#1
I started playing guitar about July of this year, so forgive me if this is a noob thread. I listen to metal, which means I listen to Slayer, which means I play Slayer, which means fast picking.

My natural picking technique is to rest my wrist at the bridge beneath the string i'm picking. However, this makes it hard for me to palm mute quickly or pick two to three strings at sixteenth note beats. It also makes it hard for me to play an Original Floyd Rose or any other bridge with fine tuners that stick up obnoxiously, and it also makes it hard for me to play a normal fixed bridge, because my natural picking technique calls for me to rest my palm at a level lower than the bridge, touching the body.

This doesn't seem like the case for anyone else, because i've seen people pick with their entire hand floating above the strings and picking, which is totally impossible for me.

Is this something that you other guitarists have had to get used to? Do you have any suggestions to remedy this problem? Are there any other techniques you can suggest that I try to switch to?

Sorry about the wall of text, people, but this has really been getting to me lately.
#3
well, my advice for you, which I've been told a million times, is not to anchor your hand. try to play everything with your picking hand not touching the guitar. it helps develop good picking technique, which will help you be a better player in the long run.
#5
I have heard the same as azninvasion
but personally i anchor my hand
it really is an opinion that hasnt been settled between guitarists
anchoring does call for more work by your hand to achieve speed
but then again it allows for guitarist to know what they are picking
in relation to the distance of their anchored finger/s

Im not all that heavily into metal
but i know that someone like alexi laiho anchors

its up to you, and its always good to get someone to
teach you how to anchor properly
in case what youre doing can be done differently to improve you speed
in my opinion its probably a bad idea, although i do it anyway

also its subject to the best way to play a certain technique
Last edited by AJ18 at Dec 8, 2008,
#6
Quote by cohen5250
I started playing guitar about July of this year, so forgive me if this is a noob thread. I listen to metal, which means I listen to Slayer, which means I play Slayer, which means fast picking.

My natural picking technique is to rest my wrist at the bridge beneath the string i'm picking. However, this makes it hard for me to palm mute quickly or pick two to three strings at sixteenth note beats. It also makes it hard for me to play an Original Floyd Rose or any other bridge with fine tuners that stick up obnoxiously, and it also makes it hard for me to play a normal fixed bridge, because my natural picking technique calls for me to rest my palm at a level lower than the bridge, touching the body.

This doesn't seem like the case for anyone else, because i've seen people pick with their entire hand floating above the strings and picking, which is totally impossible for me.

Is this something that you other guitarists have had to get used to? Do you have any suggestions to remedy this problem? Are there any other techniques you can suggest that I try to switch to?

Sorry about the wall of text, people, but this has really been getting to me lately.

You're NOT going to be able to pick that fast yet, not accurately enough for it to be worthwhile at any rate. You may like Slayer and want to play Slayer but it simply isn't an option at the moment - you're going to have to take some time simply learning to play the guitar. If you want to ever develop into a fast player you have to get there gradually and build a firm foundation of basic technique.

Concentrate on learning to play accurately and cleanly and also learning as much about the instrument as you can along the way, that means expanding your horizons and learning different genres. Doing that will make you a better all-round guitarist, and as you improve technically you'll eventually get to the point where tackling Slayer songs is a realistic challenge - you'll know yourself when they're within your grasp. This early on it isn't though, you may as well just bang your head against a wall for all the progress you'll make.

As far as technique gows you have to learn how to do something correctly if you ever want to be able to do it quickly, so slow things right down and analyze your technique, look for the flaws you want to address and figure out how to sort them out. Once you've taught yourself how to do something correctly you can look to gradually speed things up over time - if it starts to go wrong again then you're going too fast. That applies to everything, whether you're trying to play a single chord or an entire song.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Dec 8, 2008,
#7
^ His sig is true.

+1
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#8
Quote by steven seagull
You're NOT going to be able to pick that fast yet, not accurately enough for it to be worthwhile at any rate. You may like Slayer and want to play Slayer but it simply isn't an option at the moment - you're going to have to take some time simply learning to play the guitar. If you want to ever develop into a fast player you have to get there gradually and build a firm foundation of basic technique.

Concentrate on learning to play accurately and cleanly and also learning as much about the instrument as you can along the way, that means expanding your horizons and learning different genres. Doing that will make you a better all-round guitarist, and as you improve technically you'll eventually get to the point where tackling Slayer songs is a realistic challenge - you'll know yourself when they're within your grasp. This early on it isn't though, you may as well just bang your head against a wall for all the progress you'll make.

As far as technique gows you have to learn how to do something correctly if you ever want to be able to do it quickly, so slow things right down and analyze your technique, look for the flaws you want to address and figure out how to sort them out. Once you've taught yourself how to do something correctly you can look to gradually speed things up over time - if it starts to go wrong again then you're going too fast. That applies to everything, whether you're trying to play a single chord or an entire song.

Thanks for the advice, Mister Seagull. I can see now why your recognized by that list.
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