#1
Just posted in the pit but was referred to here


I'm getting a music room built, and would like to be able to use it for recording. We are also getting a new computer to go in there, so, money aside, what would make a good computer for recording?

I'm only looking for base units at the moment (no monitors).

Any ideas?

I'm told that lots of hard disk space would be good and also a decent sound card.

Thanks in advance.
#2
Assuming you mean a desktop, the following specs would be a good starting point:

2.0GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor or better
2GB RAM
7,200rpm hard drive
Firewire 400 and 800 ports

4GB of RAM would be ideal, and you should get as good a processor as your budget allows.

The maximum hard drive space available seems to change each week, so just get as much as you can, without sacrificing spindle speed (ie, if you've got 200GB 7,200rpm vs 320GB 4,200rpm; go for the first one and consider an external hard drive if you need more space).
#3
Quote by blue_strat
Assuming you mean a desktop, the following specs would be a good starting point:

2.0GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor or better
2GB RAM
7,200rpm hard drive
Firewire 400 and 800 ports

4GB of RAM would be ideal, and you should get as good a processor as your budget allows.

The maximum hard drive space available seems to change each week, so just get as much as you can, without sacrificing spindle speed (ie, if you've got 200GB 7,200rpm vs 320GB 4,200rpm; go for the first one and consider an external hard drive if you need more space).

Thanks for that.

EDIT: Did that seem sarcastic?
#4
a decent sound card would be essential, as would fast spindle speed (already mentioned)


and i hear macs are best? i have no idea on that though

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#5
A Mac is going to be much better oriented towards recording both audio and video. If you don't need portability get a nice iMac with (as mentioned above) as much processing power as you can reasonably afford (iMac pros can get ridiculously expensive) I went for portability and got a MacBook with 4GB of processing power and 200GB of storage. External hard drives are pretty cheap though (and Apple even makes Bluetooth ones as well), so you don't have to worry about it as much

My MacBook cost around $2000 USD but you could get one with plenty of power for cheaper. Especially if you go with a desktop as opposed to a laptop
#6
I've used both Mac and PC for recording. Both do a fine job. If you go PC, I would suggest a separate drive for OS/programs and a large drive for media and project storage. Larger is better. The more RAM the better especially if you plan on using a lot of tracks and virtual effects.

I currently use an iMac G5 with 2GB Ram and 320GB HD. I have an M-Audio Firewire 1814 to input multiple tracks and Logic Pro as a software package.
I've also recorded on location with a Macbook Pro (Intel DuoCore 4GB Ram) and M-audio 1814 running Windows Vista.

Whatever you set up, get a good low-latency firewire audio input device. The M-Audio I use is also an external audio playback device. It is nice because I can easily play back recordings through the studio PA.
#8
No difference in end product between Mac and PC. Think about it.... if you use ProTools or Cubase or whatever, and you run it on Mac or on PC, will your tool operate any differently? The software is the same!

Even a bottom of the ladder PC will do audio just fine. We did our album, upwards of 36 tracks of 24-bit audio per song, plus appropriate EQ and FX, on a Celeron 1.7Ghz machine with 512MB RAM. More is nicer, but at the moment, you have no choice but to buy more. I don't think you can buy anything less than 2.0 ghz these days.

Your biggest quality differences for end result will not be in your computer. Your end result will be a combination of all of the following, listed roughly in order of importance:
-great source (singer, guitar, amp, whatever)
-great mics
-great mic preamps
-great room
-great knowledge and experience (think of recording as learning a new instrument.... it takes time and practice to get good)
-great monitors
-great A/D converters
-great plug-ins
-great software
-great computer

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.