#1
Well, I've been looking for a good book on the history of the United States. Someone recommended Howard Zinn's "A People's History of the United States". I started reading it, but only a few chapters in I started to become badly disillusioned. It's poorly documented, disorganized, and descends into self-serving sermons on the evils of the West many times.

I read a little bit of "A Patriot's History of the United States", but it was just as bad a "A People's..." when it comes to bias. Someone else recommended me, "Dont Know Much About History", and it seemed alright. I guess no one can write a history book without having some sort of agenda behind it.

I'm not the biggest fan of the US government, but I'd rather not have wickedly biased information as a basis for that dislike. Can anyone in this Pit recommend me a good history book?

Edit:

On a side note, I'm also looking for books to introduce me to anthropology, psychology, and existentialism if anyone can tell me some good books.
Last edited by MS_Mosher at Dec 9, 2008,
#2
Yeah I read 'A People's History...'

I couldn't finish it either, despite my revolutionary pretensions.
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
RED MILITIA FACTION
#3
Noam Chomsky has lots of pamphlets that criticize current American events. I definitely recommend Chomsky, though I don't think he's written anything on American history.

The main Existentialist authors are Satre, Kirkegaard, and Camus. I can't recommend any of those because I myself have yet to read any.
#4
Sartre is heavy going if you're a beginner.

I can recommend Camus' The Plague and especially 'The Outsider' - so good, I'm going to read it again right now.

O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
O O O O O O O O O O
RED MILITIA FACTION
#6
Grendel is a book that deals heavily with existentialism and nihilism, but it's not an introduction to them.

I would read Beowulf first though.
#7
David McCullough is a great author on historic topics. It's not general history, though, so if that's what you want this isn't it.


As for Anthropology, my text book entitled "Principles of Human Evolution" by Roger Lewin and Robert Foley helped me greatly in introducing me to it.
Last edited by SeveralSpecies at Dec 9, 2008,
#8
Quote by KwikKopy
What era?


I'd like a book that does a general history. I don't mind if it's a text book or anything. If you have any recommendations for specifics, I wouldn't mind that either. I'm very interested in the American Revolution, the 20's, and American interventions abroad since WWII.

I have one book called, "Killing Hope" that was about American interventions since WWII, but I've heard it's hopelessly biased. I haven't started reading it yet.
#9
Quote by MS_Mosher
I'd like a book that does a general history. I don't mind if it's a text book or anything. If you have any recommendations for specifics, I wouldn't mind that either. I'm very interested in the American Revolution, the 20's, and American interventions abroad since WWII.

I have one book called, "Killing Hope" that was about American interventions since WWII, but I've heard it's hopelessly biased. I haven't started reading it yet.


1776 - American Revolution
The Greatest Generation - The Great Depression
Band of Brothers - WWII
13 Cent Killers - Vietnam War
Black Hawk Down - US Forces in Somalia in 1993 (my favorite)

I put titles first and then subject. Some of these are also movies and TV, but like they say, the book is always much better.

Since you say general history, I'd go with the first 2 I listed. I like a lot of war novels too, and they're kinda hand-in-hand. Black Hawk Down does a great job of talking about the one particular intervention.
Last edited by KwikKopy at Dec 9, 2008,