#1
What do you think?


When I was twelve years old, James Brown was my introduction to the vast realm of music. I had heard funk, and there was no turning back. It was not his voice, or what he sang about, but instead I was finally able to hear the interplay of all the instruments as a whole. This changed my entire perception of what music was and from that moment on I knew I had found something truly special. This led me to the electric guitar, which has since become more than a part of what I do, but a part of me. The dedication and discipline that guitar required was something completely new to me, but in my gut I was determined to learn.

After a short stint learning to imitate the playing I heard on the James Brown albums, I felt trapped in the confines of the major and minor pentatonic blues scales and couldn’t seem to find a way out. Thereafter I started utilizing the Internet, as well as informal lessons, to immerse myself in everything related to music. I was fighting to get out of my basic pentatonic shapes, and starting to face the dreaded “Modes.” At the time, understanding and utilizing the modes seemed almost as difficult as conquering Mount Everest. I would sit for hours on end staring at little black dots on printed scale diagrams, it was like trying to learn Spanish all over again.

After a few months without much progress, I decided to look at scales in a different way, applying chords to the scales. It clicked. Using the chord theory I acquired online and from my informal lessons, I came to the realization that each mode for a particular scale was connected to the other through the chord relationships. Instead of just looking at the visual patterns making up the scale, I now looked at how chords fit on top of these scales. For example, a Cm6 could use a C Dorian, or A# Ionian, or perhaps G Aeolian. After learning a scale based on its particular sound, I would then go back and look at the theory at the intervals that made it up. While not the quickest way to learn the modes, this was the way it made sense to me.

My dedication is the main reason I’m the musician I am today. I’ve spent countless hours practicing, learning, and expanding my musicianship, but I still know there is much more knowledge to unearthed. Utilizing my dedication and focus, along with the expansive mindset, excellent staff, and inventive atmosphere at Berklee, will contribute to my success both musically and personally in college.
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#2
Nice!!!

What are you playing at the audition?
Stage Rig

Fender Strat
Epi Les Paul
Taylor 110
Boss TU-2
Omega Amps Hot Rod Deluxe (Dumble mod)
Clean/Drive/More Drive footswitch
Mid boost/Preamp boost footswitch

myspace.com/rosscooperband
#3
I'm not in yet, but have an auditon on Jan 17 . But I've got some scholorships lined up so it's not going to be ridicously expensive (if i get in).

I have yet to decide for what to play. Proboly should get on that Maybe Manhattan by Eric Johnson
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#4
Quote by SchecterC-1+Man
Ok?
OH that's the essay. Yeah, that should be great. I didn't find any grammar-related issues or anything, well written.

Now, I have a question for you... how do you like it at Berkley? I originally wanted to go there, but was told (by quite a few people) it just wasn't worth it. Like, if you had enough money/managed to get a scholarship, it was great. If not, it ain't worth it. Do you find this to be true?


Berkley and Berklee are different places.
#7
Quote by Steve The Plank
Berkley and Berklee are different places.



Okay. I thought originally he had just spelled Berkley wrong... sorry about that
My gear:
Schecter C-1+ w/ Seymour duncan Jazz (neck) and Full Shred (bridge), with Sperzels
B-52 LG-100A 4x12 half stack
Rogue LX405 Bass
Yamaha classical
Some sort of acoustic Squier
Boss Flanger
Lyon Chorus
#9
Quote by Jamingguitarist

but I still know there is much more knowledge to unearthed. Utilizing my dedication and focus, along with the expansive mindset, excellent staff, and inventive atmosphere at Berklee, will contribute to my success both musically and personally in college.

Typo.
Sorry not to sound like an asshole, but yeah, I would think you might want to fix that.
#10
Loved it man. I also love your music. Like 20 of the plays on Your Luck Has Changed is me.
Feed your mind.
#12
****in a dude my audition is on Jan 17 as well. Far out. And I liked your essay. What time are you going at?