#1
I finally bought an acoustic guitar. I'm used to playing bass so what kind of things should I be doing to learn it?
#2
Depends on your resources and the kind of person you are, with regard to how well you commit to practice and learning.

I assume that you bought an acoustic for a reason.......whatever that was......be it a woman, a curiosity, a friend that plays.

Now that you have the thing, you ask yourself, "self, what do I already know; where do I want to go with this; what do I want to play and how do I want to play?"

If you know what you'd like to play, (folk, rock, blues, jazz, bluegrass, country.......whatever), then you need a resource for your learning.

When I started out, (at 14; I'm now 51), I had 2 or three others around me that were my peers, who were also learning the guitar at the same time. So I hung out with them frequently, and we learned together and shared ideas, techniques, .....the new stuff we were trying.

If you have some others around you that you can gather together with fairly frequently, who are able to share their own growth on the guitar with you, that's a big head start.

(I have found a plethera of sources on YouTube.com, LiveVideo.com and other places, for video instruction, if nothing else)

If you have some bucks, ($$) and want to get lessons, then you have to find out if there is a teacher around where you are, that can demonstrate their ability on the guitar to you (ask them to show you their playing style), if you like a more one-on-one experience, and more instant gratification.

Some basic things like, learning how to tune the instrument, are important. You obviously can't play correctly and KNOW that you are, if you are not able to keep the guitar in tune.
It's similar to your Bass guitar in that respect, and BECAUSE of your experience on the Bass, some fundamentals are already in place. (For example, I presume you already have callouses on your fingers; are already familiar with the notes on the strings, etc..)

So, Resources, an extra set of strings (change em out at LEAST once every couple of months, depending on the string condition), keep your guitar in its case when you are not playing it (best protection there is), wipe the strings off and keep the instrument clean, after each playing session.......all of that.

Hope that helps you
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#3
I say start off with chords, then move on to acoustic "riffs", then try out fingerpicking, thats what i did
Pot
Kettle
Black
#4
Step 1: Start off playing like seven nation army or smoke on the water
Step 2: Start Learning Chords... I suggest:
Am
A
G
C
D
E
Em

Try Those For A start

Step 3: Start Learning Harder Songs Examples: Wish You Were Here by Pink Floyd, And Tangerine By Led Zepplin To help With Chords

Step 4: Do Finger Excercises and Scales To A Metranome

Step 5: Try Faster Things Acoustically: Over the Hills and Far Away by Led Zepplin is a good 1 to start on.
#6
The acoustic guitar is great for playing rhythm guitar. Chords would be what you want to start with for rhythm guitar.
#7
Quote by avenger86
The acoustic guitar is great for playing rhythm guitar. Chords would be what you want to start with for rhythm guitar.



Whoo! I love rhythm guitar.
#9
Quote by OurAnnual
Dont just learn conventional chords learn power chords in standard and drop d.



Standard? Drop D?
#10
Quote by Fassa Albrecht
Standard? Drop D?


Drop D is an alternate tuning where the low E string is tuned down a full step. Power chords are chords where you only play the root note and the 5th. For now, don't be concerned with it. Just work on basic chords and strumming.
#11
power Chords are easier, and are used in alot of acoustic songs. Try brain stew by greenday easiest song on the planet.
#12
Quote by GC Shred Off
Drop D is an alternate tuning where the low E string is tuned down a full step. Power chords are chords where you only play the root note and the 5th. For now, don't be concerned with it. Just work on basic chords and strumming.


Ah right...cheers!
#13
Honestly, I wouldn't worry about power chords just yet. They are easy for sure, but I almost see them as cheating.

Learn the real major and minor chords first.
It's Only Rock and Roll, But I like It
#14
Quote by OurAnnual
Step 1: Start off playing like seven nation army or smoke on the water
Step 2: Start Learning Chords... I suggest:
Am
A
G
C
D
E
Em

Try Those For A start

Step 3: Start Learning Harder Songs Examples: Wish You Were Here by Pink Floyd, And Tangerine By Led Zepplin To help With Chords

Step 4: Do Finger Excercises and Scales To A Metranome

Step 5: Try Faster Things Acoustically: Over the Hills and Far Away by Led Zepplin is a good 1 to start on.


Doing Step 1, 2, 4 now for some time and I havent played guitar before. You should have finger strength and agility since you play bass so my guess is you should learn those open chords and them apply them to songs