#1
look, I know about phrasing and vibrato and bending, but I need to know, would a major scale mode be sufficient for making a longing, sad type solo? or would a scale be good? I'm trying to make a song about a girl who likes a guy, but he's too high class for her (cheesy I know.)

and the chord progression is A5, B5, and G5
Last edited by AvengedFoghat at Dec 7, 2008,
#2
minor would sound more sad, hence the name
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#3
I might try A Dorian. The B5 chord has that F# - the Dorian note in Am - which isn't present in your natural minor scale. I guess the standard would be E natural minor though.
Quote by dcdossett65
minor would sound more sad, hence the name
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Last edited by ramm_ty at Dec 7, 2008,
#5
Quote by AvengedFoghat
isn't the Dorian mode 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7?

and if it is, wouldn't A dorian be A B C D E F# G A?
That is correct.
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#7
You're not playing A Dorian just because you played a B5 chord. Modal progressions are complex and difficult to fully understand.

A minor scale would be the standard choice for a sad song. Major scales don't always sound happy and minor scale don't always sound sad, but they usually do. You have to fool around and see what sounds good. You're going to be terrible at songwriting when you first try it, as is everyone (I was as well), but the only way to get better is to do it a lot; you will improve.

However, we can't and won't write your music for you.
#9
Quote by AvengedFoghat
look, I know about phrasing and vibrato and bending, but I need to know, would a major scale mode be sufficient for making a longing, sad type solo? or would a scale be good? I'm trying to make a song about a girl who likes a guy, but he's too high class for her (cheesy I know.)

and the chord progression is A5, B5, and G5


Before you worry about scales you should really sort your chords out. You'll struggle to create the mood you want using powerchords. Tweak things so it resolves to a minor key and maybe look to get some movement going on by adding extra intervals to the standard minor and major chords.

By doing that it'll give you far more options in terms of note choice for soloing, because you'll be able to create far more interesting textures due to the wider variety of notes and harmonies you'll have to play over. The scale choice isn't really that crucial, the chords will pretty much decide that for you, what is important is how you use those notes and how they interact with what's underneath, and I don't think simple powerchords will cut it in this situation.
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#10
Quote by dcdossett65
minor would sound more sad, hence the name
Where the hell did this myth come from? Usually, but not always. I've heard alot of upbeat minor songs (it's common in latin jazz) and a lot of sad major songs (common in western music? I'm not american so I have no idea).

Anyway, T/S, phrase slower and keep a slower beat.

Sadder songs use a different kind of phrasing. Whilst happier songs sound jumpy and staccato, sadder songs sound more legato and possibly will be played lower?. You really got to work out your own style of writing sad songs.

Now for some tips.

First off, your chord progression is a little uncommon. What you got ther is a ii-iii-I progression. Definitely not modal. Might I suggest adding one more chord in there? Try a ii-iii-IV-I, so your progression looks like this: A5, B5, C5, G5. This just means you'll hear more or a resolve when you start adding a singing melody to that.
Or, you for a more common looking progression you could try a ii-iii-V-I so it looks like: A5, B5, D5, G5. A progression like this will resolve really nicely when you add a singing melody.

Now for a singing melody. As you're only implying a harmony (aka, chords), you need to outline each chord with their thirds in, else you're not going to get a lot of resolve/movement in your chord progression.
So over A5, try to use as many chord tones from Am as possible, especially on strong beats (first beat of every bar)
Over B5, use Bm chord tones
Over C5, use Cmaj chord tones
Over G5 use Gmaj chord tones
Over D5 use Dmaj chord tones

Always try to use chord tones (preferably the third) on strong beats.

In most contemporary songs, your singing melody is alot more important than whatever the guitar is doing. Try to put as much work into that singing melody as possible. Keep it singable, keep it similar to your lyrics and keep it interesting.

About keeping it singable yet interesting. Too many jumps (meaning going up or down by more than 2 semitones) will make the singing melody hard to sing and therefore it won't be very catchy. Too many little steps (meaning moving by 1 or 2 semitones) might be easy to sing, but won't sound very interesting. You need a balance of both.

Your melody should also reflect your lyrics. Don't use low notes on bright words (sun, live, love and so on) and don't use high notes on dark words (hate, night, beast and so on).

Well, theres just some random tips I thought you might need and that might be appropriate to your skill level (yeah, I prejudged you, what'cha gonna do?). Well keep writing and keep learning your theory and writing conventions, songwriting is a learned skill, not an inherit ability.

Before you worry about scales you should really sort your chords out. You'll struggle to create the mood you want using powerchords.
Lies. Powerchords are fine as long as you make sure you're implying the chords with your melody (which really isn't hard). A good song writer doesn't need full triads.
#11
Lies???

Christ, wind your neck in, you're not the only one with a valid opinion round here

Besides, the threadstarter isn't a "good songwriter", not yet anyways, he's just starting out. It'll be far easier to frame what he's doing with more interesting chords rather than look solely to a melody line.
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