#1
So i know that these formulas get the chords for these scales:

Major Scales
Major Minor Minor Major Major Minor Dimished

Minor Scales
Minor Diminished Major Minor Minor Major Major

so what's the formula for Modes and lets say Exotic Scales (Japanese, Bebop, Pentatonic Minor and Major, Byzantine, etc)? For these scales do I pick any chords that can be created by the notes that are only within the scale? I mean for example like sometimes if you use the numeral system youll get chords with a note that's not in the scale example (B diminshed in the C Major Scale)

Also I know in styles of metal its common to use these chords (1+5 aka power chord and the 1+3 or 1+b3) when can i use these in major/minor scales? If so do they replace any other chords (from the numeral system)?
#2
huh?

well, take the scale, find the chords for each degree, and then assess them to see waht kind they are?
#3
You can find the formulas by running a Google search for a scalefinder. Once you have the notes, you can form chords from those scales the same way you form chords based on the major scale, though this rarely gives desirable results. If you do not know how to form chords from the notes of the major scale, please read the theory link in my sig and then we'll talk.
#4
lol definitely not the answers i was looking for
okay well let me just say I know that you can use intervals to create chords etc add a 7th or a 9th or an 11th or a 13th lol
this is what i wanted to know
can a c major be replaced with a Cmaj7 or a Cmaj9 can a cmin be replaced by Cmin7 how bout a Bdim by a Bsus2 or bsus 4 would these work with the other chords in the scale if i use the roman numeral system?
#5
also is there a system similar to the Roman Numeral theory concept that applies to exotic scales?

Lastly, in A minor Pentatonic the notes are A,C,D,E,G
I = A
b3 = C
4 = D
5 = E
b7 = G

so would power chords be the only chords I could use with this along with A Minor and D and E Minor? What scale degrees are b3 and b7?
#6
You have fundamental problems with your knowledge of basic theory. There was a time when I didn't know what I know now, so that's not an insult, but you need to learn basic material.

No, you can't just replace chords. Cm sounds different than Cm7. A sounds completely different than A7. You need to know the sound that you are trying to obtain in order to select chords to play.

Additionally, you don't build chords from the minor pentatonic scale. The Am pentatonic scale is appropriate over A blues progressions (A7 D7 E7) and Am progressions.
#7
There is no point in constructing chords from exotic scales because the vast majority of them are completely harmonically useless. The chords will not serve to establish any sort of tonal center, and most of them would be little more than tone clusters.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#8
Quote by amd123
So i know that these formulas get the chords for these scales:

Major Scales
Major Minor Minor Major Major Minor Dimished

Minor Scales
Minor Diminished Major Minor Minor Major Major


so what's the formula for Modes and lets say Exotic Scales (Japanese, Bebop, Pentatonic Minor and Major, Byzantine, etc)? For these scales do I pick any chords that can be created by the notes that are only within the scale? I mean for example like sometimes if you use the numeral system youll get chords with a note that's not in the scale example (B diminshed in the C Major Scale)

Also I know in styles of metal its common to use these chords (1+5 aka power chord and the 1+3 or 1+b3) when can i use these in major/minor scales? If so do they replace any other chords (from the numeral system)?


Not correct. Minor scale chords are: i iio III iv V VI viio
My Gear
Ibanez RG7321
Ibanez RG520QS
'78 Ibanez Les Paul copy
Schecter Hellraiser Tempest
Fender Telecaster
Vantage Semihollow
Line6 AX2 212 combo modeling amplifier
#9
Quote by bangoodcharlote
You have fundamental problems with your knowledge of basic theory. There was a time when I didn't know what I know now, so that's not an insult, but you need to learn basic material.

No, you can't just replace chords. Cm sounds different than Cm7. A sounds completely different than A7. You need to know the sound that you are trying to obtain in order to select chords to play.

Additionally, you don't build chords from the minor pentatonic scale. The Am pentatonic scale is appropriate over A blues progressions (A7 D7 E7) and Am progressions.


