#1
this is a long story but im trying to make it short and sweet as possibel so bear with me

about 2 years ago when i got my first guitar i bought it from my cousin for 30 bucks. it had been sitting in his closet for around three years and he told me he went and bought it at guitar center for 300 dollars,(yet somehow it doesnt show up on their website) his mom also said this so im hoping they arnt lying to me. so i took it to get it restrung at a local guitar shop and the guy said it had a warped neck from manufacturing and that it couldnt stay in tune unless you drop it down 2 steps. he then proceeded to sell me another guitar so now i am doing some research on it to see wat the hell happened to me. but heres where it gets weird... the name Edison guitars doesnt show up on the internet and upon further inspection i see it was made in indonesia. i also noticed the action is higher than bob marley at woodstock so i see a few possibilitys

my cousin and his mom lied to me and they bought it from a pawn shop for 10 bucks and a vacume


the guy at the guitar shop somehow made the strings sit high on the nut to make the neck seem warped (i dont think this is possible but anyway)


guitar center used to sell it but doesnt anymore and the company went out of buisness and perished from the earth


if anyone knows about edison guitars or wat could have happend PLEASE help me
#3
if it was strung during the three years, the constant pressure of the strings pulling down on the neck of the guitar could have warped it (if you ever leave a guitar anywhere for more than a few months you should take the strings off it). I doubt your cousin and his mom would have lied to you.
#4
I'd say consider yourself lucky and lesson learned. You had to know there was a reason why it was tucked away in the closet. There's only two things that come out of the closet - and one of them is bad guitars.
#6
Quote by CG Man16
if it was strung during the three years, the constant pressure of the strings pulling down on the neck of the guitar could have warped it (if you ever leave a guitar anywhere for more than a few months you should take the strings off it). I doubt your cousin and his mom would have lied to you.



What the? How long have you been playing? You'll be staying after class today and writing something on the board about 1000 times. That's the most ridiculous hogwash I've ever heard, except for the time my ex-wife told me she loved me. I've got guitars that have been under constant tune and strung for over 10 years and there's no warping at all. That kind of cheesy crap only happens to dimestore guitars that are sold at Sam's and Walmart.

Now, one more lie like that last one and you're off to the Dean's office.
#7
Quote by VertigodowN
so how do u explain edison disapearing?



Companies come and go. A company that was around a few years ago could've fallen on hard times and gone under. It happens all the time - look around you.
#9
Quote by KG6_Steven
What the? How long have you been playing? You'll be staying after class today and writing something on the board about 1000 times. That's the most ridiculous hogwash I've ever heard, except for the time my ex-wife told me she loved me. I've got guitars that have been under constant tune and strung for over 10 years and there's no warping at all. That kind of cheesy crap only happens to dimestore guitars that are sold at Sam's and Walmart.

Now, one more lie like that last one and you're off to the Dean's office.


It's very possible to warp in a few years(maybe not 3 years, but close) if the humidity is off. Lack of humidity can make the wood much weaker, leading to warping. I'm guessing that the guitars you have were probably kept in the right conditions?
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#10
Hmmmm. Did it come with a pick?

Seriously, any guitar that only cost $300 new most likely won't have any parts worth salvaging. You could probably reuse the bridge pins, but any guitar you buy will probably have better ones.

And really, don't listen to that other "expert." Guitars can remain strung and tuned for months on end. The only time you need to relax the tuning a little bit is when you fly with your guitar. Leaving a quality guitar tuned will not damage the neck.
#11
just to let u kno the only reason it was in the closet is because he quit, but his guitar teacher would have noticed it so it must of happened in the closet *chuckle*
#12
Quote by captivate
It's very possible to warp in a few years(maybe not 3 years, but close) if the humidity is off. Lack of humidity can make the wood much weaker, leading to warping. I'm guessing that the guitars you have were probably kept in the right conditions?


