#1
I'm not really much into theory, but I have been experimenting with changing notes in the major scale and how it ends up sounding. I am aware of which notes you change to get the certain modes, but this b2 is kind of confusing me. Now I know that flatting the 2nd of the natural minor scale will give you the phyrgian mode. However, I've been using this note in a few different instances and I'm a bit confused. For instance, if you're in A minor soloing with pentatonics/blues, and play the sequence of notes C Db A it gives this kind of country sound. If you play the notes E D C# A that basically looks like a walk down the major scale. If you play the notes D C# B A, I don't know what that'd be, but it doesn't sound very minor. Is this a passing note? Basically I've seen that this kind of makes something minor sound major (I think). Then I've also seen that it can make something sound like harmonic minor, but I think at that point you'd be in a different key becaue you'd have to flat the 5th. Could anyone elaborate on this for me? Thanks.
#2
I'm not entirely sure what the above has to do with a b2, but the sequence "D C# B A" doesn't sound like A minor because it isn't. Those notes derive from the A major scale.
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#3
If you're in A minor a b2 would be Bb. Not Db, or C# or whatever else you're talking about. That Db is a minor 2nd in the key of C, not A.
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#4
I thought when changing notes, no matter what mode you're in you always go back to the major scale? That's why I thought the b2 was Db because A minor was based in C major.
#5
Quote by Handym4n
I thought when changing notes, no matter what mode you're in you always go back to the major scale? That's why I thought the b2 was Db because A minor was based in C major.


A minor is completely different from C major. One is not based in the other.
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#8
Yes, they have the same notes, but they are entirely different scales. If they were the same thing, we'd only ever use one of them. C major revolves around the note C. A minor revolves around the note A.
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#9
Quote by Handym4n
I'm not really much into theory, but I have been experimenting with changing notes in the major scale and how it ends up sounding. I am aware of which notes you change to get the certain modes, but this b2 is kind of confusing me. Now I know that flatting the 2nd of the natural minor scale will give you the phyrgian mode. However, I've been using this note in a few different instances and I'm a bit confused. For instance, if you're in A minor soloing with pentatonics/blues, and play the sequence of notes C Db A it gives this kind of country sound. If you play the notes E D C# A that basically looks like a walk down the major scale. If you play the notes D C# B A, I don't know what that'd be, but it doesn't sound very minor. Is this a passing note? Basically I've seen that this kind of makes something minor sound major (I think). Then I've also seen that it can make something sound like harmonic minor, but I think at that point you'd be in a different key becaue you'd have to flat the 5th. Could anyone elaborate on this for me? Thanks.


you're using the notes for A Major not a minor when you're playing. That is, if you enharmonically spell Db to be C#, which is what you did 2 other times in your post.

D C# B A would be walking down the major scale starting on D.

The reason what you're playing doesn't sound minor is because you aren't playing minor. And for harmonic minor, you'd raise the 7th degree in the natural minor scale.

for instance:
a b c d e f g#
e f# g a b c d# and so on.
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#10
Think of it this way. When you're considering modes, DO NOT THINK OF THE RELATIVE MAJOR/MINOR SCALE. That is, C major shares the same notes as A minor. A minor is the relative minor of C major, and the same is true about C major being the relative major to A minor. If they were the same scale, we wouldn't call it A minor. The same can be said about, say, F Lydian (which shares the same notes as C major, starting on F, the characteristic tone in Lydian being the #4).

When considering modes, they're each spelled out from the root. Phrygian is spelled out 1 b2 b3 4 5 b6 b7. When you're spelling modes out this way, you always start with the root, and in the natural major scale, you always start on the major scale. I'll give you a quick example.

In the key of C:

C D E F G A B C
R 2 3 4 5 6 7 R

"R" stands for "root." That's the note that you will start on. Now, when you spell out a mode, regardless of which one, you're going to flat whichever notes are supposed to be flatted (or in the case of Lydian, sharped). So with the Phrygian mode, in C, you would end up with:

C - Db - Eb - F - G - Ab - Bb
R - b2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b6 - b7

Make sense? If you have any questions, let me know. Theory Gods, if I have said anything that is false here, please correct me about it (though I'm pretty sure that I've got it all right...).
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#11
Now I got it. What I think I was trying to ask was what scale you have if you have a minor scale with a raised third. Therefore, it's no longer a minor scale but a major scale with a b6 and b7.
#12
Quote by Handym4n
Now I got it. What I think I was trying to ask was what scale you have if you have a minor scale with a raised third. Therefore, it's no longer a minor scale but a major scale with a b6 and b7.


It has a variety of different names(mixolydian b6, aeolian dominant, melodic major). It is harmonically stable, but in a counter intuitive way, so actually using it is difficult. More likely than not you are just using a diatonic scale with some chromatic tones thrown in, which is how the vast majority of exotic scales should be thought of.
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#13
Quote by Archeo Avis
It has a variety of different names(mixolydian b6, aeolian dominant, melodic major). It is harmonically stable, but in a counter intuitive way, so actually using it is difficult. More likely than not you are just using a diatonic scale with some chromatic tones thrown in, which is how the vast majority of exotic scales should be thought of.


Exactly this.

The word scale is so overrated and misleading.

Something is called exotic scale, because some dude probably took a traditional tune or instrument from a region or place in the world; Took the notes, and named it as such.

People think; "I can play japanese scale, so I can make japanese music"

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