#1
Ok, i have been practicing this and it seems like its getting repetitive. I did the blue note also but still repetitive. I have heard people talking about combining other scales like dorian with the pentatonics.... So should I forget the blues for a while and start learning to use major scales and modes and then start incorperating those scales with the penatonics for a blues sound?
#2
No, dont stop what you're doing. Learn the different modes, and eventually put them together making one shape essentially. You will be able to play one scale all the way up the neck once you learn how to put all the modes together correctly.
#3
blues isn't a sound it's a feel. the blues scale is just a variation of the penta as modes are variations of the major scale.

my advice is learn the notes and not just a position.
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#4
Learn the different modes, and eventually put them together making one shape essentially. You will be able to play one scale all the way up the neck once you learn how to put all the modes together correctly.


No. Modes have absolutely nothing to do with soloing all over the neck. The major scale spans the entire fretboard by itself.
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#5
OK, you have the notes. Now you have to concentrate on making them into a discernible and tasty melody. Probably the two most crucial elements of that are chord tones (if you play to the chord, you will rarely go wrong) and, most importantly, RHYTHM. I have a relatively limited grasp of music theory but I can play solos that will make your ass shake because I am also a drummer and I can syncopate and phrase yo momma's head off.

It's not all just about scales.
#6
If you haven't already, move on to different pentatonic scales. I used A Minor almost exclusively for around six months, but soon after I learned the E Minor pentatonic and the C Minor Pentatonic.

Also lately I've started fooling around with the major scale, something I was never really big on.
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#8
Did I say something wrong?
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#9
Quote by Archeo Avis
No. Modes have absolutely nothing to do with soloing all over the neck. The major scale spans the entire fretboard by itself.

They can be of use though. Backwards modal approach...
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Dude if i were you i'd look more at bands like Dragonforce, Dragonland, Dream Theatre and Power Quest, most of their songs are either in E major, A major, C major or D majhor

#10
Quote by TheGallowsPole
If you haven't already, move on to different pentatonic scales. I used A Minor almost exclusively for around six months, but soon after I learned the E Minor pentatonic and the C Minor Pentatonic.

Also lately I've started fooling around with the major scale, something I was never really big on.

You do realise that they are all the same just starting at a different place? If you know the A minor pentatonic in full meaning all over the fretboard all you have to do is play the same shapes shifted up or down to play in different keys. All the intervals will still be in the same place. Go to allguitarchord.com and have it show you the A minor pentatonic and then have it show you the C minor pentatonic. Notice the patterns are the same but they start on different frets.

Before anyone flames me and says dont play by shapes you asshole: I know the notes as well and am not advocating that you don't need theory or shouldnt learn notes and intervals or anything like that. So dont try to argue with me because I would agree with you this is all important too.
#13
why not play around with some blues or rock backing tracks and just improvise?

concentrate on feel, phrasing, timing and pauses.

the same point where u realise your repetoire of licks and phrases is getting repetitive will likely be the same point at which you'll know what sound/technique you want to incorporate into your passages, so then go and learn it. I favour this approach over just learning things just because other people say they use them.
#14
Pick a key and start investigating how to use the notes that arn't in the pentatonic scale. Create licks that utilise all the different 'outside' notes. You should find you can pretty much use any note as long as you phrase properly. Stick the 'outside' notes inbetween 2 scale or chord tones, or slide/bend into a scale note from an outside note. You can go pretty out in a blues setting as long as you end on a strong tone.
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#15
Quote by /-\liceNChains
You do realise that they are all the same just starting at a different place? If you know the A minor pentatonic in full meaning all over the fretboard all you have to do is play the same shapes shifted up or down to play in different keys. All the intervals will still be in the same place. Go to allguitarchord.com and have it show you the A minor pentatonic and then have it show you the C minor pentatonic. Notice the patterns are the same but they start on different frets.

Before anyone flames me and says dont play by shapes you asshole: I know the notes as well and am not advocating that you don't need theory or shouldnt learn notes and intervals or anything like that. So dont try to argue with me because I would agree with you this is all important too.


I understand that, but when I learned to play it in different places, my rhythm guitarist wasn't quite as pissed off because it meant he could change too
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