#1
How do you determine if a song is major or minor?

Like if you figure out from the chords that a song is likely C major. Who's to say its not A minor? Do you have to look for centering about the root of the song? Or just the overall mood?
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#4
Quote by stephen_rettie
if its happy its major, if its sad its minor


No.

No no no no no no no.

Basically the tonal centre (the 'home' note, the one that it all resolves to) will be the key of the piece. If a piece has the chords found in C major/A minor etc, and the piece resolves to C, it'll be in C major.
Quote by justinb904
im more of a social godzilla than chameleon

Quote by MetalMessiah665
Alright, I'll give them a try, Japanese Black Speed rarely disappoints.

Quote by azzemojo
Hmm judging from your pic you'd fit in more with a fat busted tribute.
#5
Usually the chord it starts/ends with is what key it's in.

But yeah, the difference between major and minor can really be brought down to whether it sounds happy or sad, imo.
I'm a person.
#6
Quote by duncang
No.

No no no no no no no.

Basically the tonal centre (the 'home' note, the one that it all resolves to) will be the key of the piece. If a piece has the chords found in C major/A minor etc, and the piece resolves to C, it'll be in C major.
This. Also, accidentals may give it away and put into the melodic or harmonic minor.
#7
Quote by stephen_rettie
if its happy its major, if its sad its minor

Quote by libertines4ever
Quote by stephen_rettie
if its happy its major, if its sad its minor

Quote by duncang
Basically the tonal centre (the 'home' note, the one that it all resolves to) will be the key of the piece. If a piece has the chords found in C major/A minor etc, and the piece resolves to C, it'll be in C major.
Finally some sense.

It's about where the chords resolve or what the tonal centre is. Which chord feels like "home". Which chord feels like it's stable and doesn't need to move anywhere.

It may often be the "first chord" or the "last chord" but it isn't a rule you want to live by because it's not always the case and when you come across a situation where it isn't you'll be screwed.
Si
#8
Quote by 20Tigers


It may often be the "first chord" or the "last chord" but it isn't a rule you want to live by because it's not always the case and when you come across a situation where it isn't you'll be screwed.


very true. The particular song I'm thinking about is C major/A minor and the starting chord is Dm and it ends on a G.

Its still tricky though. I'm not sure if its major or minor still cause it goes all over the place in a couple parts. If you want to know what song it is, I got another post going on about it now
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=17537887#post17537887
this is a post. there are many like it but this one is mine

=======================

Taylor Big Baby
Agile 3100 CSB
Peavey classic 30/112
Okko Dominator, Big muff pi, cs3, dd3, ch1, ts9, ad9, classic wah
#9
Quote by mlfarrell
very true. The particular song I'm thinking about is C major/A minor and the starting chord is Dm and it ends on a G.

Its still tricky though. I'm not sure if its major or minor still cause it goes all over the place in a couple parts. If you want to know what song it is, I got another post going on about it now
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=17537887#post17537887



I just explained to you what it is. It's mixolydian, and the reason for the odd minor chord is called modulation.

The "Re-incarnation of Plato" Award 2009
(most intelligent)
The "Good Samaritan" Award 2009 (most helpful)

[font="Palatino Linotype
Who's Andy Timmons??