Another one for Mythbusters. Lack of humidity does not cause the wood to weaken. As wood dries out, it becomes much harder. Ask any sawmill if they'd rather cut dried out wood, or wood that is freshly felled. I'll bet they choose the latter. Wood that has sat around and dried out is hard as a rock. I challenge you to reference any acoustic guitar maker's website (Martin, Taylor, Gibson, Takemine...). Wood acts like a sponge and absorbs the moisture from the air. It also gives up that moisture at a high rate when the RH is low and the air is considered dry. An acoustic guitar exposed to dry air will actually shrink and the bridge will lower, resulting in lower action and buzzing frets. Excessive humidity results in the bridge rising, which also causes the action to become higher. The worst thing that will happen to a high quality guitar with a solid top, is the constant exposure to fluctuating high (>40%) and low (<30%) RH is the top of the guitar splits/cracks. The only time you'll ever experience a warped neck due to humidity is when the guitar is exposed to water. Read any of the knowledgeable websites and they'll confirm this is true. Furthermore, even if a guitar has dried out and the bridge has sunk, it's possible to revitalize the guitar by humidifying it over an extended period of time. I maintain all of my guitars in an environmentally controlled room.
#14
Depends on how badly warped the neck is. If it's slightly warped and still playable, I'd play it until you cand get another one. If it's so bad that it looks like the Hunchback, then I'd write it off and play what you already have, or get another one.
#16
Depends on how knowledgeable the guy behind the counter is. He may be able to spot your warped neck a mile away and offer nothing for the guitar. Either way, I wouldn't expect to make enough the buy a new Gibson LPS or PRS CE24. I'd say you'd be lucky to walk away with $10 or $20.
#17
Good point about it being stronger. Didn't think of that. But as you said, the guitar will tend to lower the action. It does so by sagging inwards and shrinking. So isn't it possible that the neck may shrink more/less at certain points, leading to what would appear to be warping? Especially since the wood used to make the necks probably aren't as high grade as used for the soundboard.

Just throwing the idea out there. I'm definitely by no means an expert and want to learn whenever the opportunity arises.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#18
If you think about it, your guitar is actually getting larger and smaller as it absorbs and releases moisture. They've actually weighed guitars that were properly humidified and then weighed them when they dried out. The do, indeed, become heavier and lighter as you alluded. Given that fact, have you ever noticed that your guitar may be sharp one day and flat the next? I generally strive to maintain 50% RH in my guitar room and if the humidity fluctuates even a few percent, I'll see it on my tuners - and I'll bet you have too. So, on to your question - Since the entire neck is generally made out of one piece of wood, except for the fretboard, it should shrink and expand at a constant rate, over the entire neck. I've never read any horror stories about high/low humidity causing a neck to warp. The only horror stories I've read are the solid top (mostly high end) guitars being exposed to real low humidity in the winter and cracking somewhere on the body. This is also bad news for the guitars with a Nitro finish, since Nitrocellulose doesn't handle flexing real well. Nitro is usually only found on your more high end guitars, such as Gibsons and Fenders.

If you purchase a quality guitar, the neck should be made of very durable and strong wood. Most necks are made of Maple, which is a hardwood. Mahogany is another hardwood seen in the neck. Again, the only time I'd worry about the construction of a guitar is if it were, for example, one of those cheesy First Act guitars you see at Target and Walmart around this time of the year. Oh, and some of the cheaper 12-string guitars also suffer from weak necks, which can lead to warping. There's a lot of tension on the necks of those guitars.
#19
Quote by KG6_Steven
What the? How long have you been playing? You'll be staying after class today and writing something on the board about 1000 times. That's the most ridiculous hogwash I've ever heard, except for the time my ex-wife told me she loved me. I've got guitars that have been under constant tune and strung for over 10 years and there's no warping at all. That kind of cheesy crap only happens to dimestore guitars that are sold at Sam's and Walmart.

