#1
I'm getting a music room built, and would like to be able to use it for recording. We are also getting a new computer to go in there, so, money aside, what would make a good computer for recording?

I'm only looking for base units at the moment (no monitors).

Any ideas?

I'm told that lots of hard disk space would be good and also a decent sound card.

Thanks in advance.
#2
I think the best place to ask would be in Riffs and Recording. Those guys really know their stuff. But as a bit of advice from me, just about every decent musician I know, (and by musician I mean older guys whos income is based soley on their instrument playing and songs), all use Macs. Best of luck dude



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#4
Quote by Low_End_Rocker
I think the best place to ask would be in Riffs and Recording. Those guys really know their stuff. But as a bit of advice from me, just about every decent musician I know, (and by musician I mean older guys whos income is based soley on their instrument playing and songs), all use Macs. Best of luck dude

I was going to post in riffs and recordings but I read the description (Make an awesome solo on guitar or a groovy bassline!) and it didn't seem fitting .

And thanks
#6
Quote by 100%guitarmad
I was going to post in riffs and recordings but I read the description (Make an awesome solo on guitar or a groovy bassline!) and it didn't seem fitting .

And thanks


Haha, yeah, don't let that put you off. Go and have a poke around there. You'll probably learn some cool stuff aswell as getting the answers you want.

And your welcome



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#7
I personally use a PC, but that's just my taste. I also have a few other music programs on there that I can't afford again for mac (FL Studio, etc). Whatever you get, make sure you load it up with tons of RAM.
#8
iMac - Whack up the RAM, and if you need to, install Windows. Should do you for recording. It's expensive though.... Looking around 2 grand GBP.
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#9
Whatever you do, DON'T get a mac.

Do it properly, build it yourself. If you're going to modify the mac anyway, you might as well do a new build!

Important things to consider:

Lots of RAM. High speed.
Couple/few hard drives, RAID'd to speed up read/writes, and also make sure they're quick.
Quiet fan (Akasa are very good!) or, if you want a silent system, water cooled (though it's probably not worth it)
Graphics card you can skimp out on, that's not important for a music rig.
Dual-core or quad-core CPU. This is fairly important.


Get a good mother board that'll monitor your fan speed and turn it down where possible.

****s sake people. macs? get a clue.
#10
I'd say, for home recording you don't need a Mac. The Mac programs (Pro Tools & Logic) are expensive and you can get a decent version of Cubase for Windows which is as good as anything for home recording.

You need plenty of RAM, a decent hard drive and invest in a good soundcard.
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#11
Quote by Stormx
Whatever you do, DON'T get a mac.

Do it properly, build it yourself. If you're going to modify the mac anyway, you might as well do a new build!

Important things to consider:

Lots of RAM. High speed.
Couple/few hard drives, RAID'd to speed up read/writes, and also make sure they're quick.
Quiet fan (Akasa are very good!) or, if you want a silent system, water cooled (though it's probably not worth it)
Graphics card you can skimp out on, that's not important for a music rig.
Dual-core or quad-core CPU. This is fairly important.


Get a good mother board that'll monitor your fan speed and turn it down where possible.

****s sake people. macs? get a clue.


I reckon listen to this guy, he seems to know what he is on about.

What is the problem with macs though?



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#12
Quote by Low_End_Rocker
I reckon listen to this guy, he seems to know what he is on about.

What is the problem with macs though?


They're more design than function, and if you want to run Mac OSX without any trouble.

But people are saying buy one, gut it, and put XP on it anyway. I don't see the point. It'll be cheaper AND easier to just do a newbuild. You don't need to buy EVERYTHING from scratch either, a barebones system (case, mobo, ram, cpu) will be surprisingly cheap, even for a high-spec good looking system.

I built my current system for about £450, and it encodes MP3s in a flash, plays any game you throw at it, and I can't hear it. I too do music production, though nothing serious, and it holds up just fine. I could run Photoshop, Ableton and do some rendering on it symaltaniously and have no noticable slow down, I suspect.

In order to get that from even a high-spec mac, you'd be paying a LOT. And for what? So it's shiney and you can make a bunch of youtube videos about how great mac is? Pass..


EDIT: Oh, and this build was the first I'd EVER done. I'd swapped hard drives in and out before, but never anything serious. And really, it's like building a bookcase. You just follow the instructions on the motherboard and its fine. It took a few hours, but only cause I was being super careful. And a few hours to save £500 or more is worth it I think.
#13
Quote by Stormx
They're more design than function, and if you want to run Mac OSX without any trouble.

But people are saying buy one, gut it, and put XP on it anyway. I don't see the point. It'll be cheaper AND easier to just do a newbuild. You don't need to buy EVERYTHING from scratch either, a barebones system (case, mobo, ram, cpu) will be surprisingly cheap, even for a high-spec good looking system.

I built my current system for about £450, and it encodes MP3s in a flash, plays any game you throw at it, and I can't hear it. I too do music production, though nothing serious, and it holds up just fine. I could run Photoshop, Ableton and do some rendering on it symaltaniously and have no noticable slow down, I suspect.

In order to get that from even a high-spec mac, you'd be paying a LOT. And for what? So it's shiney and you can make a bunch of youtube videos about how great mac is? Pass..


