#1
So I'm getting into jazz and pulled out a piece to learn. I've formed the chords correctly (except the first one, heh, supposed to be a Fmaj7), and they're hard to switch to. I believe Chord Voicings fit in to facilitate the chord switching, but...

What the hell are Chord Voicings?
If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
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#2
inversions of chords, for example, putting the 5th in the bass instead of the root. If you don't know what this means, look at the theory sticky.
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#3
Aha! The sticky never said anything about Chord Voicings! Perhaps you should look at that yourself!

If you play guitar, please don't waste your time in The Pit, and please instead educate yourself in the Musician Talk forum, where you can be missing out on valuable info.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
It's like you read my mind!

I got meself a self-approving sig. Kick. Ass.
#4
Oh really, well I can confess that I have not looked at it recently.

Basically voicings are ways to reorganize the tones within the chord, maybe to suit the melody better or something. So a Fmaj7 is F A C E, and those can be organized in any way on the fretboard that suits you.
Quote by allislost
I would say that aetherspear speaks nothing but the truth.
UG Blues Group
UG Reggae & Dub Group
Need Professional Mixing for cheap? Need Vinyl to Digital Transfers? PM Me.
#5
The idea is that a triad is made up of three notes, right?
Hence the name triad
But, as you may have noticed, chords on guitar certainly use more than 3 notes
All these extra notes are really just octaves of the three notes making up the triad
So you can move around these octaves any way you please, adding some, subtracting some,etc.
This allows for different voicings

For example
Black Flag and James Taylor may both use G chords
But their arrangement of the notes are different from one another
Giving Black Flag an aggressive sound
And James Taylor a more soothing sound
Two different voicings of one chord
Get it?
Yes.
Last edited by Misc Debris at Dec 8, 2008,
#6
Chord voicings are nothing more than how the played notes are arranged, or repeated or not repeated. Also, it can be as simple as where on the neck the chord is played. For example, let's say I play an open G - 320003. Now let's say that I add the D on the 2nd string, 3rd fret - 320033. It's still a G, but now the voicing is a little bit different. FWIW, the D is the V of the chord and if you go back to the first example of 320003, we play the D on the 4th string.