Now, one more lie like that last one and you're off to the Dean's office.

hmm, whatever. I've heard of it happening several times (my friends). And for your first question it would be 2 years.
#20
my old taylor big baby got a warped neck, and it was always kept at normal humidity levels. course, i'm sure taylor majorly skimped on the construction of that guitar (hell, it was an acoustic with a bolt on neck), however, i dont see how else it would have happened other than string pressure.
#21
so wat should i do with this guitar?[/QUOTES]

Step 1 Get Better.
Step 2 Start/Join A Band
Step 3 Cover Tribute By Tenacious D
Step 4 After you first live performance proceed to smash the guitar into a million pieces.
#22
Quote by KG6_Steven
If you think about it, your guitar is actually getting larger and smaller as it absorbs and releases moisture. They've actually weighed guitars that were properly humidified and then weighed them when they dried out. The do, indeed, become heavier and lighter as you alluded. Given that fact, have you ever noticed that your guitar may be sharp one day and flat the next? I generally strive to maintain 50% RH in my guitar room and if the humidity fluctuates even a few percent, I'll see it on my tuners - and I'll bet you have too. So, on to your question - Since the entire neck is generally made out of one piece of wood, except for the fretboard, it should shrink and expand at a constant rate, over the entire neck. I've never read any horror stories about high/low humidity causing a neck to warp. The only horror stories I've read are the solid top (mostly high end) guitars being exposed to real low humidity in the winter and cracking somewhere on the body. This is also bad news for the guitars with a Nitro finish, since Nitrocellulose doesn't handle flexing real well. Nitro is usually only found on your more high end guitars, such as Gibsons and Fenders.



You contradict yourself over and over again with these posts. First you say that humidity can't affect the wood, because it gets harder and is impossible to warp over the years. Then you go on and on about how other parts of a guitar expand and contract due to varying humidity levels, and can become permanently damaged, and that you keep all your guitars in a climate-controlled room. Then you say only contact with water can cause a neck to warp - just what do you think high humidity is??

So get it straight - does the wood become harder and impervious to humidity, or is wood always going to be vulnerable to humidity changes? The latter sounds a helluva lot more likely to me.

Is it so hard to fathom that wood, an organic material, may not expand and contract at a perfectly uniform rate? Or that such a piece of wood, left at extremely high or low humidity over many years, may become progressively more and more warped, especially with full string tension pulling it in one direction?

And yes, I've read all the "knowledgeable" websites, and every one I've read has said, YES, poor humidity control can cause necks to warp, and if you're going to store your guitar for more than a few months you should take the strings off or slack them just in case.

And I've also read a ton of material written by luthiers regarding the treatment of wood. Wood only becomes significantly more "stable" as it dries out from its living state until it reaches a certain moisture level that is suitable for building with. The reason why people humidify or dehumidify their guitars (depending on where they live) is to keep the guitar at roughly the same moisture level that it was built at, not because there's some magical happy moisture level. If a guitar was built in a climate of only 20% humidity, then putting it in a room at 60% humidity is going to cause problems, and vice versa. The wood isn't more or less stable at a certain humidity level, it's just that any expansion or contraction due to CHANGES in humidity can potentially cause damage, because the change in humidity causes the size and proportions of the carefully-fitted parts change. That's all.
#23
My advice.

A reasonably well made guitar WILL NOT crap out after 3 years in constant tension, even under fairly harsh humidity conditions. Humidity changes day by day, and unless he lives in a hut in the Sahara or a lean-to in a the Degobah, the humidity wont damage it in three years. If something was laying on it in the closet or it was damaged previously, that is a different story.

Quote by sunshowers
And yes, I've read all the "knowledgeable" websites, and every one I've read has said, YES, poor humidity control can cause necks to warp, and if you're going to store your guitar for more than a few months you should take the strings off or slack them just in case.

If you take the strings off, the truss rod starts forcing the neck back. To even it out, you need to loosen the truss-rod also. The guy KG6 was originally disagreeing with said that you should remove the strings every few months during normal playing because it puts you at risk for neck damage, which it does not.

For the original guy...

Here is what I suspect. Do you know how to differentiate a warped neck from a poorly set-up neck? If so, are you aware that a certain direction of warping can be easily remedied (a-la truss rod)? It sounds to me like the guitar just hasn't been tended to and needs a decent guitar tech to tune it up.

That said, who cares if you payed only $30? And, if it was really that terrible, why didn't you say no when you tried it out? Nobody tried to screw you.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Dec 11, 2008,