EDIT: Oh, and this build was the first I'd EVER done. I'd swapped hard drives in and out before, but never anything serious. And really, it's like building a bookcase. You just follow the instructions on the motherboard and its fine. It took a few hours, but only cause I was being super careful. And a few hours to save £500 or more is worth it I think.



I'm with this guy.

Macs are really cool looking, user-friendly, but that's about it. It's more looks than anything else. Plus, you can't upgrade Macs like you could if you built it yourself.
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#14
There is absolutely no point spending £2200 on a computer for recording, that's absolutely extortionate.

To be completely honest, it doesn't even matter that much what PC you have. I use a laptop with 3.0GHZ, 2GB ram, windows vista, and the worst soundcard on the market, but I can still do everything you need to with tons of power to spare.

Hell, I used to record on a desktop with 64mb ram, a 400mhz processor and a 7gb hard drive. There's no need to have all this power unless you're going to be using more synths than you have cells in your body.
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#16
Mac OSX makes it a lot easier for music production because it has utilities such as Audio/Midi Setup which automatically configures all of your music and recording hardware to sync with the computers and the recording programs you put in it, no drivers to worry about.

Performance-wise, you won't really feel a difference between OSX and Windows unless you're doing professional level multi-track recording, in which case you have to go with a Mac. Otherwise, it's up to you. Despite what other ill-informed people here thinks, Macs are more than just looks, but you don't necessarily need it. I personally prefer PCs for desktop and MacBook Pros for laptop.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#17
go with Stormx.

I will possibly be building a computer soon for only recording purposes for only $600-$800, and it will be better than what you can do on some $2000 computers, though I won't be able to do much else on it other than record/edit.
#18
Quote by Xiaoxi
Mac OSX makes it a lot easier for music production because it has utilities such as Audio/Midi Setup which automatically configures all of your music and recording hardware to sync with the computers and the recording programs you put in it, no drivers to worry about.

Performance-wise, you won't really feel a difference between OSX and Windows unless you're doing professional level multi-track recording, in which case you have to go with a Mac. Otherwise, it's up to you. Despite what other ill-informed people here thinks, Macs are more than just looks, but you don't necessarily need it. I personally prefer PCs for desktop and MacBook Pros for laptop.


On a related note, I've loaded Mac OSX on this machine :>

EDIT: Also, it really depends what level of recording you're doing. If you're having full bands on synthesisers and drum machines, midi is a bunch more important. if it's just you and a guitar with lots of layering, you're not looking for something as complicated.

If you are going the full hog, you'll need to look at getting external soundcards with full jack ports and proper syncing.
#19
Quote by Stormx
On a related note, I've loaded Mac OSX on this machine :>

I've done that before. Not worth the hassle at all.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#20
Use OSX.

Apple Macs are a luxurious package, but are expensive. I have an iMac and its amazing, super quick, easy to use...great for professional packages. Its very reliable also.
#21
About the only thing I'd ever recommend a Mac for would be this. So, yeah... go for it. <.<

/linuxfag
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#22
Quote by Xiaoxi
I've done that before. Not worth the hassle at all.


I didn't find it too hard. I had issues with it not detecting hard drives at first, but I guess I'm a bit technical so I sort of enjoyed figuring it out.

Quote by all-powerful-oz
About the only thing I'd ever recommend a Mac for would be this. So, yeah... go for it. <.<

/linuxfag


I enjoy using Jokosher under linux for recording, it's pretty sweet. It's basic but it doesn't feel restrictive.
#23
Apple Macs are pretty common. Your gonnaneed a killer sound card and speakers and it probally wouldnt be a terrible idea to invest in programs like Garageband and frootyloops.
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#24
Quote by Stormx
I didn't find it too hard. I had issues with it not detecting hard drives at first, but I guess I'm a bit technical so I sort of enjoyed figuring it out.

It's really about luck. The hacked distros didn't have support for my wireless card and a bunch of other crap. It's still not worth it because they're all disabled versions.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#25
I use a Macbook Pro and have Logic Express, I really like the program, and with every obscure and fine detail that is yours to control makes it fantastic.

Mind you, I have only started using the program and have barely found out everything about it, and I've only made a few random little recordings to get the jist of it.

So far so good though, you don't need a lot of experience to get started - so you won't be frustrated, and you just pick things up as you go.

I see nothing wrong with Macs.
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#26
Get a Mac you can't go wrong with Garageband, which comes on it
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#27
Every mac program has a windows equal. Stop recommending macs. They're expensive and offer no significant advantage over buying an ordinary off-the-shelf computer.
#28
Quote by Stormx
I enjoy using Jokosher under linux for recording, it's pretty sweet. It's basic but it doesn't feel restrictive.

Never heard of this before, but I'm checking it out now and it seems kosher. Danke.

EDIT: Wow, unintentional pun ftw. XD
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#29
Quote by mitchgib93
Get a Mac you can't go wrong with Garageband, which comes on it

ou can if you need any sort of powerful editing or mastering options. Garageband is ok for basic recording and sequencing, but sucks for everything else, that's why Apple has a more powerful audio program (Logic)


I suggest a home built windows system.

at least 1 TB of hard drive space, a 64 bit processor, 4 GB RAM, a ok graphics card (it takes a load off the processor and system RAM) a 7.1 surround capable sound card and a good audio interface.

oh, and if money is really no object, invest in a ProTools HD system.
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Last edited by Kid_Thorazine at Dec 8, 2008,