and octave, you have a Major 9th.

But ya it can theoretically keep going, but noone calls anything higher than 13
#14
Thanks, I will. By the way, is it vital to know all major scales?
#16
Quote by jda12
Thanks, I will. By the way, is it vital to know all major scales?


Know how they are formed, have some point of reference preferably, and then form them yourself whenever you want.
Well, with practice you would eventually remember most major scales, but when in doubt form them (use CoF, etc)
#17
And learn this

Named scale degrees
1st – Tonic- key note
2nd – Supertonic
3rd – Mediant
4th – Subdominant
5th – Dominant
6th – Submediant
7th – Leading Tone (or Leading Note)
8th – Tonic ( or Octave)

Scales with sharp key signatures

C maj – 0 sharps
G maj – 1 sharp – F♯
D maj – 2 sharps – F♯, C♯
A maj – 3 sharps – F♯, C♯, G♯
E maj – 4 sharps – F♯, C♯, G♯, D♯
B maj – 5 sharps – F♯, C♯, G♯, D♯, A♯
F♯ maj – 6 sharps – F♯, C♯, G♯, D♯, A♯, E♯
C♯ maj – 7 sharps – F♯, C♯, G♯, D♯, A♯, E♯, B♯

w/ flat key signatures

C maj – 0 flats
F maj – 1 flat – B♭
B♭ maj – 2 flats – B♭, E♭
E♭ maj – 3 flats – B♭, E♭, A♭
A♭ maj – 4 flats – B♭, E♭, A♭, D♭
D♭ maj – 5 flats – B♭, E♭, A♭, D♭, G♭
G♭ maj – 6 flats – B♭, E♭, A♭, D♭, G♭, C♭
C♭ maj - 7 flats - B♭, E♭, A♭, D♭, G♭, C♭, F♭
Quote by razorback91
Im sorry, I just don't see how you could argue that hardcore isn't metal. That just seems arrogant to me.

Yes, its its own kind of metal, but its still metal.
#18
Another quick thing-
If I'm in key C major, does that mean I can play the major C,F,G scales and minor D,E,A scales? Would that all go well together?
#19
No, because all of those scales save A minor have different notes to C major. For example, F has a Bb in it. You could play the C, F, G major arpeggios and the D E A minor arpeggios however.
#20
Quote by jda12
Stupid question - If I were to play chords over a C scale, does that mean I can only play natural notes?
The simple answer is yes. Only the notes in the scale.

The "advanced" answer requires either 1. You use your ear - if it sounds good do it. 2. Intermediate to Advanced knowledge of theory.

The middle answer is this: The sound of the key of the progression is stronger then any chord you put over it. That means: if you play Dm7, G7, CM7...you've set the key and the tonality in Cmaj. If you follow it up playing Db7, G7, CM7...first of all it will sound weird...but the Cmaj tonality will still be stronger then any of the chords. So, if you want to put in a "crazy" chord that doesn't go with the notes CDEFGAB, then you need to alter ONLY the notes of chords. If you want to put in Db7...then you will be building upon C, Db, E, F, G, Ab,B Cb, C. A C scale with Db7 FORCED into it. So it's the closest you'll get to CMaj while playing a Db7 chord. If this sorta makes sense...then keep at it. If it doesn't, you just gotta use your ear and/or study more theory. Hope it helps!

EDIT: Not a "stupid question" at all!
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