In a jazz medium, this is done quite often.
#10
Quote by HammerAndSickle
Not correct. Minor scale chords are: i iio III iv V VI viio

dude if you're not smart please dont try to act smart
there are three different minor scales harmonic minor, natural minor, melodic minor obviously im talking about natural minor

please don't take this offensively
#11
Quote by KiErAn123
In a jazz medium, this is done quite often.

what replacing chords? I'll have to try this
#12
Quote by KiErAn123
In a jazz medium, this is done quite often.


Jazz musicians do not go around arbitrarily replacing chords with anything they see fit, no. Not only do chords serve specific functions, but the exact chord will determine how the players approach improvisation.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/scales-to-chords.php

Plug in a scale, get all possible chords. There. Thread over.

Edit: Look up "The Jazz Theory Book" by Mark Levine if you want to understand musical theory. I don't give a crap whether you like jazz or not, the topic in that book are still crazy solid.
Last edited by KenjiBeast at Dec 7, 2008,
#14
Quote by amd123
dude if you're not smart please dont try to act smart
there are three different minor scales harmonic minor, natural minor, melodic minor obviously im talking about natural minor

please don't take this offensively


No, I do believe I'm right. No music of the common practice period used solely natural minor. The whole POINT of harmonic minor was to get those scales to borrow in. If you just play the strictly conventional chords of natural minor it won't sound "minor", in so far as our ears hear it. The substitutions of the major V and diminished viio help to establish a minor chord as the tonic.
My Gear
Ibanez RG7321
Ibanez RG520QS
'78 Ibanez Les Paul copy
Schecter Hellraiser Tempest
Fender Telecaster
Vantage Semihollow
Line6 AX2 212 combo modeling amplifier
#15
Quote by amd123
dude if you're not smart please dont try to act smart
there are three different minor scales harmonic minor, natural minor, melodic minor obviously im talking about natural minor

please don't take this offensively
No, he's right.

If you were writing in minor scales you would use those chords, but you also have the choice of using an III+ (augmented chord) and a bVII chord. Although, you probably should use a vii0 instead of a bVII if you're trying to resolve (so you get a vii0-i movement instead of a bVII-i movement).

It is possible to write in just the natural minor (it's called an aeolian harmony), but that sort thing is very rare and probably not what you want to do. It's not really a true minor based song, it's more of a modal song based around the aeolian mode. The purpose isn't just to resolve on minor tonality, but also to outline the aeolian mode.

Minor tonality (the kind you're looking for) just means to resolve on a note/chord which suggests minor tonality, this means the A in Aminor or the Aminor chord in Aminor. To do this effectively, you should use the chords my socialist comrad suggested instead of the chords you wrote in your original post.

Quote by amd123

so what's the formula for Modes and lets say Exotic Scales (Japanese, Bebop, Pentatonic Minor and Major, Byzantine, etc)? For these scales do I pick any chords that can be created by the notes that are only within the scale? I mean for example like sometimes if you use the numeral system youll get chords with a note that's not in the scale example (B diminshed in the C Major Scale)
It doesn't work like that.

The true exotic scales are based in a style of music that hasn't evolved to the point of applying chords. True exotic scales are microtonal and are mostly used monophoncally or homophonically (meaning no chords and very little accompaniment, mostly a single droning note). Chords and chord progressions are unique to western music, as chord progressions are a relatively recent invention by gregorian monks (around the 1500's in western europe). Only music based loosely off classical music (aka, all western music), will use chords.

The bebop scale is only used in an improvisation, it's not used to write music. Let's say a song a bebop (bebop is actually a style of jazz music) player is improvising over starts playing a C7 chord, that same bebop player may want to break out the C bebop scale and use it to start improvising. He wouldn't harmonise it and get chord from it.

Pentatonics and scales similar to pentatonics (meaning, most 'exotic' scales other than middle-eastern exotic scales) are used in their traditional style homophonically, meaning no chords. Keeping in mind that all cultures except middle-eastern cultures have exclusively used pentatonic based scales (the major scale is actually based of the pentatonic scale) for the past 10,000 years.

Once again, chords are actually a classical invention. Only western music uses chords. The only scales western music uses are based off major and minor scales (and modes, but try not to concern yourself with those until you learn the basics).

Now stop being a jerk and listen to people.